March 17

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Posted March 17, 2016 by Taylor Anderson in category "Uncategorized

5,133 COMMENTS :

  1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

    Interesting theoretical question, by the way: if Alliance were losing the Grik War, would League interfere on their side? They have all reason to be worried about Grik too, after all.

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Justin on

      If they were on the ropes, sure – due to the much higher tech level, it’s in the best interest of the League in this scenario to A) let the Allies lose as much as possible, and B) then swoop in and contain their enemies as and when they need to.

      Of course, there’s a chance that the League might run out of bullets first…

      Reply
  2. AvatarBy Mason M on

    Could we see the construction of a trans Borno railroad/highway between Baalkpan and the Konashi?

    Reply
  3. AvatarBy Steve White on

    A happy thought for a Friday: who here read the recent news stories about the packages of seeds arriving in the mail, having been sent from China, and thought (as I did) of Dennis Silva and the Yap Island seeds?

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Rich Owen on

      LOL, thought the same thing, when I saw the first headline. My second thought was, Audrey II, the carnivorous plant from “Little Shop of Horrors”.

      Reply
  4. AvatarBy Clifton Sutherland on

    SPOILER

    —————————————

    Topic: Post-series speculation, Africa
    #whatnext
    #grik
    #politics
    #diplomacy

    (I have created a potential template if folks wanna create posts that are semi-organized and searchable via control F. thoughts?)

    So, how does Africa look in the next couple of years? How will the various regencies react to the reforms of society under CM? What is Halik going to do as the most effective military in the Grik species? And will the League and Union be playing cold war with each other in Africa, with each supporting various Grik regencies against one another? I like to think that makes sense.

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Justin on

      Beats skimming the whole page. I’m in.

      We still don’t know just how many regencies the Grik have, or how they’d react, so that’s an open question. Given the CM’s competence though, most will probably fall in line.

      I don’t see the League flipping Halik (loyal, perceptive, highly paranoid), or anybody else, but somebody like Tsalka might be bribed into letting them walk through Namibia or something. All in Her Splendor’s best interests, of course…

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Clifton Sutherland on

        Not to mention the idea of the league offering up some tech to a grik viceroy to “rebuild the empire”. Would probably bite them in the butt, but would be a powerful incentive. And remember, even though the CM might be willing to reform grik society and understand what they owe to the Alliance, the war culminated in a tremendous expenditure of resources and lives. I dont think the Alliance is going to be willing to maintain a massive garrison in Africa. Even if they dont like it, the attrition and exhuastion of so many years of war, coupled with a demand to move towards peace, will prevent any sort of total war stance towards the grik, at least for a while.

        Reply
      2. AvatarBy Justin on

        Yeah, best case is a series of garrisons on the African coast, followed by a rapid downsizing… and hopefully an equally rapid modernization.

        After all, the League’s just lost five battleships, several cruisers a dozen-ish DDs and much of their modern airpower in less than a year, and their response is “eh, no big deal, we’d rather have our people back.” Either they’re suicidally overconfident, or they’ve still got other surprises waiting at home.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Clifton Sutherland on

          I like to think that they have so much and had lost so little prior that they dont have the scarcity mindset of a group who crossed over with far less. Also, I do enjoy that, despite being run by a imperialist, fascist military clique, at least some of their ranking officers are more concerned about personnel than material.

          Reply
          1. AvatarBy Justin on

            Leadership’s all about tradeoffs though – your ship’s nothing without the crew, but the crew’s nothing without the ship.
            So as much as we’d like to think the fascists have a conscience (some probably do), there’s an equally good chance that there’s still the other half of their fleet waiting in the Med. They may very well try again in twenty years, this time with carriers.

          2. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            Well, for the League their personnel is the most precious resource. They have largest number of modern (for 1940s) trained technical and scientific personnel in the world. I.e. they have the ability to maintain technologicl superiority for next two decades essentially for granted.

          3. AvatarBy Steve White on

            Agree with Alexey. One wonders why the League sanctioned all the canoodling in the Caribbean and Indian Ocean in the first place. Stay home, build your tech and your society, and burst out beyond the Med when ready. I still don’t understand what the League thought it would get by sending a force to the Caribbean.

          4. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            Well, the current setback probably would remove a lot of opportunists from power, replacing them with the moderates. League made a major mistake trying to took over the whole Dominion, instead of just securing Pass of Fire and Caribbean islands.

    2. AvatarBy Mason M on

      Spoilers

      Well, the grik owe the Grand Alliance quite a debt, as well as the shame of the actions of their ancestors. Halik can go around and conquer/ enforce the CM’s will.

      I would say the League wouldn’t work with the grik, but they worked with the Doms, and are probably VERY desperate now. Might end up being a thousand skirmishes between the two sides. Though they both might have a large amount of troops stationed at the border, and the League might not want to lose anything else for a long while now.

      On the topic of future dispositions: how might the Dom territory look years later? Empire of the New Britain Isles get the west side, Nus gets the east, with the navy clan getting the Pass of Fire?

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Steve White on

        Is the League really desperate?

        They still have a large navy. If we understand the order of battle of what was sent to the Caribbean, the better part of that navy, and almost all of its air corps and army, is still in the Med. They’re still the Masters there. The Grik won’t be marching into North Africa; Halik has better things to do than to march into Anatolia and the Aegean, and the Straits of Hercules is still a superb choke-point to protect their west (okay, Shinya would find a way around that). Long-term looks troubling for the League but first the Allies, the Imperial Brits, the RRP, the NUS, and the new Doms (whatever that turns out to be per Sister Audrey) have to get their stuff in a sock. That’s going to be at least a decade.

        And if the League leaves them all alone, there’s no incentive to go after the Med. Admiral Reddy, in particular, would like nothing better than to retire to a comfortable life with Sandra and the kids.

        The League would need a Mussolini-like leader who is dreaming of glory to spoil all that. Perhaps that’s exactly what they have.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Mason M on

          I haven’t read the book yet, but this is pieced together from multiple google books limited previews.

          Ciano says they lost half their naval forces ( although that might not be the most accurate), they lost at least 50 planes as well. Most were bombers, and that’s not counting other spotter planes. They still have at least 40 M&Ms, but their pilots are rusty, and will be going up against better planes in future conflicts.

          The Grand Alliance now has 4 BBs, an unknown number of cruisers and destroyers, plus is already building better, more modern ships. It might take a decade to be fully prepared though.

          Then there is the fact that the Grand Alliance fleet with what it was composed of, could defeat such a massive naval force. It seems like a pyrrhic victory, but it WAS a pyrrhic victory instead of the seal clubbing it was supposed to be. And they still have a submarine they can use to model their own off of.

          And they don’t have to go after the League in the Med, just return two or so decades later and take over the League’s islands in the Atlantic to be able to bottle them up in the Med. Then wait for nature to do the rest.

          Reply
          1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            *And they don’t have to go after the League in the Med, just return two or so decades later and take over the League’s islands in the Atlantic to be able to bottle them up in the Med. Then wait for nature to do the rest.*

            …And be massacred by new and superior League tech, yeah. I repeat: League have the best supply of modern-trained engineers and scientists all around. Their technical superiority over Alliance is most likely gonna INCREASE in next decade or two, not diminish. While Alliance is forced to build its engineering cadres on half-literate Lemurians & XIX-century tech Imperials, the League have full advantages of having a lot of XX-century trained personnel.

          2. AvatarBy Mason M on

            Admittedly, i’m missing gaps from the book, but all that XX-century personal and tech just got defeated by an bunch of half-literate lemurians, and New Brits.

            The Grand Alliance has a larger willing population, and more resources than the League. They have the advantage of Lemurian night vision, and veteran carrier crews. If it is an all out attack, they can call upon the Repub navy, American Navy Clan, New Britain navy, and possibly some modern ships built by the NUS and ex doms. They also have U-112, and can use her as examples for more subs. That’s a lot of ships and torpedoes.

            The League has, give or take, a million humans (said to not like the league), lost a large chunk of its modern bombers, and has no veteran carrier crews. It is said that all the League’s Admirals prefer Battleships, and if they make any carriers they would be converted, not purpose built.

            Of course we don’t know what the future is going to be, only Taylor Anderson knows.

          3. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            “Admittedly, i’m missing gaps from the book, but all that XX-century personal and tech just got defeated by an bunch of half-literate lemurians, and New Brits.”

            Yeah, who have numbers to throw in, and whop were underestimated by League (which wasn’t exactly prepared for immediate war).

            “The Grand Alliance has a larger willing population, and more resources than the League. They have the advantage of Lemurian night vision, and veteran carrier crews. If it is an all out attack, they can call upon the Repub navy, American Navy Clan, New Britain navy, and possibly some modern ships built by the NUS and ex doms. ”

            And for what reason? Even if such campaign would succeed, it would be A – unprovoked aggression, B – VERY costly. And most importantly C – it would not immediately crush the League, so the point is rather moot.

          4. AvatarBy Justin on

            On top of that Alexey, PoF makes it VERY clear that the League didn’t send their entire fleet to the Caribbean, let alone airpower. That, plus another long-ass supply chain, means that the Allies shouldn’t be rushing into an offensive war.

          5. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            Frankly, I never understood why so many peoples thought that Alliance must “finish” the League. In comparison with Griks and Doms, League caused Alliance nations relatively little real harm – and their goals, while obviously imperialistic, weren’t actually unreasonable. Their power play and support of Alliance enemies actually are perfectly justifiable from their (and not only their) point of view; they have no reason to believe that either side of Alliance-Grik-Dom war, after achieving total victory, would NOT represent great and obvious danger to League.

    3. AvatarBy Jeff on

      Halik has his own fish to fry in his regency and I’d think Jash would become the CM’s First General. North Africa is colder than ours so one thought is that Tripoli might be looked at by the Grik as being as undesirable as the RRP.

      There’s still the matter of a greasy witch doctor and his pet. I wonder if we’ll hear from them again. Hope so.

      I’d also like to know about the Vanished Gods. Were they Gentaa or the strange continental Lemurians that Svec was with?

      Reply
    4. AvatarBy Jeff on

      #whatnext

      The tech has always been cool and integral to the story but the characters make it come alive.

      Just thinking that USS Donaghey could still make itself quite useful for that Corps of Discovery. Like Walker it has become a character too and far more interesting to me than Italian battleships.

      Yap island and the aftermath of Talaud, the trek across Borno, Madagascar, were some of the best parts. “Fish … is that you …. ?” Oh Gawd, I still chuckle. More please ! Maybe we’ll get to find out more about the Vanished Gods, others that have crossed over from slightly less than parallel worlds, go to places where a profusion of modern armaments isn’t readily at hand.

      And somebody PLEASE get Silva another Doom Stomper, or better yet, maybe a Doom Whomper for really going out in the wild.

      Reply
  5. AvatarBy Rich Owen on

    So, now that Mr. Anderson has given the go-ahead…

    Spoiler Alert!

    I wanted to discuss the significance of the two large explosions in Japan at the end of WoR. Given the timing and location, it’s a logical conclusion that they correspond to the atomic bombings. If anyone remembers the second “Superman” movie staring Christopher Reeves, General Zod and his two henchmen (hench-persons???) escaped the phantom zone when Superman lobs a terrorist atomic bomb into space, causing a temporary hole to open between our universe and the phantom zone (this is mentioned at some point in the movie’s dialog). I’m wondering if something similar is implied, here. Or perhaps the “veil” between the D-men’s world and their old world has been growing “thinner”, and it no longer requires the (assumed) natural phenomenon of the Storm to tear a temporary hole in the veil. To use a more modern movie analogy, in “Thor: The Dark World”, the “convergence” allowed similar doorways between the realms to form. This actually opens the possibility that it may be possible to pass in both directions. An interesting spin-off would be a story that takes place in our world, where inhabitants/creatures from the D-men’s world flood into our world. Food for thought…

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Justin on

      Hiroshima and Nagasaki being felt in the DM world could mean anything. Perhaps the dams (or something under them) somehow controlled the Squall events, and their destruction has created a freer flow.
      Or maybe nuclear explosions transcend worlds… in which case, they can expect a whole lot of crap to come through in the next twenty years.

      Bradford’s pitched the idea that pterosaurs and plesiosaurs have managed to go “upward” back into our world and become dragons and sea monsters, but nothing’s been confirmed.
      And there was an old suggestion on the previous site about a Union bomber crashing near Roswell, NM in ’47…

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Rich Owen on

        Hey, Justin! There are some definite things it does mean. It means, for one, that a non-natural phenomenon was able to breach, or bleed through from one universe to the other. The “why” is the question (or one question, at least). Interesting hypothesis on the dams, though difficult to test. There were no atomic blasts, historically prior to the dams being destroyed. On the other hand, a large volcanic explosion (ala, Krakatoa) could somewhat replicate the environmental stress of a nuclear explosion. However, there was definitely some ancient and powerful technology at work in the dams, so it’s not unreasonable to wonder if their destruction could have ripples beyond the classically physical.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

          Er, nobody would use ancient and powerful technology for merely working a dams. Seriously, it’s just unreasonable.

          Reply
          1. AvatarBy Rich Owen on

            Respectfully disagree, Alexey. To quote Sigmund Freud, “Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.” :)

        2. AvatarBy Justin on

          The nuclear war in Metro 2033 literally destroyed heaven and hell, so there’s a precedent. Military nukes are that evil.

          Reply
          1. AvatarBy Taylor Anderson on

            A nuke does discharge a hell of a lot of concentrated energy

          2. AvatarBy Mason M on

            So, does that mean they can nuke themselves into another timeline? I know they don’t have nukes, but that seems like something Denis Silva would somehow manage to do (possibly with Bradford).

          3. AvatarBy Taylor Anderson on

            I don’t think so, Mason. The energy discharge was part of one of Courtney’s early theories—and I’m sure any kind of …..trans-universal migration would require tremendous energy—but I don’t think even Silva would ride an A-bomb Slim Pickens style just to go somewhere else there may not be as many interesting things to kill as where he already is. And the actual mechanics of it, well, a red-hot BB in a vacuum cleaner springs to mind.

          4. AvatarBy Clifton Sutherland on

            so the red hot bb in a vacuum being that the energy of the nuke (bb) is so intense, and excites the mass so much, that it basically rips/burns its way out of the bounds of the normal plane of spacetime (vacuum)?

            thats a good image, almost as good as Silva Slim Pickin’ his way to new hunting grounds haha

          5. AvatarBy Taylor Anderson on

            Well, that wasn’t exactly what I meant—I envisioned the red hot BB more as the vehicle in the nuke, but I like your interpretation better.

      2. AvatarBy Steve White on

        Well then the next ten years would be interesting as the U.S. (in our timeline) would be doing atmospheric tests at regular intervals in the South Pacific.

        Reply
    2. AvatarBy Jeff on

      Sounds like a job for the Corps of Discovery.

      A-bomb blasts bleeding through? Interesting. Maybe.I guess we just assume it was the two we are familiar with. Could be volcanic activity too.

      Whatever it is I have no doubt something, somewhere will need killing.

      So what do you suppose will become of Walker? I keep thinking of what happened to the Bluesmobile …….

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Mason M on

        No intentional spoilers.

        I keep thinking of a 20 years latter jump to an American Navy Clan museum with Donaghey, Mahan, and, or Walker, and a Walker copy, Big Sal, Maka-kakja at port as floating museums. Then a land part with one of the tanks that was at Zanzibar, and a Mk II, as well as other things.

        Reply
  6. AvatarBy Clifton Sutherland on

    Petition to start semi-official spoiler threads? Also, does this site have a taggable or hashtag function, to find posts by topic? for instance, spoilors, speculation, etc?

    Reply
      1. AvatarBy Taylor Anderson on

        That capability is unavailable as far as I know. As to spoilers, I think sufficient time has passed. Might be polite to give warnings on posts and re-posts and replies?

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Clifton Sutherland on

          bummer, I guess just having each longer post have a heading and a separation if containing spoilers; I suppose Control F will can help a bit!

          Reply
  7. AvatarBy Mason M on

    Do the Grand Alliance use any form of body identification, like dog tags? I know lemurians can probably be told apart due to distinct coloring, but what about the humans?

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Clifton Sutherland on

      if they do, I dont recall it being mentioned, but it would make absoulte sense. Even if most lemurians dont come from a tradition of written language, the rapid proliferation of english as the military lingua franca probably means most NCO’s and staff ‘Cats can read. I bet identifications is done in a haphazard manner, varying by unit or culture. Maybe something as complex as standardized metal tags showing name, rank, unit, etc exsist, but I bet it varies across the board, from everything like bamboo tags on uniforms to simple paper notes scrawled on uniforms before battle, a la Cold Harbor.

      Reply
  8. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

    I believe he means the Douglas company doesn’t exist in the transfer world.
    The “D” may stand for “Dive”. That’s what I had it stand for with my STD bomber.

    Reply
  9. AvatarBy Justin on

    Been bugging me for a while: what does the D in the SBD/TBD-2 stand for? The Douglas Aircraft Company doesn’t exist here.

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    1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

      Er, Douglas Aircraft Company existed since 1921.

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      1. AvatarBy Doug White on

        Merged with McDonnell Aircraft in ’67 or ’68 and then they merged with Boeing around 2000. Yeah and Alexey is correct they started in 1921.

        Or did you mean something else?

        Reply
      2. AvatarBy Justin on

        And yet they had nothing to do with Mallory and Murianme’s new bomber. The D clearly stands for something else.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Mason M. on

          Can you give any specifications? All I want to know is crew size, payload size, speed, max altitude, and armament.

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          1. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

            He left the TBD specs a little vague, but it will carry a one ton bomb or full sized torpedo. IIRC it has two .50 cal BMGs in the nose & two .30 cal MGs behind the wing dorsally. Probably 2-3 crew. No speed given, just “fast” & also no max altitude given.

          2. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            Well, despite being rather streamlined, I suspect that it is underpowered a lot, so with max payload it probably have speed in low 200s km/h. I suspect, that while empty it may be able to reach up to 300 km/h, the max speed with payload would be no more than 250 km/h, and fully-loaded it would struggle to reach 220 km/h. Same with altitude. Alliance simply do not have particularly powerful motors.

          3. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

            They do have single stage superchargers now, so the radials may be in the 550-600 hp range, but that power will fall off at higher altitudes. One problem for the Alliance, is they still haven’t got either an O2 or pressurized air breathing system for the crews, which restricts them to operations below 8-9,000 feet. So LOT aircraft will still be able to fly higher. That’s assuming they can make a decent grade of aviation fuel.

          4. AvatarBy Justin on

            50′ wingspan, >40′ fuselage, double-stack radials (700hp?); probably has a bombardier seat. Also mention of how they should be just as fast but more agile than a League light bomber.

            I’m leaning toward “wooden twin-engine Stuka that can dogfight.” Without stats though, that’s just speculation. Can it even dive bomb?

          5. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            Please, let’s NOT assume too much. I repeat: Alliance tech is primitive. They do not have aircraft engineers, or aluminum. Their planes are crude – not as crude as Kurokawa’s ones, but still primitive.

          6. AvatarBy Justin on

            Author’s words. Not mine. If two twin-row radials can keep up with a Stuka, and the plane itself can out-turn it, then the Allies aren’t as outclassed as we believed they were.

          7. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            Aerodynamic is the same in any world, when humans could live. As well as the fact, that by 1930s aviation became too complicated, to been done by inventors. It became science and engineering first and foremost, the work of collectives of highly trained specialists.

          8. AvatarBy Justin on

            Obviously we’re not going to be seeing any actual 40s-level warplanes any time soon, but it’s a little asinine to be saying Mallory, Muriname and friends can’t do what the book literally says they’ve already done. I mean, the Mosquito was wooden too.

          9. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            The Mosquito was a product of one of the most advanced engineering of 1940s, even if material was unortodox. It was not simple; it was complex aircraft, designing & fielding which required enormous efforts of one of the most competent aircraft defelopers of Britain.

          10. AvatarBy Justin on

            And not made of aluminum.

            Lemme try again: I’m not expecting the TBD to compete with a Mosquito, or even an M&M, but what we’ve all read says that they’re A) wood frame with twin-row radials, B) able to keep up with an Thirties bomber, and C) able to manoeuvre better than said bomber. No way a YB-9 could do either of the latter, so maybe we should round upward from there, not down?

          11. AvatarBy Justin on

            And I still have no idea what the D stands for.

          12. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

            Could stand for “Dive”, as in dive bomber.

          13. AvatarBy Mason M on

            Okay. So what about the fighter? I know it has one crew, but what else?

          14. AvatarBy Mason M on

            Does the new fighter have .50s or .30s?

        2. AvatarBy Doug White on

          Maybe D might stand for Dilemma? Or it could be the D model or…..

          Reply
          1. AvatarBy Justin on

            Yeah, I thought that for a minute, but there’s a 2 at the end. “D-2” instead of “2-D” is more of a Luftwaffe thing.

          2. AvatarBy DONALD JOHNSON on

            Everybodt knows that TBD means Tp Be Determined so the D means Determined.

    2. AvatarBy Justin on

      Okay, ignoring the name and specs, what’s the next move for the design team? Better engines and a more durable frame, obviously, but would they use them to add firepower (more .50s? A 25?), or increase performance, or maybe add dive capability?

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

        Training better engineers. Otherwise their next step would be in dead end.

        Purely technically, they would soon hit the point of diminishing return with piston engines. The high-powered piston engines are monsters, costly, complicated, and hard to calculate. 1000-hp engine would be out of Alliance reach at least till 1950s.

        They could start experimenet with metal planes – steel alloys, most likely. Aerodynamic would hardly improve much without much better understanding.

        My IMHO, the next step would be all-metal steel alloy plane.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Justin on

          Baalkpan does have the ability to make desk-sized wind tunnels; while they aren’t a substitute for a proper lab or design team, that should allow for some degree of brute-force optimization.
          Plus, all it takes is one random Cat to ask why they need a bombardier seat at all. Then they can ditch that dead weight and make a less draggy nose.

          Reply
    3. AvatarBy Rich Owen on

      One, simple explanation could be that the destroyermen were not familiar with the fact that the last letter in USN aircraft indicates the manufacture. I don’t believe they had any USN aviators among them at the point they began constructing the more advanced “modern” aircraft. Perhaps the person responsible for applying the type-designation only knew that a “TBD” in the old world stood for “torpedo bomber”. Just a thought. I’m a 20 year AF vet, and consider myself well versed in US military info. Yet, I had forgotten this aspect of naval aviation nomenclature.

      Reply
  10. AvatarBy Clifton Sutherland on

    I havent been back on this site for far too long, though I have been active on facebook….life has a way of catching up to you.

    Anyway, I just finished the final pages, and I’m feeling pretty emotional. Glad to have been part of the journey with all of you, and looking forward to guessing whats up next for Taylor and his worlds!

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

      Welcome back, Clifton! Glad to see you again!

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Clifton Sutherland on

        Good to be back! Been busy finishing up University and havent had as much time as I’d’ve liked to muse here!

        Reply
  11. AvatarBy Bruce Watts on

    Am new to this site and was just wondering if anyone is having the same problem. I was given a dog eared copy of “Into the Storm” which I reqally enjoyed. Not being familiar with this Author,(Taylor Anderson), I subsequently went out an bought the entire series and have been reading them, however out of about 12-13 books in the series, some of them (4 so far) are falling apart. Since I use a paper bookmark, and do not lay them flat when open, and severely disappointed with the spline bindings. Is anyone else having this problem? Am really enjoying the story so far, but really,really disappointed in the quality of the books since I tend to keep them.

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Mason M on

      I’m having similar problems, just not as bad. Sometimes its because of you using them too rough, otherwise it just can’t be helped.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Doug White on

        Gotta say I haven’t had that problem, yet anyway, but the first three or four were paperbacks. The rest though are hard back books.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy DONALD JOHNSON on

          all of mine are perfect. binding is holding well. I must say though that I do not think they will last 126 years as well as my copy of John Jacob Astor’s Sci Fi that I acquired 65 years ago. The paper quality is no where as good.

          Reply
    2. AvatarBy Steve Moore on

      Usually QC at the printers; mass market paperbacks are not expected to be an investment item. I’ve had better luck with used hardcovers off Amazoom, they are usually ex-library items. Maybe they’re meant to stand up to more use.

      I tried to fix a couple of paperbacks that the covers had come off, used a diluted solution of Elmers Glue soak the spine, then glued the covers back on with Gorilla Glue. Sometimes it worked, sometimes it didn’t. Probably the capitalist gods punishing me for being such a skinflint and not purchasing a new copy.

      Have to admit, though, with the exception of Taylor’s books up to POF, I have purchased few fiction books for the last few years. It’s much easier to go the Kindle or Audible route. The few non-fiction hardcovers I buy, I circulate through the family Lending Library, then donate to the local library or senior center for the tax deduction. Audible is nice, I have a 7-hour ride from my home in Maine to my office for a monthly visit, and it makes the ride much more interesting. Now if there were some way to load in artwork so that while you were listening, a slide show of PDF’s related to that passage could also pop up; just don’t let the cover art guys in on the action.

      Reply
  12. AvatarBy Justin on

    Since we’re apparently not ready for spoilers, here’s a thought experiment: would the Allies want an Apollo program, and if so, when?

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Neal Potts on

      I’m doubtful. Don’t get me wrong, it would be great to get some scientific equipment into orbit to see the world’s quirks and maybe even track Squall events, but it would be a massive undertaking in resources, personnel, and scientific development, which is something that I don’t think either power would be willing to commit. That is if another Squall were to sweep away some very clever scientists and engineers that would make a compelling case to which ever power they end up in.

      I do find it endlessly amusing that at the time of book 14 the Grik are the leaders of manned rocket flight with that Namazu weapon of theirs. They probably broke a few air-speed records with that first prototype flight, it would even count too since that pilot survived to train others.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Justin on

        “Tranquility Base here… anyone else hungry?”
        – Hij Seelak, 2008

        Reply
    2. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

      Not until well into XXI century, that’s for sure. While they would probably knew about space flights from any post-1957 transfer (or even earlier, if in some parallel world there would be earlier attempts – like short-lived USN’s HTV program of late 1940s), the point is, that they didn’t have neither technology, nor stimulus for space race.

      In our world, space race was initially fueled by military interest and ideological value. Both sides of Cold War viewed space as a way to demonstrate the advantages of their respective social and economical systems. By launching Sputnik and Gagarin, USSR actually won a lot – the world was amazed, the USSR (and socialist system) was praised for their shining successes, while USA (and capitalism system) were viewed quite critically. The Sputnik seriously shattered the unity of NATO, planting the seeds of doubt; are USA actually capable of protecting the Western Europe in case of the war, if they are apparently behind Soviet Union in the most crucial military technology?

      For USA, the Apollo program was quite close to last chance. The American leaders realized, that if they lost Moon to Soviets – again! – their image of power and capabilities would be shattered. Nobody would have any faith into American technology, or ideology, if it would continue to lag behind USSR. That’s why USA put ENORMOUS efforts in Appolo program. They could not allow themselves to lose this time.

      For Destroyermen’s world, such situation would require quite long development of Alliance-League relations to arise. Currently, they aren’t that much into demonstrating their achievements. While it may perfectly be that such kind of competition would arise in future, it would took time before sufficiently advanced technology is developed anyway, and economical resources could be freed.

      Let’s not forget; the space flight was a byproduct of nuclear & ballistic arm race. Currently neither Alliance nor League have nuclear weapons or ballistic missiles – and they clearly would not have either for quite a long time.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Doug White on

        Interesting to read your take on the space race and I suspect it may be closer to the truth than most Americans realize or admit, Alexey.

        As for a space race or even a missile race in the Destroyer men’s world there would, as you say, need to be a reason for big missiles in the first place. Why would either side develop an ICBM style missile if all you’re gonna deliver is high explosives? Or dare I say seeds or other biologicals. But still that’d be overkill.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

          Precisely. Early long-range ballistic missiles were too inaccurate and costly to validate anything except nuclear payload. Even in early 1960s, the accuracy of ICBM was so poor, than only a big, megaton-size fusion warheads could be used (otherwise the probability of actually destroying the target was too low).

          For Destroyernen’s world, I think the military rocketry would be mainly associated with rocket-powered planes and guided precision missiles (SAM’s, ASM’s) than with ballistic. Of course, at some point – around 1980s, unless some transfer would kick tech up – they would reach the level sufficient for space flight, but it wouldn’t be like our world.

          Our space race started with big, powerful ICBM-based boisters, like R-7 and Atlas, capable of sending hundreds of kilograms payload on Earth orbit. Destroyermen’s world space race would probably starts with small, very light, plane-launched boosters, capable of sending no more than a few kilo of payload in space. Their first satellites probably would be mainly passive radar reflectors (inflatable balls of metal film or clouds of wire dipoles), for the purpose long-range radio links.

          Reply
          1. AvatarBy Doug White on

            Like Copenhagen Sub Orbital? Along those lines?

          2. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            Something like NOTS-EV-1 “Pilot” or Japanese Lambda 4S boosters. Small, multi-stage, mainly solid-fuel rockets.

    3. AvatarBy Rich Owen on

      Interesting thoughts on the space race, and the likelihood of it being recreated in the D-men world. The Grik development of rocket technology was driven by many of the same factors that drove Japan and Germany to develop similar, unconventional weapons: most notably, their inability to match their military opponents’ quantitative or qualitative advantage in conventional weapons. While they didn’t materially effect the outcome of WWII, they were not completely ineffective, as the British will attest.

      The advantages of the “ultimate high ground” of space would not likely be lost on the inhabitants of the D-men’s world. Anti-ship missiles will give way to artillery rockets will give way to long-range bombardment missiles. The idea to put a satellite in orbit for purposes of intelligence gathering will mature along side the ability to build better rockets. The idea build a death-seed warhead, as well as chemical weapons, for those long-range rockets, if only as a deterrent to potential adversaries to do the same, is entirely reasonable. This would further drive development of bigger and bigger rockets. So, it may take a little longer, but a space program is all but inevitable, in my opinion.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

        *to match their military opponents’ quantitative or qualitative advantage in conventional weapons*

        Actually, the ones who have the most unconventional weapons were Americans) By the end of World War 2, they used teleoperated assault drones, capable of hitting enemy position with great precision, radio-controlled and infrared-homing vertical bombs, and radar-homing, fully-autonomous glide bombs (ASM-N-2 Bat, the great and marvelous example of 1940s engineering). And this was only a tip of the iceberg of fantastic technological development that US military achieved. There were much more coming.

        Neither of their enemies could compete with US in the modern military technology. The best Germany and Japan could achieve, is to have SOME high-tech weapon, comparable with American. In fact, Germany was notoriously incompetent in high-tech; most of their “wunderwaffe” were either absolutely impractical (like V-2 missile), or blatantly stolen from someone else (like their guided bomb – they used French-developed guidance system).

        *Anti-ship missiles will give way to artillery rockets will give way to long-range bombardment missiles. *

        Problem is, that without nuclear warhead the long-range bombardment rockets are… not of much use. They are highly inaccurate, and this wasn’t actually remedied till at least 1970s. The V-2 was barely adequate for hitting large cities.

        “The idea to put a satellite in orbit for purposes of intelligence gathering will mature along side the ability to build better rockets. ”

        No it wouldn’t. To be able to make sensible photo from orbit, you need 1960s tech level. The photo system, capable of working from 150-200 km altitude would be rather big and delicate; and returning the data on Earth would be problematic by itself. In fact, the first Soviet recon satellites were essentially… a derivative of “Voskhod” manned spacecraft; instead of pilot seat, they have photo camera installed in the re-entry capsule, and the return of photo data was achieved by re-entering the whole capsule)

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

          The Brits came up with some wild weapons themselves. Not all that high tech, but very effective. The dam buster missions with their spinning barrels of doom & the large “Earthquake” or seismic bombs. Both concepts courtesy of one Mr. Barnes Wallis.

          Reply
          1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            Yep. And they also worked on other, less known projects. For example, they put a lot of efforts into development of guided surface-to-air and air-to-air missiles during the war; they do not proceed with them much because by 1944 the Luftwaffe threat was over, but their wartime work served as basic for post-war development of British missiles.

            Also there were some… extravagant projects, like “Helmover Projector”; the giant, ten-ton aerial (!) torpedo, driven by Merlin engine. Essentially an unmanned submarine, it was supposed to be deployed from Lankaster bomber, and then guided into the target by radio, from the command plane above. It have programmable autopilot, so near the enemy it could be set to dive & run pre-set distance (and if missed, to surface for re-targeting), and was armed with one-ton warhead.

            The “Helmover Projector” was tested in 1945, but by that time the war was nearly over, and development was eventually cancelled.

        2. AvatarBy Rich Owen on

          Hey, Alexey! Couple of points I’d respond with. It is true that at the end of the war, the United States was fielding some amazing tech, such as the ASM-N-2 you mention (as an aside, it was Germany that scored the first ship sinkings with terminally guided anti-ship missiles, in 1943-1944). My point was that the deployment of long-range rockets (V1, V2) by Germany was driven to some extent by the fact that they had no other means to take the fight to the enemy’s homeland later in the war. I was just noting the historical parallels that Taylor himself has said occur often in the D-men series. Desperation drove Germany to rush development in unconventional (at the time) technology; they saw it as the only way to overcome the asymmetrical advantages the Allies enjoyed after 1943.

          I respectfully disagree with your position that development of long-range rockets has no military value without nuclear weapons. As we sit here at our computers today, there are thousands upon thousands of conventionally-tipped long-range rockets deployed today. Plus, as I noted, nuclear weapons are not the only WMD that can be (and are) deployed on many of those rockets. So, rocket technology would proceed in the D-men’s world.

          Regarding your dismissal of my statement, “The idea to put a satellite in orbit for purposes of intelligence gathering will mature along side the ability to build better rockets”, I didn’t say it was going to happen immediately. Of course it would require the evolution of technology to similar levels that were required in our own history. I merely stated that it WOULD happen eventually, as the abilities of rockets improved. Indeed, the desire to put recon and comm sats into orbit would itself drive rocket technology forward. As we saw in the D-men books, the Grand Alliance had already learned the value of aerial photo recon. Necessity is the mother of invention. So, yes…it would :) .

          Reply
          1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            *by Germany was driven to some extent by the fact that they had no other means to take the fight to the enemy’s homeland later in the war. *

            Yes, but it was a very specific conditions. And while V-1 was at least economically effective – it was cheap, and forced Britain to tie down rather costly force of radars, fighters and AA guns to defend against flying bombs – the V-2 was complete failure as weapon. It was notoriously expensive, and since defense against it was at this moment impossible (British have some ideas about very tight computer-guided AA barrage to stop V-2, but considered it only marginally effective), so British just didn’t spend money on it.

            *As we sit here at our computers today, there are thousands upon thousands of conventionally-tipped long-range rockets deployed today. *

            Yes, but technology marched on rather significantly, I must add. If we are talking about ballistics – up until 1970s, their accuracy was rather poor even for short-range ones.

            *Plus, as I noted, nuclear weapons are not the only WMD that can be (and are) deployed on many of those rockets. *

            Problem is, that chemical or biological weapon just… could not be efficiently deployed by ballistics. They needed to be dispersed over large area – not just dropped in one tight bunch on hypersonic velocity. And chemical/biological weapon required MASSING. It is only efficient if used in rather large quantities. Ballistic missiles are just too costly to validate this use.

            * So, rocket technology would proceed in the D-men’s world.*

            Proceed – yes. But not in the area of long-range ballistics. They are of no use.

            *I merely stated that it WOULD happen eventually, *

            With THAT, I agree. But it would not be soon. It would be at least 1980s, until they would be able to launch anything, and at least 2000s until they would be able to launch enough mass to make recon satellite workable.

          2. AvatarBy Justin on

            I’d say that the V1/V2 program was one part desperation, one part lunacy. Nazi high command was high off Wagner operas and had an obsession with “wunderwaffe” that could win the war all by themselves, which also led to the Horten 229, the P.1000 and P.1500, and the Sonnengewehr, among other things. Other nations’ experiments were a lot more practical.

          3. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            Exactly, Justin. Ironically, that said impractical “wunderwaffe” created the myth about Nazi having “very advanced technology” – while actually their technology was backward & getting worse as war progressed.

  13. AvatarBy Justin on

    Alright, today is the official one-month mark, so the spoiler block is theoretically lifted.

    However, in light of some people who prefer a longer block, perhaps we can start with low-priority plot and work our way up? For example, the Imperators have been set up since two books ago.

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Matt White on

      Maybe. We need widespread consent so we doing ruin someone’s day with spoilers. I always read the books as soon as possible so I’m good to go whenever.

      Reply
    2. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

      Well, I think we could discuss technical details without much spoilering about the plot?

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Justin on

        Sure, but I’d argue that it’s simpler to start with the hardware we already knew was coming.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

          A bit disappointed that Taylor did not took my suggestion for sodoum superoxide torpedo) Oh well, can’t have everything, i guess)

          Reply
          1. AvatarBy Justin on

            TBF I don’t think even Bradford knew about those kinds of propellant.

            Might as well kick it off – what does the Republic do with the Imperators now? Not to knock the shipyards’ miracle work, but judging by the description, I’d want to hammer out a proper capital ship class and scrap the old ones immediately after.

          2. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            He obviously knew – it is rather simple chemical reaction. Sodium superoxide (NaO2) is relatively easy to produce by burning Na2O2 or pure Na in oxygen atmosphere under pressure, and it is much safer than pure oxygen. And it is easy to release oxygen from it; just heat it to 100 c.

          3. AvatarBy Mason M on

            Could they convert the Imperitors into CVs?

          4. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            For what reason?

            Really, the idea that “more carriers are all answers” are flawed.

          5. AvatarBy Paul Smith on

            Justin, unless the tech completely changes, us the Imperators as training ships like the navy did with the Wyoming. It’ll probably be years to do it right, even with the ships the alliance has acquired used for templates. The biggest thing might be to develop their BuShips, & all the associated organizations (ordinance & such.)

          6. AvatarBy Justin on

            Makes sense. Still, having the FCC camped out in Alex-aandra should make things a lot easier than they would’ve been otherwise.

          7. AvatarBy Matt White on

            Courtney was too preoccupied with is work in the Republic to contribute to weapons development. And just because he may know about the chemical reaction, which seems reasonable enough, doesn’t meant he would put two and two together and think of it in those terms. Bradford doesn’t have Silva’s talent for weapons. And what can seem obvious in hindsight isn’t so at the time.

    3. AvatarBy Steve Moore on

      Kind of surprised to see Silva channeling Dr. Spock and offering baby advice. That’s about as far as I got before WOW went on a walkabout from the Lending Library. :-(

      Reply
  14. AvatarBy Owen Alexander on

    Hoo boy, I haven’t been in this forum in…years I don’t think. But I just had to come in here.
    My god…I assume no spoilers, but MY GOD. I read Pass of Fire and Winds of Wrath back to back. I’m suffering shell-shock.
    I can’t believe it’s over…
    (sadly plays https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FeFYKKNLDQY)

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Doug White on

      That was fun, but what else would expect from Oscar Brand?

      Reply
    2. AvatarBy Denis on

      Since I’m new here, I wonder if any contributor wonders about the possibility of the author’s world existence? I’m not a science person. However, I read about physics, philosophy and math quite regularly.

      It seems to me, two optics of investigation offer possibilities. The first (scientific) as you know rests on Quantum plus String Theories. Eleven dimensions offer theoretical possibilities though I find it too restrictive. Another option concerns black holes creating universes. Each one of possible billions creates a Big Bang into another plane of reality similar to ours. Since the material for creating these new entities might remain identical to the ones which created ours, one could imagine an almost infinite numbers of new worlds, each having its own parallel development. Probabilities would affirm possibilities of Earth similar to ours though with distinct evolutionary models.

      The second option relies on philosophy/theology. If we posit a Creator with unbounded powers for whom nothing is impossible, every ideas humanity might dream of, an absolute power can create since He has infinite power. If we consider our unbounded universe, other universes also unbounded exists all tending towards infinity. Under such an option considering an infinite number of universes, the probabilities indicate somewhere, in time, exists or existed everything Taylor Anderson brought to life.

      I understand many readers could object to the above possibility. However, many cases exist when artistic representations were proven exact. For instance, the type of Raptors in Jurassic Park (first film) larger than the paleontological remains found at the time were indeed uncovered some after the film aired. Another example: an animal discover later by other paleontological researcher did resemble (face wise) the Hogwarth’s dragon. At first, the specimen was named in its honor. How about dinosaur mummies? Soft tissues from a T-Rex over 66M years old with visible blood cells. Who would have thought it possible? Or the duck-bill Leonardo with mummified skin and stomach content?

      Anyway, there’s nothing to loose from my proposition. We I think of all the characters from the book, my supposition inform me they do exist, sometimes, some place, in one of an infinity of universes.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

        Parallel worlds hypothetically possible – at least, science currently knew nothing that would directly forbade them. Alternate history-type parallel worlds are more tricky; it is not clear, how they might come into existence (how exactly human decisions could be converted into mass and energy?), but well, we have little knowledge how exactly our Universe started, too.

        The most problematic thing, is travel between two parallel world. You couldn’t just took object from one & move into another; it would essentially cause the local change in vacuum energy. In the world from where the object was taken, there would be an area of less energy density than average, and in the world to where the object was moved – there would be area of more energy density. I’m not exactly sure, but it looks like as a perfect way to immediately destroy both Universes.

        There might be a way to avoid it, if the mass & energy transfer is compensated by counter-transfer (i.e. the object is moved from world A to world B, and equivalent mass & energy moved from B to A simultaneously).

        Reply
      2. AvatarBy Justin on

        An alternate universe doesn’t necessarily have to use the same physics ours does either. One could argue that in an AU a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, lightsabers could be a thing.

        And that means that Last Jedi and Rise of Skywalker actually happened. So that sucks.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

          Problem is, that it’s pretty hard to explain, why in “liquid vacuum” universe like Star Wars, planets have spherical shape and actually any orbital momentum… If “vacuum” here have enough friction to stop a spacercaft after it switched off the engine, than why not the planet?)

          Reply
          1. AvatarBy Justin on

            Well, there’s Newtonian forces… and then there’s the Force.

      3. AvatarBy Matt White on

        Taylor doesn’t have to stick to real physics to make it into a viable narrative device.

        The general rule of thumb with SciFi is that you have the “one big lie” where science or physics differs from reality that explains how things are different. In the case of the Destroyermen that lie is travelling to parallel worlds. In the case of Star Trek its the field of warp physics etc.

        For it to be a good lie it needs to be handled consistently. Bad ones become catch alls or deus ex machinas. The more believable or closer to real physics the lie is, the better. But consistency is most important. People are willing to suspend their disbelief for a lot.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Taylor Anderson on

          Thanks Matt and very true—though I prefer the “wait—what?” factor, or even WTFF over the term “Big Lie” in this instance due to extremely negative connotations of the latter. I’m not MAKING people believe it, after all. And it IS fantasy. That said, I do my very best to keep the “real” stuff as real as possible so grown up ps can choke the fantasy down.

          Reply
          1. AvatarBy Justin on

            Mission accomplished, then. The vast majority of readers are happy to think of the Squall as a magical, dimension-jumping storm and leave at that.

            For people unfamiliar with One Big Lie, see the relevant article: https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Mohs/OneBigLie
            And when you think about it, isn’t ALL fiction a form of lying?

          2. AvatarBy Matt White on

            Sorry I didn’t coin the term. It’s TV Tropes’ name for the concept. I do think it is a core principle of SciFi though and all good SciFi stories, your’s included, stick to it.

          3. AvatarBy Taylor Anderson on

            I know, Matt, and I was being a little facetious. I’ve got no problem with it in regard to fiction. I was—again, facetiously—referring to the historical context in which the “big lie” is deliberately used to shape public opinion for political reasons. These efforts have often been calamitous and have cost countless lives.

        2. AvatarBy Jeff on

          Robert Heinlein sorted this out decades ago in Number of the Beast. Authors can create physical reality at will, and do. Gives us all sorts of interesting crossover to contend with. A literary mechanism suits the layman better than a complicated scientific theory. Like Enterprise’s warp drive, it just gets us from point A to point B and I don’t worry about it too much – except when it threatens to blow up, which it seem to all too frequently ….

          Number of the Beast wasn’t his best book and its been a few years but I think in the end his characters almost caught HIM. Interesting twist. Part of the Lazarus Long series. Like Courtney, he came up with his Unified Theory of Everything. Heinlein managed to wrap up virtually everything he ever wrote in it and then checked out. Exit, stage left. Nicely done.

          Easy Taylor, no implications there. :) I think some more good stories from that universe are a safe bet.

          Reply
          1. AvatarBy Taylor Anderson on

            I absolutely loved Heinlein as a kid. My very first experiences with Sci-fi were “Red Planet” “Farmer in the Sky” and “Rocket ship Galileo”. I identified with his characters just as I did Jim Hawkins in “Treasure Island”. Those were GOOD adventurous reads for young people. Heinlein lost me when he got weird and kind of pornographic. And I moved on to other things, primarily wicked good historical fiction, but also other Sci-fi authors still steeped in wonder, discovery and adventure—with real heroes, not just anti-heroes that seem so depressingly over common today, to me. Recognize a theme here? I still honor Heinlein very highly and I’m not judging him. I’d probably like his later stuff better now but just never have returned to him. Oddly enough, though I was peripherally involved in the movie “Starship Troopers,” (there was some bleed over from that to “Rough Riders,”which I spent a lot of time on), I never actually READ it. Ironic, huh?

          2. AvatarBy Jeff on

            I got a 5-pack of Heinlein books as a kid for Xmas one year (still have it) along with a subscription to Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine. Have Spacesuit Will Travel and Starship Troopers are old friends. My gateway drugs. Yes, the man had some definite ‘issues’ and he got weirdly sexual in an uncomfortable way. Very uncomfortable. Number of the Beast is loaded with it but really does have a couple of relevant clever twists in it. Time Enough for Love is about the same but it’s a good enough story despite it.

            I moved on to Harry Harrison’s Stainless Steel Rat series after that, Asimov’s robots, Bradbury’s Martians. SciFi has occupied a lot of my time. Yet during all that my brother and I fought and re-fought WW2 more times than I can count in the back yard and that probably is where the crossover interest comes from.

            Oh – almost forgot – I bet Weird War comics had a hand in it too …..

      4. AvatarBy Mason M on

        I was always thinking of what would happen if someone came through who had read/had the Destroyermen books with them.

        Reply
    3. AvatarBy Taylor Anderson on

      Thanks Owen. I’m glad to hear from you—and glad you enjoyed it!

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Taylor Anderson on

        And Alexey—and everyone here (I haven’t made this announcement anywhere else and won’t for a while) but you will get another . . . Distinctive example of a crossover from a somewhat different perspective. As they say, the mere examples of a thing you have, the more you know about them :)

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Doug White on

          THAT ought to be ‘interesting’in every sense of the word Taylor!

          Reply
        2. AvatarBy Denis on

          Greetings to all. In fact I was wondering as I am still reading “Pass of Fire” if the mega-storm predicted by the skypriests might turn into a translation event. For quite a while. I have been waiting for such a case. Thanks for sharing the info Mr. Anderson!

          Reply
  15. AvatarBy Paul Smith on

    I don’t know if this was brought up before, but if the LOT came over in 1939, it had to spend, what 3-5 years “pacifying” the Med? Now if they should have any large scale reversal anywhere, and the news gets out to the “subject” people around the Med., I figure resistance to the regime will grow & become more active. Especially if there can be any foreign support for the resistance. Now if we can get a unified Grik nation under the CM, infiltrators/ expeditionary forces could strike north & west from the Grik areas of Africa & stir up trouble for the LOT. Also, how deep is the straits of Gibraltar in the destroyermen’s world? What sort of tidal race is there? Will it be possible to go in & mine the straits? To try & bottle the in the med? In this world, I know the straits are up to over 2000ft deep.

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Justin on

      Answering some of these risks a breach of the spoiler embargo; maybe we could come back in a few months?

      A military junta will definitely have its share of malcontents.
      Unfortunately, it could work both ways: the Allies’ll have to watch for League infiltrators, and for people back home willing to help them. Even worse for the Republic, which likely has French/German/Spanish/Italian enclaves here and there.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Matt White on

        How long do we want to keep the embargo going? IIRC last year we waited two months?

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Justin on

          Ain’t me, it’s Mr. Anderson. I’d be happy with one month.

          Reply
    2. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

      * I figure resistance to the regime will grow & become more active.*

      Doubt that. The League is simply not THAT bad. Their advanced technology clearly brought benefits for locals also, so the majority of populations is probably at least not actively against them.

      * Now if we can get a unified Grik nation under the CM, infiltrators/ expeditionary forces could strike north & west from the Grik areas of Africa & stir up trouble for the LOT. *

      For what purpose? Griks maybe friendly now, but they have no conflict with League at all, and most definitely would not want another one, after their empire essentially collapsed.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Paul Smith on

        Do we know what the make up of the peoples around the med? what sort of state they had? Can we honestly say the league wasn’t that bad? the league was alluded to doing some things not that much less atrocious than the dominion.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Justin on

          Pretty much all we know about the Med is that there’s a local population all around the coast, some in an ancient Tripoli, and that many in the League think of them as untermensch. That’s bound to cause at least some tension.

          Reply
          1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            To be exact, in 1930s nearly anyone save for France and USSR viewed population of their colonies as more or less untermensch. Some were more notorious, some less, but even USA were far from free of prejustice here.

  16. AvatarBy Robert D on

    Heya! I have a question for Mr Anderson, and no not that Mr Anderson….. I’ve been a huge fan from the beginning needless to say i have most of the books in hardback. Due to being a small business owner everytime a signing event came close to my area I was unable to attend. I was wondering, if i paid for shipping there and return shipping if you could sign the destroyermen books for me? If so I’ll buy the 6 books i have on kindle in hardback for the complete set.

    Reply
  17. AvatarBy Rich Owen on

    So, without giving too much away, any speculation on the two large blasts reported near the end of WOR? I have my own theories…

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Justin on

      Welcome aboard, Rich. Pretty sure we ALL have ideas about what two big blasts in 1945 could mean…

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Rich Owen on

        Thanks, Justin. Long time lurker; first time posting. I’m both relieved and sad that “Winds of Wrath” rapped things up. As it is, I’ve got to build another bookshelf to hold all 15 in hard-back. :)

        Reply
      1. AvatarBy Doug White on

        I have said it before but this comment ALWAYS puts a smile on my face!

        Reply
  18. AvatarBy Mason M. on

    Can they fit larger guns in Savoie?

    Alexey, you’ve been saying how dive bombers are a dead end, but don’t torpedo bombers become a dead end too?

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Rich Owen on

      The usefulness of dive bombers outlasted that of torpedo bombers. Even the Avenger (US mid-war/late-war) torpedo bomber was used primarily as a dive level-bomber and general ground attack aircraft. It saw relatively little use in the torpedo bomber role. Of course, that may have been due to the dearth of Japanese targets, by the time Avengers reached the front line is strength.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Justin on

        I’d guess “lack of targets” is the better reason; TBMs were key in getting Yamato to turn away at Samar, and later in sinking her.

        At any rate, I’m thinking that both types of attack will still be relevant in the DD-verse for decades to come. That is, until the Allies figure out how to make AP rockets and/or guided Yanones…

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Rich Owen on

          Justin, I agree. I believe Musashi took some torp hits before she when down, as well. One thing’s for sure, dive-bomber pilots had a better life expectancy against a reasonable armed target!

          Reply
    2. AvatarBy Matt White on

      Theoretically yes but the general rule of thumb is for every two inches in caliber you increase, you have to drop one gun. So you are limited in how large they could be made.

      You could probably get away with 14 inch rifles by boring the existing ones out not unlike what the Italians did to some of their older dreadnoughts. I’d question the utility. The thinner tubes would have a shorter life and I doubt a 14 inch would be that much more effective than the 13.something they have now.

      Probably better off designing a new class of bigger BB. Except the skipper isn’t a fan of BBs and wisely puts his faith in naval airpower. With planes that are actually getting to be modern, you’d have to be a big gun fanboy to argue for them at this point. Especially given recent results.

      Reply
    3. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

      *Alexey, you’ve been saying how dive bombers are a dead end, but don’t torpedo bombers become a dead end too?*

      Essentially yes. As soon as first US homing torpedo hit water in 1943, it became obvious, that now you could just drop torpedo from safe altitude/distance, and let her home on target by herself.

      Reply
    4. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

      *Can they fit larger guns in Savoie?*

      Theoretically yes, but it hardly would be very practical. She is quite… limited design; essentially, she have the same hull as previous Courbet-class dreadnought, but with larger guns.

      Thing is, that French Navy in 1910s was limited by the size of available drydocks. Most of them could not accommodate ships longer than about 170-180 meters, so this was the upper limit. The enlargement of the drydocks was planned, of course, but it was lengthy, time-consuming process. And France needed battleships now, to counter the Austrian and Italia ones.

      So, both “Courbet”-class, and “Bretagne”-class (of which Savoie is a member) were build already fairly limited. That’s why they received little refits during inter-war period; their small size and poor hydrodynamic made extensive overhaul… not impossible, but impractical. Anyway, they were good enough to counter Italian old battleships, and that was all that worried Marina Nationale.

      Placing larger guns on “Savoie” would demand rebuilding her turrets, shell-handling systems, and changing weight distribution. It would be very costly and complex. Frankly, I see no reason for Alliance to try this; her 340-mm guns are quite good, and French shells were of successful design (much superior to, say, British ones…).

      It is possible that Alliance would want heavier guns for their next-generation fast battleships – they clearly would want something 28-30 knots, capable of operating with their cruisers and destroyers – but they might as well stick with 340-mm guns.

      Reply
  19. AvatarBy Jeff on

    That’s the style Taylor !!!

    Thanks for everything !

    -Jeff

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Doug White on

      Buying the book today…dreading whoever it is we’re losing. But can’t wait to read it and get ready for whatever is coming next. Should I start morning the loss of Walker and Mahan now?

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Doug White on

        I cheated and read the last chapter….well that was interesting to say the least and now I REALLY gotta read the book. Interesting and Taylor I liked what you had to say in the Foreward and the Afterward as well. Very nicely done.

        Reply
          1. AvatarBy Doug White on

            I know….I am truly, well mostly, a little bit sorry?

  20. AvatarBy Tim Yentsch on

    I am waiting for my book to arrive tomorrow. Among other things I am curious to see if the Commandante Teste shows up. She is a 20 kt seaplane carrier in the French navy that could have been readily converted to a CVL She would have certainly been at Tripoli and if operational would be an obvious add on to the LOT fleet Less capable than the Bearn but still a major threat. By the way biplanes are still a LOT possibility as their lower landing speed would make them more suitable for a hastily developed CV

    There are several unexplored areas that could host major surprises. The East coast of the US , eastern South America and Russia are the primary areas likely to be inhabited and have substantial resources Whose side will they line up on

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

      *She is a 20 kt seaplane carrier in the French navy that could have been readily converted to a CVL*

      Well, frankly, Commandant Teste was essentially as capable as contemporary CVL’s – she could carry up to 26 planes, including seaplane fighters and torpedo bombers.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Mason M. on

        “There are several unexplored areas that could host major surprises. The East coast of the US , eastern South America and Russia are the primary areas likely to be inhabited and have substantial resources Whose side will they line up on”

        Well the League hasn’t been very friendly to anyone: humans are considered little better than barbarians, and the natives are animals to them. And any transferees that are not fascist certainly won’t join the league willingly. And fascists might not join for long b/c the league might try to subjugate them like the Germans as well, unless they have a significant force come through with them. So my opinion is that they either stay neutral, or go to the Allies who have enough territory that they could probably give them the ability to make there own country and be neutral anyway.

        Reply
    2. AvatarBy BigPony on

      Eastern South America is talked about a bit towards the end of the book. Cannot really say more than that without spoilering though.

      Reply
  21. AvatarBy Allan Cameron on

    Well that was intense. Kept having “Oh My God, they killed Kenny” moments, then realised what it all meant. Well done Taylor and thanks for the ride. Least I don’t the ‘wait till next year’ feeling at the end of this book.
    Allan

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Mason M. on

      All your talk about it is making me really hope there is a Barnes and Noble that is open and has the books in stock around my area

      Reply
    2. AvatarBy Taylor Anderson on

      Thanks so much, Allan. I guess you can tell that some parts were really hard to write.

      Reply
    3. AvatarBy Justin on

      Very much this. Though the scathingly cynical part of me thought that the last installment would kill Kyle, Stanley and Cartman too and feels a little cheated. The rest of me really liked it.

      You say that now, but wait ’till the continuation series gets announced right this November!

      Reply
  22. AvatarBy Justin on

    (no spoilers)

    “Old Folks’ Home”
    Downtown Baalkpan
    January 31, 1946

    *** OSI CLASSIFICATION LEVEL “GRI-KAKKA” ***

    Henry, good call on trying to predict the next Arrival. Here’s what we’ve got so far:

    15xx: Nuestra Senora de La Quezon; Caribbean

    17xx: Three East Indiamen; Indochina

    1847: Mexican-American war convoy; Caribbean

    1914: SMS Amerika; South Atlantic

    191x: Coal collier; Caribbean

    191x: Czech Legion; Caspian Sea

    1939: Giant-ass fascist fleet, part of Tripoli; Mediterranean

    1942, Walker, Mahan, Amagi, Santa Catalina, S-19, PBY Catalina; Indochina

    1944: Hidoiame; Japan

    1945: Japanese bombers?

    Analysis: As Bradford predicted, the rate of Arrivals definitely seems to be increasing. We’ll update as more information comes in, and let head office draw their own conclusions as always, but me and the others’ve put our heads together and come up with two competing ideas.

    If the blanks really are blank, Arrivals happen in bursts – short periods where they come in year after year, then decades or even centuries of absolutely nothing.
    That’s ~200 years, then ~200 again, 60-80, 67, and then 19-22 between the Czechs and League. Given another ~20 year pause, then a drop to 7 years, we can expect a REAL big dump in ’64, then another in ’77.

    If the blanks aren’t blank, then the next arrival could be as soon as ’48, or even this year.

    Recommendation: We need a bigger fleet.

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Neal Potts on

      It’s entirely possible that the squall is a constant thing and it’s only recently that new arrivals are better equipped to handle the unexpected thrust into a far more hostile world. The tragic element to this is how much the sea lanes and air corridors become congested in the coming decades. There’s a lot of traffic between New York and London which means there’s probably going to be a bone yard of ships and planes between the two locations on the Destroyermen’s world, assuming if there’s an ice sheet that close anyway.

      Reply
    2. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

      *Analysis: As Bradford predicted, the rate of Arrivals definitely seems to be increasing.*

      The other possibility, is that control is increased; i.e. chances of transfers to be noticed, and transferred personnel – rescued, raised up significantly with the establishment of League and Alliance. They are both advanced entities, that control significant parts of the world, and rather interested in gathering new personnel & technology.

      Reply
    3. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

      *Recommendation: We need a bigger fleet.*

      I should point out, that fleet of 1940s would be of very low value against anything hostile that may came from 1964-1977 time period. Technology marched on extremely fast since World War 2.

      While 1920s warships (like Walker) have some use against even 1940s warships, the 1940s warships did not have snowball in hell chances against ships of 1960s. The destructive power, range and autonomy of weaponry increased order of magnitude. Against nuclear-capable warship of 1970s, even the Alliance and League combined would have only a relatively small chances.

      Reply
    4. AvatarBy Steve Moore on

      Just seems to me that as discovered squall events occur closer together, they seem to be focusing more on ‘worlds’ that are near-clones of the DM world. Taylor has yet (OK, I’m waiting to ransom WOW from the grubby hands of the Lending Library) to introduce characters from a modern world entirely different from World Zero. (Republic of Texas doesn’t stop with Mexico, but conquers Central and South America…)

      Since the primary limitation of the squall seems to be no time displacement (1942 is 1942), we’re not going to see Fletchers and Gato boats coming through to match up with Burkes and Ticonderogas, unless they’re coming from Third World navies, like my uncle’s Fletcher that went to the Chilean Navy in 1962.

      Just thinkin’…

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Justin on

        Problem with that first idea is Imperial Germany winning in the Republic world, and fascism being popular in mainland Europe in the League world (should we start numbering these?). So it doesn’t quite appear to be narrowing down to the first timeline.

        Reply
      2. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

        *Since the primary limitation of the squall seems to be no time displacement (1942 is 1942), *

        Frankly, the time displacement took place by definition.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Mason M. on

          “*Since the primary limitation of the squall seems to be no time displacement (1942 is 1942), *

          Frankly, the time displacement took place by definition.”

          I thought that there was no time displacement, 12:30 pm August, 1945 on one world is 12:30 pm August, 1945 on the other. The only reason it might not be the same time when you get there being b/c it takes an unknown amount of time to transition (the up and down feeling).

          Reply
          1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            “I thought that there was no time displacement, 12:30 pm August, 1945 on one world is 12:30 pm August, 1945 on the other. The only reason it might not be the same time when you get there being b/c it takes an unknown amount of time to transition (the up and down feeling).”

            First of all, time is relative. There is no fixed time scale. But we could set it aside a bit, since we are talking about planets with relatively similar position in space & time, and similar velocities.

            Second, since the time in transit took place, it means that to arrive exactly on the same geographical spot, “Walker”, “Mahan” and “Amagi” need to travel backward in time. Otherwise the situation would start to look… problematic. Earth is moving, and 10 second difference is enough for the ships to either found themselves buried in the mantle, or thrown in space.

          2. AvatarBy Steve Moore on

            Alexey’s right, time is relative. But if everything is moving from world to world in one fell swoop, time stays the same relative to everything else in the squall’s bubble. So if you take a trip from the fireroom to the galley during the squall, Earl and the sammiches are still going to be there. However, if you’re in a different squall, might be different rules depending on the world you come from (10th century Romans). I’ll leave orbital mechanics to Professor Alexey.

            Halfway through the finale, and have gotten as far as Silva’s observations on child-rearing. But great so far, the best one yet, Taylor. Shot off some rockets this weekend in celebration.

          3. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            Thing is, that Squall must have enough intelligence behind, to be able to carefully and (mostly) harmlessly transfer objects.

    5. AvatarBy Matt White on

      I fear those might not be Japanese bombers. But something else.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Justin on

        Pedantically, the ones in River of Bones were definitely Japanese; their transimissions were ignored and they probably ran out of gas.

        But there’s no reason Enola Gay can’t show up later.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Matt White on

          Yeah I was referring to the unexplained massive explosions in Jaapan. Not the lost aircrews.

          Reply
          1. AvatarBy Mason M. on

            No spoilers as far as I know.

            Does it give dates and/or locations? If it does that might mean it was a 3rd and 4th bomb drop. Might want to send the Corps of Discovery to go investigate Iwo Jima, or surrounding islands, to see if there are 2 crashed B-29s there.

          2. AvatarBy Jake Delimont on

            On the explosions in Japan: I took that to mean that atomic explosions were world spanning events. Meaning the explosion shows up on all of the worlds simultaneously. There are going to be a lot of interesting explosions on some atolls that may or may not even be there in the destroyermen’s world in the near future if that’s the case.

  23. AvatarBy Mason McCormick on

    Google books has a search inside thing for Winds of Wrath that is not restricted to the preview. I also managed to find a “limited” preview that shows MUCH more than the original preview.

    Reply
  24. AvatarBy BigPony on

    Ok, I’m going in! Just got it downloaded on Kindle. I see very little sleep in my future the next 3 days or so 😁

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Matt White on

      My pre-order unlocked on google books this morning. Cant wait for the day to end so I can get started.

      Reply
  25. AvatarBy Justin on

    On another note: would Cat pilots keep their kilts inside the cockpit?

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Doug White on

      Watched on What About It’s life stream. They had astronaut Scott Paraczynski join them. Pretty fun stuff.

      Reply
    2. AvatarBy Neal Potts on

      Finally some good news for the year! A new step forward for our space aspirations.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Taylor Anderson on

        Yes indeed. Perhaps not as awe inspiring as a Saturn V liftoff, but maybe even more promising in the long run. Honestly, if you’d told me in 1969 that the US and Russians (preferably working together) wouldn’t already have thriving colonies on all the useful worlds and in the asteroids by now, I would’ve said you were nuts. But there’s money to be made in space and maybe it’ll take a commercial effort to get humanity back on track. I hope so.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

          Well, Tsiolkovsky Rocket Equation is pretty cruel. Space is costly to reach; Saturn-V was an engineering marvel, but its cost was simply enormous. In 1960s, the only thing that could really boost the space program was probably the placement of nuclear warheads on high orbit.

          Which, actually, isn’t a bad idea. Nuclear missiles on high orbit (geostationary, or semi-stationary) are the perfect retaliation weapon – enemy attack would took hours just to reach them, and in space it is very hard to hide such attack. On the other hands, high-orbit missiles are useless as first-strike weapon, because they need hours to reach Earth – and so the opponent would not worry about you suddenly attacking him.

          So essentially, nuclear missiles on high orbit are good for retaliation, but bad for attacking first – which essentially made them an excellent peace-keeping weapon.

          Reply
          1. AvatarBy Steve Moore on

            In orbit, there’s nothing to hide behind or under, unless you can make them stealthy in orbit and re-entry. Might as well put a bumper sticker on saying SHOOT ME. Subs and cruise missiles a little better choice, if we’re going to keep following MAD. Seems to me the enemies we really need to worry about are not the ones who depend on each other and share the same target circle, but those wo don’t really give a rat’s a** about humanity. Put ’em on the Moon, pointing outwards, make the best of Tsiolkovsky’s genius, whether for defense or exploration, and get them the hell off Earth.

            Oh, and those pesky little pantywaists at the UN and in Clowngress would probably soil their drawers over it. God knows what the EU would do, probably talk more about it or try to tax them since they’d be AMERICAN.

          2. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            *In orbit, there’s nothing to hide behind or under, *

            Exactly. That’s the whole point. Orbiting missiles are safe from sudden attack – such attack would be obviously visible long before it would reach the targets. And since the opposing side could observe your missiles constantly – they would not fear your sudden attack also. Much better than submarines, which are a constant threat of sudden strike by definition.

          3. AvatarBy Steve Moore on

            Somehow I’m not really comfortable with the concept that after I’ve been nuked, my robots will avenge me.

          4. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            *Somehow I’m not really comfortable with the concept that after I’ve been nuked, my robots will avenge me.*

            But this is what nuclear deterrence all about. As long as the opponent knew, that your robots would avenge you, he would not dare to attack. Frankly, this logic worked quite good for more than four decades of Cold War; both side knew that attack would be useless because opponent would retaliate, so they would not attack.

      2. AvatarBy Justin on

        Hoping SpaceX remains a contractor, though. If they start operating independently of NASA – or at least doing it without oversight – it’s only a matter of time before they start bringing xenomorph eggs home for study and blowing up alien villages…

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy BigPony on

          They already do work 100% independently of NASA on a few projects. Starship and Falcon Heavy.

          Reply
    3. AvatarBy Matt White on

      A truly historic moment. If it wasn’t for COVID I would have made the trip down to watch the launch. Maybe next time.

      Reply
    1. AvatarBy Taylor Anderson on

      No reason to shut up but just be mindful that people willing to post here are probably among the most invested in the story, technologically, strategically, sociologically—too many ways to list—and this MUST remain a haven they are comfortable visiting to kick their ideas around, confident others will respect their right to enjoy their own discovery of the storyline without someone arbitrarily tossing out major plot spoilers. I personally would never have countenanced such large “excerpts” anywhere, but the publisher did not consult me. On the other hand, if somebody, even here, wants to go look at them that is fine. Not all will, however, and dumping them here before the book is even released is not cool.

      Reply
  26. AvatarBy Justin on

    May just be PRH’s preview, but Chapter 1 appears to have three different typos: “Confdration” and “Confedartion.” Hope there’s enough time to head over to the publisher and sort things out.

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Justin on

      Nevermind, it’s just PRH. Probably an intern or something.

      Reply
  27. AvatarBy Paul Smith on

    If push comes to shove, could they mine the POF? Is the bottom shallow enough to hold the mines at the correct depth? Are the edges of the pass shallow enough to mine & force the league into a narrow channel & have enough hidden artillery to be able to damage/destroy the thinner skinned ships namely oilers, destroyers & repair/support ships.

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Justin on

      Most importantly, do they have weights and chains capable of withstanding the Atlantic flowing into the Pacific (and vice versa) twice a day?

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Mason McCormick on

        Well they have whatever they were using for the anchors on the seagoing Homes.

        Reply
    2. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

      I really doubt that League would attempt to force through enemy-controlled strait. Recall Dardanelles in WW1 – how the RN and MN blundered here! League clearly would knew better; and they have no real reason to even enter the PoF, actually.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Steve Moore on

        The strait would have still been there, but would the Gallipoli campaign have happened? Maybe Churchill got shot by the Boers?

        Reply
  28. AvatarBy Mason McCormick on

    The preview is finally out! Thank you so much Taylor!!! 😆

    Reply
      1. AvatarBy Mason McCormick on

        I just googled destroyermen book 15 and it had it for google books off to the right side. I can’t find it on my tablet though.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Mason McCormick on

          The google books didn’t have the maps, our history here or silhouettes. I feel like google cheated me! Plus bits of it were missing!

          Reply
    1. AvatarBy jbmedd on

      the exerpt you are describing seems to have more details than the one I found from penguin random house. where did you get yours from. Ive always just bought the audible version and I have never seen previews before the drop date

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Mason McCormick on

        All I know was that I googled destroyermen book 15 and it was off to the right showing the cover, some pages and preview in a blue box. It showed up to page 70 something out of 529 but had 2 pages from each chapter missing. It didn’t have the maps and silhouettes either.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Justin on

          Hey, nobody agreed to talk about ALL the preview. Especially not spoilers.

          Reply
    2. AvatarBy Taylor Anderson on

      No, spoilers here are still not OK. The preview is available but lots of people prefer to discover things as they read the book in their hands, or listen to it. We always have at least a month of no spoilers here.

      Reply
  29. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

    In PoF, Fiedler says: “in six months, perhaps a bit more, you can expect the Dominion to have the aid of . . .” He considered. “Perhaps three to five battleships, old and new, and at least that many light and heavy cruisers.”

    So they have about six months to get Savoie repaired & across the Pacific, along with whatever other ships & tech Reddy can scrape up. But it begs the question, how does a Ju-52 pilot from a fourth string, ill considered partner nation, become privy to the strategic deployment considerations of the LOT fleet? He might know they’re going to send something, but types & numbers? Either the LOT OPSEC sucks, he’s guessing, they’re feeding him disinformation to forward to the allies or some combination of the above. He may know what they have, but he should have little or no idea what or even if, they’re sending anything. After all, he was in the Indian Ocean when Gravois was making deals with the Doms.

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Mason McCormick on

      He was a pilot who was ferrying around intelligence officers who viewed him as unimportant and of no consequence if he learned anything from them. Also could of seen the ships while flying, and he is with a U-boat captain, so Hoffman could have helped him estimate. Then they are also intercepting League communications.

      Reply
  30. AvatarBy jbmedd on

    while I am sure we will see a new dive bomber variant I cant see it being overly effective given a lack of familiarity with the pilots and their lack of experience with LOT armed ships.
    I think Tara and possibly another of her sister ships will bring a fleet of MTB’s and PB-5’s . Use the PB-5s to scout ahead of the fleet as they have the legs for search patterns. Once the LOT is located get Tara within 200 miles then flush the MTB’s . Have them towed in lines of say 5 or 6 behind the destroyers to within their strike range of the LOT fleet. A night action would increase their chances and have them focus on the oilers and other supply ships. Then beat feet back to their tow ships to hitch a ride back to the fleet. Repeat as necessary. They arent subs but they make a dam fine Wolf Pack. you could build 100 MTB’s for every Savoie you could build. Obviously they would be useless if the sea kicks up .

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

      I didn’t like dive bombers. Didn’t like them at all. They are nothing more than a technological dead end, bring into prominence only due to particular combination of factors. Spending resources on something that would essentially be exercise in going nowhere…

      ” Have them towed in lines of say 5 or 6 behind the destroyers to within their strike range of the LOT fleet. ”

      LOT destroyers would have the day of their lives. All those nice, clumsy, defenseless and vulnerable MTB’s to run & tear apart… League destroyer commander who bring back less than five confirmed kills would be ridiculed.

      Seriously, motorboats are NOT the superweapon. They could attack large warships, yes, but they really bad against destroyers, who are faster than MTB’s, have better seakeeping ability and guns to destroy MBT’s.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

        Granting that dive bombers were an eventual dead end, at the time they were developed, they were the only game in town for accurate delivery of bombs. Especially against maneuvering ships. It’s still in use today in ground attacks, as a cheap, reasonably accurate, alternative to more expensive guided munitions. The technique these days isn’t an almost vertical dive anymore, but a more shallow diving run.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

          * It’s still in use today in ground attacks, as a cheap, reasonably accurate, alternative to more expensive guided munitions. *

          Actually no) The guided munition is a very cheap alternative of putting a very costly plane with a VERY costly pilot into the range of enemy AA systems)

          Reply
          1. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

            If your air force can afford it, yes. Many smaller nations can’t, so they still use unguided munitions dropped from relatively cheap platforms (close support aircraft usually). Even the USAF still uses “dumb” bombs regularly on the A-10 & other aircraft.

        2. AvatarBy Justin on

          In other words, glide bombing, which is what Union seaplanes are using right now… and which would probably get a lot of Cats shredded by League AA. Dive bombing appears to be right on the money for now.

          Though they’re definitely going to need a new airframe for it. Not sure what a DP1M1’s rip off speed is, but I don’t think it’s high. And I don’t think it has dive brakes either.

          Reply
    2. AvatarBy Steve Moore on

      MTB’s are an inexpensive weapon intended for use primarily against similar vessels or supply/transport vessels. That was the painful lesson both the Americans and British learned in WW2, and I think the Soviet Union had the same experience in the Black Sea. My background on that is somewhat fuzzy, so if you have any comment Alexey, feel free to step in and correct me.

      Even now, when MTB’s have standoff weapons, they’re still not as effective as 400 knot plus attack aircraft against larger ships; the only modern use I can see for them is brown-water operations.

      However, when it’s all you have, you can produce them cheaply, and you have a 19th century naval opponent, or fighting in night operations in restricted waters, they’re better than nothing.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

        “MTB’s are an inexpensive weapon intended for use primarily against similar vessels or supply/transport vessels. ”

        Er, MBT were not intended to be used against similar vessels. Initially they were designed as a means to attack enemy heavy ships near coastlines – i.e. as coast defense forces.

        ” I think the Soviet Union had the same experience in the Black Sea. My background on that is somewhat fuzzy, so if you have any comment Alexey, feel free to step in and correct me.”

        Generally our experience was, that hydroplanes are bad MTB’s. Our most numerous MTB’s G-5 series were build using a floatplane float as hydrodynamic prototype, and they were… troublesome. Still, they were quite good in harassing transport shipping, being able to hit-and-run against small convoys quite efficiently.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

          It would depend on where the engagement took place as to whether they could use the MTBs. On the open sea, they would be both exposed & too slow to catch the LOT fleet. They would be a viable option if the allies were planning their main action around a choke point of some sort. The MTBs could sortie from inlets near the action after the battle starts & attack while the LOT are distracted by whatever ships Reddy can scrape together to face them. At night or near dawn or dusk they would be next to invisible against a dark shoreline. Even if some of the LOT ships have radar, the early radars had difficulty picking out ships against shorelines, much less smaller MTBs. The WW2 Guadal Canal battles come to mind. We had radar & it didn’t do us much good at first. The Pass of Fire is one choke point option. It would depend on Taylor’s map to know any others, but between Florida & Cuba would be another possible site. It’s a fairly large area in our world, but with the lower sea levels there it should be considerably narrower.

          Reply
          1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            Let’s not forget, that Italians were the one who invented MTB’s, and one of the most efficient MTB users during both World War I and World War II. So basically everything Reddy might knew about MBT – Italians would knew better.

          2. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

            Knowing about their use & expecting/ready for it are two different propositions. Plus we don’t even know if Reddy’s bringing any.

          3. AvatarBy john medd on

            Another MTB option is for the nussies to be given the plans for an unscale full 80 foot elco . The NUS shipyards are of absolutely no use in buiding modern warships but they could rapidly build a mosquito fleet. They build the hulls and the alliance supplies the torps, tubes and engines. I assume with the improvements in engine designs they should be able to do 30-35 knots. The japs in WWII called them devil boats and that was with the for sh*t torps the americans were using. The alliance has shown their torps work and I think the range is now up to 8500 yards. In and around all those carib islands these would be a huge improvement over their existing fleet

          4. AvatarBy john medd on

            Also the nussies are predominately sailors so planes would take too long to train for and the same for a modern warship.
            An MTB would be easy to adjust to and give them the ability to immediately harass the LOT

  31. AvatarBy Justin on

    Come to think of it, we only know roughly how many planes the League’s got, but technically the limit of their capabilities is in how many trained pilots.

    If the League air force is understrength, then many of the M&Ms and bombers can be written off – they’re grounded without anybody to fly them (unless, of course, the League reinvents the Special Attack Units).
    But if they’re overstrength, then they’ve got spare hands to design, build and fly, and it might be a good idea to prepare for biplanes scattered among the moderns.

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Mason McCormick on

      Why not monoplanes? The Alliance managed them with less experienced people.

      Reply
  32. AvatarBy jbmedd on

    just read this puplisher summary on audible. “Undermined by treachery on a stunning scale, Matt Reddy must still steam his battered old ship halfway around the world, scraping up what forces he can along the way, and confront the mightiest armada the world has ever seen in a fiery duel to the death.”

    jeez Taylor outgunned at least three to one wasn’t enough you had to add “treachury on a stunning scale”
    man June 9 feels like a lifetime aaaahhhhhhh

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Mason McCormick on

      Try doing a countdown on a calendar, it makes it feel like time is going faster somewhat. At least you can get it June 9, I will have to wait a week or 2.

      As for the Worlds I’ve Wondered, Courtney doesn’t necessarily live. It could be something like what happened with Robert Jordan. Courtney could have a large portion of it done (He has had long periods of nothing to do on ships), then they finish it for him. I hope he lives though, his antics never get old!

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Steve Moore on

        Or, he can become the Alliance version of Eisenhower.I kinda like that idea… SPINOFF time? With Halik in the role of Tito; not an enemy, not a friend.

        Reply
    2. AvatarBy Steve White on

      It’s part of the “rules of publishing” — when in doubt, add treachery… :-)

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Justin on

        In this case, “treachery” is right on the money. Didn’t see THAT one coming.

        Reply

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