March 17

General Discussions

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Posted March 17, 2016 by Taylor Anderson in category "Uncategorized

4,990 COMMENTS :

  1. AvatarBy Owen Alexander on

    Hoo boy, I haven’t been in this forum in…years I don’t think. But I just had to come in here.
    My god…I assume no spoilers, but MY GOD. I read Pass of Fire and Winds of Wrath back to back. I’m suffering shell-shock.
    I can’t believe it’s over…
    (sadly plays https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FeFYKKNLDQY)

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Doug White on

      That was fun, but what else would expect from Oscar Brand?

      Reply
  2. AvatarBy Paul Smith on

    I don’t know if this was brought up before, but if the LOT came over in 1939, it had to spend, what 3-5 years “pacifying” the Med? Now if they should have any large scale reversal anywhere, and the news gets out to the “subject” people around the Med., I figure resistance to the regime will grow & become more active. Especially if there can be any foreign support for the resistance. Now if we can get a unified Grik nation under the CM, infiltrators/ expeditionary forces could strike north & west from the Grik areas of Africa & stir up trouble for the LOT. Also, how deep is the straits of Gibraltar in the destroyermen’s world? What sort of tidal race is there? Will it be possible to go in & mine the straits? To try & bottle the in the med? In this world, I know the straits are up to over 2000ft deep.

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Justin on

      Answering some of these risks a breach of the spoiler embargo; maybe we could come back in a few months?

      A military junta will definitely have its share of malcontents.
      Unfortunately, it could work both ways: the Allies’ll have to watch for League infiltrators, and for people back home willing to help them. Even worse for the Republic, which likely has French/German/Spanish/Italian enclaves here and there.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Matt White on

        How long do we want to keep the embargo going? IIRC last year we waited two months?

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Justin on

          Ain’t me, it’s Mr. Anderson. I’d be happy with one month.

          Reply
    2. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

      * I figure resistance to the regime will grow & become more active.*

      Doubt that. The League is simply not THAT bad. Their advanced technology clearly brought benefits for locals also, so the majority of populations is probably at least not actively against them.

      * Now if we can get a unified Grik nation under the CM, infiltrators/ expeditionary forces could strike north & west from the Grik areas of Africa & stir up trouble for the LOT. *

      For what purpose? Griks maybe friendly now, but they have no conflict with League at all, and most definitely would not want another one, after their empire essentially collapsed.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Paul Smith on

        Do we know what the make up of the peoples around the med? what sort of state they had? Can we honestly say the league wasn’t that bad? the league was alluded to doing some things not that much less atrocious than the dominion.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Justin on

          Pretty much all we know about the Med is that there’s a local population all around the coast, some in an ancient Tripoli, and that many in the League think of them as untermensch. That’s bound to cause at least some tension.

          Reply
          1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            To be exact, in 1930s nearly anyone save for France and USSR viewed population of their colonies as more or less untermensch. Some were more notorious, some less, but even USA were far from free of prejustice here.

  3. AvatarBy Robert D on

    Heya! I have a question for Mr Anderson, and no not that Mr Anderson….. I’ve been a huge fan from the beginning needless to say i have most of the books in hardback. Due to being a small business owner everytime a signing event came close to my area I was unable to attend. I was wondering, if i paid for shipping there and return shipping if you could sign the destroyermen books for me? If so I’ll buy the 6 books i have on kindle in hardback for the complete set.

    Reply
  4. AvatarBy Rich Owen on

    So, without giving too much away, any speculation on the two large blasts reported near the end of WOR? I have my own theories…

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Justin on

      Welcome aboard, Rich. Pretty sure we ALL have ideas about what two big blasts in 1945 could mean…

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Rich Owen on

        Thanks, Justin. Long time lurker; first time posting. I’m both relieved and sad that “Winds of Wrath” rapped things up. As it is, I’ve got to build another bookshelf to hold all 15 in hard-back. :)

        Reply
      1. AvatarBy Doug White on

        I have said it before but this comment ALWAYS puts a smile on my face!

        Reply
  5. AvatarBy Mason M. on

    Can they fit larger guns in Savoie?

    Alexey, you’ve been saying how dive bombers are a dead end, but don’t torpedo bombers become a dead end too?

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Rich Owen on

      The usefulness of dive bombers outlasted that of torpedo bombers. Even the Avenger (US mid-war/late-war) torpedo bomber was used primarily as a dive level-bomber and general ground attack aircraft. It saw relatively little use in the torpedo bomber role. Of course, that may have been due to the dearth of Japanese targets, by the time Avengers reached the front line is strength.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Justin on

        I’d guess “lack of targets” is the better reason; TBMs were key in getting Yamato to turn away at Samar, and later in sinking her.

        At any rate, I’m thinking that both types of attack will still be relevant in the DD-verse for decades to come. That is, until the Allies figure out how to make AP rockets and/or guided Yanones…

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Rich Owen on

          Justin, I agree. I believe Musashi took some torp hits before she when down, as well. One thing’s for sure, dive-bomber pilots had a better life expectancy against a reasonable armed target!

          Reply
    2. AvatarBy Matt White on

      Theoretically yes but the general rule of thumb is for every two inches in caliber you increase, you have to drop one gun. So you are limited in how large they could be made.

      You could probably get away with 14 inch rifles by boring the existing ones out not unlike what the Italians did to some of their older dreadnoughts. I’d question the utility. The thinner tubes would have a shorter life and I doubt a 14 inch would be that much more effective than the 13.something they have now.

      Probably better off designing a new class of bigger BB. Except the skipper isn’t a fan of BBs and wisely puts his faith in naval airpower. With planes that are actually getting to be modern, you’d have to be a big gun fanboy to argue for them at this point. Especially given recent results.

      Reply
    3. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

      *Alexey, you’ve been saying how dive bombers are a dead end, but don’t torpedo bombers become a dead end too?*

      Essentially yes. As soon as first US homing torpedo hit water in 1943, it became obvious, that now you could just drop torpedo from safe altitude/distance, and let her home on target by herself.

      Reply
    4. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

      *Can they fit larger guns in Savoie?*

      Theoretically yes, but it hardly would be very practical. She is quite… limited design; essentially, she have the same hull as previous Courbet-class dreadnought, but with larger guns.

      Thing is, that French Navy in 1910s was limited by the size of available drydocks. Most of them could not accommodate ships longer than about 170-180 meters, so this was the upper limit. The enlargement of the drydocks was planned, of course, but it was lengthy, time-consuming process. And France needed battleships now, to counter the Austrian and Italia ones.

      So, both “Courbet”-class, and “Bretagne”-class (of which Savoie is a member) were build already fairly limited. That’s why they received little refits during inter-war period; their small size and poor hydrodynamic made extensive overhaul… not impossible, but impractical. Anyway, they were good enough to counter Italian old battleships, and that was all that worried Marina Nationale.

      Placing larger guns on “Savoie” would demand rebuilding her turrets, shell-handling systems, and changing weight distribution. It would be very costly and complex. Frankly, I see no reason for Alliance to try this; her 340-mm guns are quite good, and French shells were of successful design (much superior to, say, British ones…).

      It is possible that Alliance would want heavier guns for their next-generation fast battleships – they clearly would want something 28-30 knots, capable of operating with their cruisers and destroyers – but they might as well stick with 340-mm guns.

      Reply
  6. AvatarBy Jeff on

    That’s the style Taylor !!!

    Thanks for everything !

    -Jeff

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Doug White on

      Buying the book today…dreading whoever it is we’re losing. But can’t wait to read it and get ready for whatever is coming next. Should I start morning the loss of Walker and Mahan now?

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Doug White on

        I cheated and read the last chapter….well that was interesting to say the least and now I REALLY gotta read the book. Interesting and Taylor I liked what you had to say in the Foreward and the Afterward as well. Very nicely done.

        Reply
          1. AvatarBy Doug White on

            I know….I am truly, well mostly, a little bit sorry?

  7. AvatarBy Tim Yentsch on

    I am waiting for my book to arrive tomorrow. Among other things I am curious to see if the Commandante Teste shows up. She is a 20 kt seaplane carrier in the French navy that could have been readily converted to a CVL She would have certainly been at Tripoli and if operational would be an obvious add on to the LOT fleet Less capable than the Bearn but still a major threat. By the way biplanes are still a LOT possibility as their lower landing speed would make them more suitable for a hastily developed CV

    There are several unexplored areas that could host major surprises. The East coast of the US , eastern South America and Russia are the primary areas likely to be inhabited and have substantial resources Whose side will they line up on

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

      *She is a 20 kt seaplane carrier in the French navy that could have been readily converted to a CVL*

      Well, frankly, Commandant Teste was essentially as capable as contemporary CVL’s – she could carry up to 26 planes, including seaplane fighters and torpedo bombers.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Mason M. on

        “There are several unexplored areas that could host major surprises. The East coast of the US , eastern South America and Russia are the primary areas likely to be inhabited and have substantial resources Whose side will they line up on”

        Well the League hasn’t been very friendly to anyone: humans are considered little better than barbarians, and the natives are animals to them. And any transferees that are not fascist certainly won’t join the league willingly. And fascists might not join for long b/c the league might try to subjugate them like the Germans as well, unless they have a significant force come through with them. So my opinion is that they either stay neutral, or go to the Allies who have enough territory that they could probably give them the ability to make there own country and be neutral anyway.

        Reply
    2. AvatarBy BigPony on

      Eastern South America is talked about a bit towards the end of the book. Cannot really say more than that without spoilering though.

      Reply
  8. AvatarBy Allan Cameron on

    Well that was intense. Kept having “Oh My God, they killed Kenny” moments, then realised what it all meant. Well done Taylor and thanks for the ride. Least I don’t the ‘wait till next year’ feeling at the end of this book.
    Allan

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Mason M. on

      All your talk about it is making me really hope there is a Barnes and Noble that is open and has the books in stock around my area

      Reply
    2. AvatarBy Taylor Anderson on

      Thanks so much, Allan. I guess you can tell that some parts were really hard to write.

      Reply
    3. AvatarBy Justin on

      Very much this. Though the scathingly cynical part of me thought that the last installment would kill Kyle, Stanley and Cartman too and feels a little cheated. The rest of me really liked it.

      You say that now, but wait ’till the continuation series gets announced right this November!

      Reply
  9. AvatarBy Justin on

    (no spoilers)

    “Old Folks’ Home”
    Downtown Baalkpan
    January 31, 1946

    *** OSI CLASSIFICATION LEVEL “GRI-KAKKA” ***

    Henry, good call on trying to predict the next Arrival. Here’s what we’ve got so far:

    15xx: Nuestra Senora de La Quezon; Caribbean

    17xx: Three East Indiamen; Indochina

    1847: Mexican-American war convoy; Caribbean

    1914: SMS Amerika; South Atlantic

    191x: Coal collier; Caribbean

    191x: Czech Legion; Caspian Sea

    1939: Giant-ass fascist fleet, part of Tripoli; Mediterranean

    1942, Walker, Mahan, Amagi, Santa Catalina, S-19, PBY Catalina; Indochina

    1944: Hidoiame; Japan

    1945: Japanese bombers?

    Analysis: As Bradford predicted, the rate of Arrivals definitely seems to be increasing. We’ll update as more information comes in, and let head office draw their own conclusions as always, but me and the others’ve put our heads together and come up with two competing ideas.

    If the blanks really are blank, Arrivals happen in bursts – short periods where they come in year after year, then decades or even centuries of absolutely nothing.
    That’s ~200 years, then ~200 again, 60-80, 67, and then 19-22 between the Czechs and League. Given another ~20 year pause, then a drop to 7 years, we can expect a REAL big dump in ’64, then another in ’77.

    If the blanks aren’t blank, then the next arrival could be as soon as ’48, or even this year.

    Recommendation: We need a bigger fleet.

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Neal Potts on

      It’s entirely possible that the squall is a constant thing and it’s only recently that new arrivals are better equipped to handle the unexpected thrust into a far more hostile world. The tragic element to this is how much the sea lanes and air corridors become congested in the coming decades. There’s a lot of traffic between New York and London which means there’s probably going to be a bone yard of ships and planes between the two locations on the Destroyermen’s world, assuming if there’s an ice sheet that close anyway.

      Reply
    2. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

      *Analysis: As Bradford predicted, the rate of Arrivals definitely seems to be increasing.*

      The other possibility, is that control is increased; i.e. chances of transfers to be noticed, and transferred personnel – rescued, raised up significantly with the establishment of League and Alliance. They are both advanced entities, that control significant parts of the world, and rather interested in gathering new personnel & technology.

      Reply
    3. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

      *Recommendation: We need a bigger fleet.*

      I should point out, that fleet of 1940s would be of very low value against anything hostile that may came from 1964-1977 time period. Technology marched on extremely fast since World War 2.

      While 1920s warships (like Walker) have some use against even 1940s warships, the 1940s warships did not have snowball in hell chances against ships of 1960s. The destructive power, range and autonomy of weaponry increased order of magnitude. Against nuclear-capable warship of 1970s, even the Alliance and League combined would have only a relatively small chances.

      Reply
    4. AvatarBy Steve Moore on

      Just seems to me that as discovered squall events occur closer together, they seem to be focusing more on ‘worlds’ that are near-clones of the DM world. Taylor has yet (OK, I’m waiting to ransom WOW from the grubby hands of the Lending Library) to introduce characters from a modern world entirely different from World Zero. (Republic of Texas doesn’t stop with Mexico, but conquers Central and South America…)

      Since the primary limitation of the squall seems to be no time displacement (1942 is 1942), we’re not going to see Fletchers and Gato boats coming through to match up with Burkes and Ticonderogas, unless they’re coming from Third World navies, like my uncle’s Fletcher that went to the Chilean Navy in 1962.

      Just thinkin’…

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Justin on

        Problem with that first idea is Imperial Germany winning in the Republic world, and fascism being popular in mainland Europe in the League world (should we start numbering these?). So it doesn’t quite appear to be narrowing down to the first timeline.

        Reply
      2. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

        *Since the primary limitation of the squall seems to be no time displacement (1942 is 1942), *

        Frankly, the time displacement took place by definition.

        Reply
    5. AvatarBy Matt White on

      I fear those might not be Japanese bombers. But something else.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Justin on

        Pedantically, the ones in River of Bones were definitely Japanese; their transimissions were ignored and they probably ran out of gas.

        But there’s no reason Enola Gay can’t show up later.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Matt White on

          Yeah I was referring to the unexplained massive explosions in Jaapan. Not the lost aircrews.

          Reply
          1. AvatarBy Mason M. on

            No spoilers as far as I know.

            Does it give dates and/or locations? If it does that might mean it was a 3rd and 4th bomb drop. Might want to send the Corps of Discovery to go investigate Iwo Jima, or surrounding islands, to see if there are 2 crashed B-29s there.

  10. AvatarBy Mason McCormick on

    Google books has a search inside thing for Winds of Wrath that is not restricted to the preview. I also managed to find a “limited” preview that shows MUCH more than the original preview.

    Reply
  11. AvatarBy BigPony on

    Ok, I’m going in! Just got it downloaded on Kindle. I see very little sleep in my future the next 3 days or so 😁

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Matt White on

      My pre-order unlocked on google books this morning. Cant wait for the day to end so I can get started.

      Reply
  12. AvatarBy Justin on

    On another note: would Cat pilots keep their kilts inside the cockpit?

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Doug White on

      Watched on What About It’s life stream. They had astronaut Scott Paraczynski join them. Pretty fun stuff.

      Reply
    2. AvatarBy Neal Potts on

      Finally some good news for the year! A new step forward for our space aspirations.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Taylor Anderson on

        Yes indeed. Perhaps not as awe inspiring as a Saturn V liftoff, but maybe even more promising in the long run. Honestly, if you’d told me in 1969 that the US and Russians (preferably working together) wouldn’t already have thriving colonies on all the useful worlds and in the asteroids by now, I would’ve said you were nuts. But there’s money to be made in space and maybe it’ll take a commercial effort to get humanity back on track. I hope so.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

          Well, Tsiolkovsky Rocket Equation is pretty cruel. Space is costly to reach; Saturn-V was an engineering marvel, but its cost was simply enormous. In 1960s, the only thing that could really boost the space program was probably the placement of nuclear warheads on high orbit.

          Which, actually, isn’t a bad idea. Nuclear missiles on high orbit (geostationary, or semi-stationary) are the perfect retaliation weapon – enemy attack would took hours just to reach them, and in space it is very hard to hide such attack. On the other hands, high-orbit missiles are useless as first-strike weapon, because they need hours to reach Earth – and so the opponent would not worry about you suddenly attacking him.

          So essentially, nuclear missiles on high orbit are good for retaliation, but bad for attacking first – which essentially made them an excellent peace-keeping weapon.

          Reply
          1. AvatarBy Steve Moore on

            In orbit, there’s nothing to hide behind or under, unless you can make them stealthy in orbit and re-entry. Might as well put a bumper sticker on saying SHOOT ME. Subs and cruise missiles a little better choice, if we’re going to keep following MAD. Seems to me the enemies we really need to worry about are not the ones who depend on each other and share the same target circle, but those wo don’t really give a rat’s a** about humanity. Put ’em on the Moon, pointing outwards, make the best of Tsiolkovsky’s genius, whether for defense or exploration, and get them the hell off Earth.

            Oh, and those pesky little pantywaists at the UN and in Clowngress would probably soil their drawers over it. God knows what the EU would do, probably talk more about it or try to tax them since they’d be AMERICAN.

          2. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            *In orbit, there’s nothing to hide behind or under, *

            Exactly. That’s the whole point. Orbiting missiles are safe from sudden attack – such attack would be obviously visible long before it would reach the targets. And since the opposing side could observe your missiles constantly – they would not fear your sudden attack also. Much better than submarines, which are a constant threat of sudden strike by definition.

          3. AvatarBy Steve Moore on

            Somehow I’m not really comfortable with the concept that after I’ve been nuked, my robots will avenge me.

          4. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            *Somehow I’m not really comfortable with the concept that after I’ve been nuked, my robots will avenge me.*

            But this is what nuclear deterrence all about. As long as the opponent knew, that your robots would avenge you, he would not dare to attack. Frankly, this logic worked quite good for more than four decades of Cold War; both side knew that attack would be useless because opponent would retaliate, so they would not attack.

      2. AvatarBy Justin on

        Hoping SpaceX remains a contractor, though. If they start operating independently of NASA – or at least doing it without oversight – it’s only a matter of time before they start bringing xenomorph eggs home for study and blowing up alien villages…

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy BigPony on

          They already do work 100% independently of NASA on a few projects. Starship and Falcon Heavy.

          Reply
    3. AvatarBy Matt White on

      A truly historic moment. If it wasn’t for COVID I would have made the trip down to watch the launch. Maybe next time.

      Reply
    1. AvatarBy Taylor Anderson on

      No reason to shut up but just be mindful that people willing to post here are probably among the most invested in the story, technologically, strategically, sociologically—too many ways to list—and this MUST remain a haven they are comfortable visiting to kick their ideas around, confident others will respect their right to enjoy their own discovery of the storyline without someone arbitrarily tossing out major plot spoilers. I personally would never have countenanced such large “excerpts” anywhere, but the publisher did not consult me. On the other hand, if somebody, even here, wants to go look at them that is fine. Not all will, however, and dumping them here before the book is even released is not cool.

      Reply
  13. AvatarBy Justin on

    May just be PRH’s preview, but Chapter 1 appears to have three different typos: “Confdration” and “Confedartion.” Hope there’s enough time to head over to the publisher and sort things out.

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Justin on

      Nevermind, it’s just PRH. Probably an intern or something.

      Reply
  14. AvatarBy Paul Smith on

    If push comes to shove, could they mine the POF? Is the bottom shallow enough to hold the mines at the correct depth? Are the edges of the pass shallow enough to mine & force the league into a narrow channel & have enough hidden artillery to be able to damage/destroy the thinner skinned ships namely oilers, destroyers & repair/support ships.

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Justin on

      Most importantly, do they have weights and chains capable of withstanding the Atlantic flowing into the Pacific (and vice versa) twice a day?

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Mason McCormick on

        Well they have whatever they were using for the anchors on the seagoing Homes.

        Reply
    2. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

      I really doubt that League would attempt to force through enemy-controlled strait. Recall Dardanelles in WW1 – how the RN and MN blundered here! League clearly would knew better; and they have no real reason to even enter the PoF, actually.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Steve Moore on

        The strait would have still been there, but would the Gallipoli campaign have happened? Maybe Churchill got shot by the Boers?

        Reply
  15. AvatarBy Mason McCormick on

    The preview is finally out! Thank you so much Taylor!!! 😆

    Reply
      1. AvatarBy Mason McCormick on

        I just googled destroyermen book 15 and it had it for google books off to the right side. I can’t find it on my tablet though.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Mason McCormick on

          The google books didn’t have the maps, our history here or silhouettes. I feel like google cheated me! Plus bits of it were missing!

          Reply
    1. AvatarBy jbmedd on

      the exerpt you are describing seems to have more details than the one I found from penguin random house. where did you get yours from. Ive always just bought the audible version and I have never seen previews before the drop date

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Mason McCormick on

        All I know was that I googled destroyermen book 15 and it was off to the right showing the cover, some pages and preview in a blue box. It showed up to page 70 something out of 529 but had 2 pages from each chapter missing. It didn’t have the maps and silhouettes either.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Justin on

          Hey, nobody agreed to talk about ALL the preview. Especially not spoilers.

          Reply
    2. AvatarBy Taylor Anderson on

      No, spoilers here are still not OK. The preview is available but lots of people prefer to discover things as they read the book in their hands, or listen to it. We always have at least a month of no spoilers here.

      Reply
  16. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

    In PoF, Fiedler says: “in six months, perhaps a bit more, you can expect the Dominion to have the aid of . . .” He considered. “Perhaps three to five battleships, old and new, and at least that many light and heavy cruisers.”

    So they have about six months to get Savoie repaired & across the Pacific, along with whatever other ships & tech Reddy can scrape up. But it begs the question, how does a Ju-52 pilot from a fourth string, ill considered partner nation, become privy to the strategic deployment considerations of the LOT fleet? He might know they’re going to send something, but types & numbers? Either the LOT OPSEC sucks, he’s guessing, they’re feeding him disinformation to forward to the allies or some combination of the above. He may know what they have, but he should have little or no idea what or even if, they’re sending anything. After all, he was in the Indian Ocean when Gravois was making deals with the Doms.

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Mason McCormick on

      He was a pilot who was ferrying around intelligence officers who viewed him as unimportant and of no consequence if he learned anything from them. Also could of seen the ships while flying, and he is with a U-boat captain, so Hoffman could have helped him estimate. Then they are also intercepting League communications.

      Reply
  17. AvatarBy jbmedd on

    while I am sure we will see a new dive bomber variant I cant see it being overly effective given a lack of familiarity with the pilots and their lack of experience with LOT armed ships.
    I think Tara and possibly another of her sister ships will bring a fleet of MTB’s and PB-5’s . Use the PB-5s to scout ahead of the fleet as they have the legs for search patterns. Once the LOT is located get Tara within 200 miles then flush the MTB’s . Have them towed in lines of say 5 or 6 behind the destroyers to within their strike range of the LOT fleet. A night action would increase their chances and have them focus on the oilers and other supply ships. Then beat feet back to their tow ships to hitch a ride back to the fleet. Repeat as necessary. They arent subs but they make a dam fine Wolf Pack. you could build 100 MTB’s for every Savoie you could build. Obviously they would be useless if the sea kicks up .

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

      I didn’t like dive bombers. Didn’t like them at all. They are nothing more than a technological dead end, bring into prominence only due to particular combination of factors. Spending resources on something that would essentially be exercise in going nowhere…

      ” Have them towed in lines of say 5 or 6 behind the destroyers to within their strike range of the LOT fleet. ”

      LOT destroyers would have the day of their lives. All those nice, clumsy, defenseless and vulnerable MTB’s to run & tear apart… League destroyer commander who bring back less than five confirmed kills would be ridiculed.

      Seriously, motorboats are NOT the superweapon. They could attack large warships, yes, but they really bad against destroyers, who are faster than MTB’s, have better seakeeping ability and guns to destroy MBT’s.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

        Granting that dive bombers were an eventual dead end, at the time they were developed, they were the only game in town for accurate delivery of bombs. Especially against maneuvering ships. It’s still in use today in ground attacks, as a cheap, reasonably accurate, alternative to more expensive guided munitions. The technique these days isn’t an almost vertical dive anymore, but a more shallow diving run.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

          * It’s still in use today in ground attacks, as a cheap, reasonably accurate, alternative to more expensive guided munitions. *

          Actually no) The guided munition is a very cheap alternative of putting a very costly plane with a VERY costly pilot into the range of enemy AA systems)

          Reply
          1. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

            If your air force can afford it, yes. Many smaller nations can’t, so they still use unguided munitions dropped from relatively cheap platforms (close support aircraft usually). Even the USAF still uses “dumb” bombs regularly on the A-10 & other aircraft.

        2. AvatarBy Justin on

          In other words, glide bombing, which is what Union seaplanes are using right now… and which would probably get a lot of Cats shredded by League AA. Dive bombing appears to be right on the money for now.

          Though they’re definitely going to need a new airframe for it. Not sure what a DP1M1’s rip off speed is, but I don’t think it’s high. And I don’t think it has dive brakes either.

          Reply
    2. AvatarBy Steve Moore on

      MTB’s are an inexpensive weapon intended for use primarily against similar vessels or supply/transport vessels. That was the painful lesson both the Americans and British learned in WW2, and I think the Soviet Union had the same experience in the Black Sea. My background on that is somewhat fuzzy, so if you have any comment Alexey, feel free to step in and correct me.

      Even now, when MTB’s have standoff weapons, they’re still not as effective as 400 knot plus attack aircraft against larger ships; the only modern use I can see for them is brown-water operations.

      However, when it’s all you have, you can produce them cheaply, and you have a 19th century naval opponent, or fighting in night operations in restricted waters, they’re better than nothing.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

        “MTB’s are an inexpensive weapon intended for use primarily against similar vessels or supply/transport vessels. ”

        Er, MBT were not intended to be used against similar vessels. Initially they were designed as a means to attack enemy heavy ships near coastlines – i.e. as coast defense forces.

        ” I think the Soviet Union had the same experience in the Black Sea. My background on that is somewhat fuzzy, so if you have any comment Alexey, feel free to step in and correct me.”

        Generally our experience was, that hydroplanes are bad MTB’s. Our most numerous MTB’s G-5 series were build using a floatplane float as hydrodynamic prototype, and they were… troublesome. Still, they were quite good in harassing transport shipping, being able to hit-and-run against small convoys quite efficiently.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

          It would depend on where the engagement took place as to whether they could use the MTBs. On the open sea, they would be both exposed & too slow to catch the LOT fleet. They would be a viable option if the allies were planning their main action around a choke point of some sort. The MTBs could sortie from inlets near the action after the battle starts & attack while the LOT are distracted by whatever ships Reddy can scrape together to face them. At night or near dawn or dusk they would be next to invisible against a dark shoreline. Even if some of the LOT ships have radar, the early radars had difficulty picking out ships against shorelines, much less smaller MTBs. The WW2 Guadal Canal battles come to mind. We had radar & it didn’t do us much good at first. The Pass of Fire is one choke point option. It would depend on Taylor’s map to know any others, but between Florida & Cuba would be another possible site. It’s a fairly large area in our world, but with the lower sea levels there it should be considerably narrower.

          Reply
          1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            Let’s not forget, that Italians were the one who invented MTB’s, and one of the most efficient MTB users during both World War I and World War II. So basically everything Reddy might knew about MBT – Italians would knew better.

          2. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

            Knowing about their use & expecting/ready for it are two different propositions. Plus we don’t even know if Reddy’s bringing any.

          3. AvatarBy john medd on

            Another MTB option is for the nussies to be given the plans for an unscale full 80 foot elco . The NUS shipyards are of absolutely no use in buiding modern warships but they could rapidly build a mosquito fleet. They build the hulls and the alliance supplies the torps, tubes and engines. I assume with the improvements in engine designs they should be able to do 30-35 knots. The japs in WWII called them devil boats and that was with the for sh*t torps the americans were using. The alliance has shown their torps work and I think the range is now up to 8500 yards. In and around all those carib islands these would be a huge improvement over their existing fleet

          4. AvatarBy john medd on

            Also the nussies are predominately sailors so planes would take too long to train for and the same for a modern warship.
            An MTB would be easy to adjust to and give them the ability to immediately harass the LOT

  18. AvatarBy Justin on

    Come to think of it, we only know roughly how many planes the League’s got, but technically the limit of their capabilities is in how many trained pilots.

    If the League air force is understrength, then many of the M&Ms and bombers can be written off – they’re grounded without anybody to fly them (unless, of course, the League reinvents the Special Attack Units).
    But if they’re overstrength, then they’ve got spare hands to design, build and fly, and it might be a good idea to prepare for biplanes scattered among the moderns.

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Mason McCormick on

      Why not monoplanes? The Alliance managed them with less experienced people.

      Reply
  19. AvatarBy jbmedd on

    just read this puplisher summary on audible. “Undermined by treachery on a stunning scale, Matt Reddy must still steam his battered old ship halfway around the world, scraping up what forces he can along the way, and confront the mightiest armada the world has ever seen in a fiery duel to the death.”

    jeez Taylor outgunned at least three to one wasn’t enough you had to add “treachury on a stunning scale”
    man June 9 feels like a lifetime aaaahhhhhhh

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Mason McCormick on

      Try doing a countdown on a calendar, it makes it feel like time is going faster somewhat. At least you can get it June 9, I will have to wait a week or 2.

      As for the Worlds I’ve Wondered, Courtney doesn’t necessarily live. It could be something like what happened with Robert Jordan. Courtney could have a large portion of it done (He has had long periods of nothing to do on ships), then they finish it for him. I hope he lives though, his antics never get old!

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Steve Moore on

        Or, he can become the Alliance version of Eisenhower.I kinda like that idea… SPINOFF time? With Halik in the role of Tito; not an enemy, not a friend.

        Reply
    2. AvatarBy Steve White on

      It’s part of the “rules of publishing” — when in doubt, add treachery… :-)

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Justin on

        In this case, “treachery” is right on the money. Didn’t see THAT one coming.

        Reply

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