March 17

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Posted March 17, 2016 by Taylor Anderson in category "Uncategorized

4,303 COMMENTS :

  1. AvatarBy Joseph R. Thorsky on

    Taylor–Guys and Gals

    Am now in process of slow reading Mr. Anderson’s “Pass of Fire”
    Here’s A Highly Recommended Audio Playlist that further aids in the reading of Taylor’s The Pass of Fire
    The Albums
    BBC -The War Years 1-2-3
    Big Bands 1 to 10
    Big Band Hits of Glen Miller
    Body and Soul- Benny Goodman
    Homecoming 1945 1-2
    A Celebration of Chicago Blues Harp
    Chicago Blues Harmonica Project
    Blues is the Color- Meyer Rossabi
    Essential Blues Piano 1-2

    As Expected: So Far- So Good
    Exceeds Expectations!!!

    Reply
  2. AvatarBy Sam Rice on

    I really appreciate the growing complexity that Mr. Anderson is showing within the Grik and the Dominion and hinting at within the LoT. It lends a certain amount of credulity to the world the stories build to see that the enemy isn’t a monumental block of evil, but rather a product of twisted politics and culture. Of course this could be me simply showing my bias as a political science major, but as the war draws to an… evolution in the West, if not exactly an end, I see a lot of potential for the postwar Grand Alliance to have interesting internal development and conflict. We got a hint in Pass of Fire that perhaps the Republic’s Senate may be starting to balk at “excessive” war expenditures, the political reorganization is still underway in New Britain, and the United Homes of course remains a very new union. Then you’ve also got the Celestial Mother and her New Grik, as well as the liberated Doms. Based on the descriptions of the Grik and Doms, I honestly would expect their empires to break up into much smaller nations.

    The Grik Regencies already appear to act largely in this way, with the Celestial Mother acting more like the Pope did in Medieval Europe, holding the squabbling tribes of Christendom together in a loose alliance. That system seems unlikely to change, at least without significant resistance from the Regents. The Grik really don’t have the infrastructure to maintain a centralized empire as large as their rump regencies, and even if the Allies helped the Celestial Mother develop it the Grik would probably still need a large degree of decentralization. I’d expect the regencies which don’t comply with the Celestial Mother’s reforms to quickly acquire new Regents with the aid of her generals and the Allies, but that might well be the extent of it, especially with the Hij in the old city, and therefore the Empire’s intellectual capital, being so mightily reduced. Maybe they’ll develop into something like the European Union or even a tighter Confederation over time. Whatever happens, it will prove very interesting, and probably leave plenty of vulnerabilities for the League to exploit in the short term. I’m honestly kind of hoping that Halik, at the least, sets up a de facto independent state in Persia. He deserves it, and the Allies might support it as a mildly trustworthy buffer between India/the Czechs and the Grik.

    As for the Doms, we’ve consistently heard about local cultures who saw Allied troops as liberators. That implies something similar to revolutionary Latin America in our own world. You might see an attempt at a unified post-Dom state like Gran Colombia from our own history, but it would probably fall apart equally as quickly. The people oppressed by the Doms have been restricted from moving freely for so long, both by Dom oppression and limited technology, that you’ve probably got very distinct local cultures that just wouldn’t mesh well in a national government, especially as they try to assert themselves following such prolonged oppression. I doubt you’d see significant animosity with any break ups, though. The Grand Alliance wouldn’t want it’s bases threatened and the liberated Doms, with the exception of those in the former Dom heartland who seem more fanatically devoted to the cause, would all probably be too devoted to and dependent on the Alliance to risk breaking away from it. The most interesting thing, for me, is what type of government we’ll see the post-Dom states adopt. With the example of the UH, NUS, and New Britain with Rebecca’s reforms they might go for your standard New World democracy model, especially if any Destroyermen tell them about the Latin American republics of their original world, but it seems like the Doms only allowed for limited self-governance at the municipal level. They’ll have to build province and national level administrations from scratch, which is a task almost no revolutionary democratic government has done. With the help of the Alliance they’re probably up to the task, but I wonder if we might see any go for more traditional government forms, with powerful monarchs. After all, the Impies and even some UH states retain that form of government. Honestly, maybe that would cause the breaks between some local cultures, with some favoring monarchies and others democracies. Here’s to hoping the NUS, Impies, and Homes are willing to import lots of printing presses and Spanish translations of the US Constitution and Declaration of Independence! Get the idea of universal, unalienable rights across early and often!

    I’ve also had this recurring image of a Grand Alliance HQ building in Baalkpan, reminiscent of the UN building in New York, with all the member nation flags flying out front. Everything from the New Grik to the NUS. I blame that stirring description of the banners Captain Reddy gave towards the end of Pass of Fire.

    Something else to consider – this book touched quite a lot on the Vanished Gods and their remaining works, from the locks on the rivers to Old Soffeshk’s architecture. One line especially got to me, about the Vanished Gods entering the air and other worlds. We’d need to see more, of course, but I’d guess that the Vanished Gods aren’t myth, and might have something to do with why this version of Earth seems to receive so many transplants. Either that or they went space exploring! Either way I’m sure Mr. Bradford will gladly tell us more as he explores.

    All in all, a great read! Thank you! Reviews and ratings will be posted soon.

    Reply
  3. AvatarBy Taylor Anderson on

    Sheesh. The whiners always jump in, and can’t wait to get their gripes on record! Y’all know I always appreciate and encourage positive reviews in the various appropriate places, (if convenient), like Amazon, B&N, Goodreads, etc., because they really do help. And unlike some authors, I never run around begging for them, or generate them myself. On the other hand, negative reviews really do hurt, and in certain venues, are apparently even “counted” for more in their overall rating algorithms. I wonder if that’s selective? Anyway, when they’re sincere and reflect the opinion of the reader toward the story itself, I still just shrug. That’s fine, to each their own. But when they’re written in protest to the price of the book, or more specifically the Kindle, over which I have absolutely no control, (all major new release Kindle prices are too high, in my opinion), and poor reviews accuses ME of greed, for charging so much, I can’t help but take it a tad personally. So while absolutely not asking anyone to respond to such reviews–what’s the point?–I’d certainly encourage you to counter them with positive reviews if you meant to post them anyway. The early days of any release are always the most crucial from a quality perception standpoint, and those early bad reviews will haunt a book forever–just as early positive reviews tend to linger at the top of the heap.
    Thanks all, and sorry if I even seem to be pressing anyone to come to my “defense.” I’m not. But–if you like it–I’d appreciate it if you defend the yarn. Word of mouth has always been the best “publicity” for the D-Men series, and reviews are where it starts. Thanks, and sorry to even bring this up.

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Charles Simpson on

      This was the only complaint I’ve seen on the Assn page on Facebook
      “Cliff West
      13 hrs
      the one thing i do not like about this book…its the small maps.”

      Well that’s the publisher that lays out the maps and sizes then not Taylor, he has however sent large scale maps that are on the Destroyermen Wiki you can download or copy paste a file and print as big as you want for your personal use. They are located here:

      https://destroyermen.fandom.com/wiki/Special:Images?fbclid=IwAR36uyGZX8fhNexNpTYzww0Rem2KDtHX3XhFnvDni-uZWK48RmTpMJd8J-k

      Reply
    2. AvatarBy BigPony on

      The only thing I have to whine about is the wait for the next book as I read this one in 2 days, but I get what you are saying and will leave a review explaining your point on Amazon.

      Thanks and keep up the good work. We cannot wait for the next book about the “kitty people” which is what my boy calls the books when we listen on audio together (after I read them of course)

      xD

      Reply
        1. AvatarBy BigPony on

          I have to work, sleep and deal with the family though. That was about all the free time I had those 2 days I spent reading it 😀

          Reply
          1. AvatarBy donald j johnson on

            My wife complained about my missing 7 hours

    3. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

      Despair not Taylor, POF is listed as a Best Seller on Amazon. That’s endorsement by purchase voting right there. I threw my two cents worth in also, but it takes time for them to verify & put it up. Everyone else needs to get off their… OK stay on your butt & type a review when you’re done reading. Peace out.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy BigPony on

        Just that one guy who continues to think the pricing was set by Taylor Anderson, and despite several people (myself included) telling him that was not the case, he just will not believe it and is the lone 1 vote on Amazon.

        I reported his post as he called Mr. Anderson greedy.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy donald j johnson on

          some people are just CHEEP. I wish that I didn’t have to wait for the paperback. but i pay so i don’t have to wait and i won’t say that for many others. Went in and found another just released by another favorite and got it as well. Ended having to buy two for the price of one :-) 20% off on book + 20% off on a flyer + 10% b&n membership

          Reply
    4. AvatarBy Allan Cameron on

      Put my review up, but it is probably on Amazon. Co.uk rather than the American site.
      Allan

      Reply
    5. AvatarBy Steve Moore on

      Damn. Bad word, bad word, bad word. Mail did not get picked up Wednesday by designated household member, and I headed north to the mountains at 3am the next morning to inaugurate another season of mowing the fields. So I’m hoping that ROB has not already passed into the hands of the Lending Library. Thought I’d distracted him with a few Jack Reacher paperbacks, while another member has spirited away ROB, preventing my planned-for review so that I could search for detail in POF. Damn, damn, DAMN.

      However, Taylor, your books only continue to get better. ROB was the best one to date. All we can ask is that you don’t franchise it off to a ghost writer, even if it were to result in a New Year’s book to balance the summer solstice chapter. I’m happy, even if it was the Griks that got the bombardment rockets. I’m not going to read any further, here or on Facebook. I’d rather be pleasantly surprised. It’ll be a change from Space Marines and horny Amazons.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Steve Moore on

        PS. Household has confirmed. Brother-in-law down to last 20 pages, has not put down even to consume homemade blueberry pie.

        Reply
  4. AvatarBy Allan Cameron on

    Finished Pass of Fire last night after an all day sitting. Great as always Taylor, thanks for the work you put into it. Noe we just have to wait another year to see what happens next.
    Allan

    Reply
      1. AvatarBy Steve Moore on

        Damn. Was hoping that ‘is’ would be replaced with ‘was’. Ciano seems to have a head on his shoulders.

        Reply
    1. AvatarBy Taylor Anderson on

      Thanks Alan! Glad you liked it. Please post a review on Amazon, etc., if convenient. Since most of my “publicity “ has always been word of mouth, positive reviews are always helpful and appreciated.

      Reply
  5. AvatarBy Joseph R. Thorsky on

    How coincidentally reminiscent and considerate it is having Taylor’s “Pass of Fire” delivered
    In the same week that the Annual Chicago Blues Festival is being celebrated.
    In fact, I can think of no better place or venue to be listening to a real authentic Chicago Blues
    Jam session than those that used to be conducted on the fly by the local street characters who regularly used to congregate around and frequent the Maxwell Street Deli’s near Chicago’s Union Station. Pure Heaven was and will always be sitting on a Ford Ranger Tailgate along with one’s fellow coworkers and friends feasting on a menu of Chicago Blues and Smoked Polish or a Pork Chop sandwich. Its the only true antibiotic and curative that there is for revitalizing an ailing body, mind, and soul.

    TSk! Tsk! Tsk!
    Matthieu. Mattchew. Mattwho. MattWhew!
    Am so terribly sorry about the late response to your last posting, but family issues have suddenly come into play and will be demanding a lot of my spare time and attention at least until after July 11.

    He, He. He!
    If I’m not breaking the rules of the Embargo, I would like to leave you with some tantalizing
    Hints that you may wish to follow up on and investigate once the business of having
    Everyone having freely downloaded and have acquired pdf access to the book:
    How to Write Science Fiction and Fantasy by Orson Scott Card
    Writer’s Digest Books-F&W Publications Inc, 1990

    You yourself must come to recognize that It just won’t do at all for everyone to be fostering a thoughtless impulse decision-making environment based entirely on faulty imprecise and garbled communications. Whether I’m arguing Friedman and you’re arguing Keynesian when the data strongly suggests Barter economics. Fostering conditions leading to employing best practices should remain the ultimate mission objective.

    For Future Examination and Consideration:
    “The Universe of the Cities is full of these Ghosts.”
    “Remember Thor V”
    “IMT made the SKY FALL!”

    And so it came to be
    That the children of Albion lay
    Burnt to a cinder in the shade
    Hiding now from the sun
    That only yesterday they so much adored
    And absorbed.
    Peeling skins and aging grins.
    “Mad Dogs” and Englishmen.
    – David Lacey

    Later!

    Reply
  6. AvatarBy Adrian Sanada on

    I’ve finally gotten my hands on a copy of book 14! I’ve been looking forward to this book all throughout my spring semester of college. Now it’s time to become a recluse for a few days. Thanks for the read, Mr.Anderson!

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Taylor Anderson on

      Great! I hope you like it. If so, please post a review on Amazon, B&N, Goodreads, etc. They really do help!

      Reply
  7. AvatarBy Justin on

    Is the Spanish DD “Antunez” or “Atunez?” Found her spelt both ways in Pass.

    Reply
  8. AvatarBy Joseph R. Thorsky on

    Matthiew-Everyone

    Mr. Anderson has always demonstrated a tendency to be very unconventional
    in his writings. Knowing of this, how many Traditional Sci-Fi Fantasy conventions
    were not observed or strictly followed according to the tome
    How to Write Science Fiction and Fantasy by Orson Scott Card
    Writer’s Digest Books-F&W Publications Inc, 1990
    How many can you identify ordiscover?

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy matthieu on

      It’s MatthieU. Matthiew is just a mispronunciation from those redneck Saxons that we invaded in 1066. :)

      Well about the book, it’s not really a good one and Card is not my favorite author (and his Mormon tendencies are laughable. He can believe in what he wants but bullshitting us with that in books… come on!).

      So is there anything unique in the DM? Not really. The mix IS but each element existed.

      Reply
        1. AvatarBy matthieu on

          Indeed old chap, as “ressembler” is a french verb (you lost a S somewhere). :)

          Reply
    1. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

      Depends. We go through this every year. Some call for a month, some for two months or more etc..

      Reply
  9. AvatarBy Generalstarwars on

    So here’s a question about the home front. What kind of radio usage is there? We know the union has plenty of radios for military usage, so I’m assuming there must be some filtering back to the home front by now. Would there be any going to civilians? Enough to make radio shows possible? Or are they all going right into the meat grinder?

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Justin on

      I’m guessing “meat grinder.” The war’s consuming practically every resource, and even then some readers aren’t convinced that the Allies could actually field everything they have right now.

      After the war though, I’d expect a whole lot of SCRs suddenly flooding the markets.

      Reply
  10. AvatarBy Joseph R. Thorsky on

    Matthieu, Charles Michael:

    I would direct your attention to various passages from the book
    War Slang -America’s Fighting Words and Phrases Since the Civil War
    Second Edition by Paul Dickson
    Published by Brassey’s Incorporated 1994, 2004

    “Giving Bad Food a Good Name
    Revolutionary War An Introduction of Fire Cakes and Water
    Better as cannon fodder and substitute cannister than as an edible ration”

    Another recommended read that may be both instrumental and helpful
    in cramming for Taylor’s Pass Of Fire Release and as a primer for
    any contest story submission for the Destroyerme Wiki.
    How to Write Science Fiction and Fantasy by Orson Scott Card
    Writer’s Digest Books-F&W Publications Inc, 1990

    Can tamper a writer’s Artistic License in a tasteful thoughtful non intrusive manner.

    Reply
  11. AvatarBy matthieu on

    Today I was looking for some details about the crew of some destroyers and other ships.

    Interestingly I learnt a new meaning for an English word when I misspelled “crew” in a search about “navy crew men”. I discovered some highly creative activities when I wrote “screw” instead.

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Generalstarwars on

      What was it Churchill said about the three traditions of the navy? Rum, sodomy, and the lash? I think you may have just discovered the 2nd tradition.

      Reply
  12. AvatarBy Charles Simpson on

    Taylor wrote the following yesterday “… Only 11 days remain until the hardcover and Kindle editions of PASS OF FIRE are released! I can’t wait for you to read it since it is, hands down, the most epic and decisive chapter in the series.
    The disappointing news is that I’ve confirmed what some of you have grown concerned about: The Audio version will be delayed until August 12. The explanation is, through no fault of his own, the amazing Bill Dufris was unable to begin his performance on time. Faced with the choice of replacing Bill or waiting for him, the producers chose the latter–a decision I, and I’m sure all of you must heartily agree with. I’m very sorry for the inconvenience and added wait this will inflict on some of you but it really wasn’t anybody’s fault.”

    No change in book and E-Book release on 6-11-19, however the Audiobook is delayed until 8-12-19. I will post the maps and Identification charts from the book on the Destroyermen Wiki [Link to the image page of the Destroyermen Wiki: https://destroyermen.fandom.com/wiki/Special:Images ] Thus you can down load and print larger copies to have to hand while you read or later listen to the book. Taylor also included the latest PB-1F version of the Nancy that appears in the story that will also be posted.

    Reply
  13. AvatarBy Steve Moore on

    Just curious. I know Amazoom uses an algorithm on making recommendations, but some of their ‘suggestions’ get awful screwy. Latest ‘Freequently purchased together’ combines ROB, a spaceship saga with Marines and a chick sci-fi novel. Maybe the heroine’s a Marine too (pretty common in sci-fi now) but didn’t want to check to even suggest to Amazoom that I was interested in Hi-tech Harlequin romance. Have reread the series again waiting for POF. BTW, found Doc Stevens was a ‘lowly warrant’, in his words. Lost track of the Warrant Officer thread.

    Nice combination on the Walker/Gray DD, Justin. Centerline main battery the only way to go.

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Michael Clitheroe on

      That’s true I forgot that thread and that surgeons on destroyers would often be warrant officers rather than commissioned officers as on larger ships. Must admit can’t wait for the new book and am just about half way through my own re-read. My plan slowed down on re-reading as I’m also trying to catch up elsewhere with other books that are backlogged at the moment

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Steve Moore on

        Well, I have a ‘lending library’ of three patrons now, so it’s tough to assemble them all at once. Especially when there’s another book due and they’re asking every three days ‘has it arrived yet?’.

        Started hitting the library a few years ago just to reduce shelf space prior to retirement in a few years and found that you can get pretty near everything through the inter-library systems. It’s nice to have them on e-readers, but I’m old fashioned and don’t like to have my face stuck in the Kindle too much. And keeps the mix varied. Although as I mentioned before, the Marines seem to have taken over sci-fi. A notable exception is Craig Alanson’s Renegade series, which has an Army/National Guard grunt as the protagonist.

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy Michael Clitheroe on

          I find it very hard to downsize my library, thirty years of collecting and reading from classic, through military history to Sci-Fi alternate history plus as a research tool for my own hobby writing just would not know how to par things down. And thanks to situation in the UK our library’s are closing at one heck of a rate so I’d no chance.

          I think marines are seen as the general workhorse warriors in sci-fi ever since ‘Aliens’ I think if my memory is right.

          Reply
          1. AvatarBy Justin on

            Goes hand in hand with “ships” and “fleets.” If you’ve got a navy, you need marines, right?

            Thanks, Steve.

          2. AvatarBy Steve Moore on

            Navies need cooks, too, but not like Lanier…

          3. AvatarBy Steve Moore on

            Well, library’s got to fit in the RV, so I guess I’ll have to reconsider Kindle. Plus makes it easier to visit Europe.

  14. AvatarBy Big Pony on

    I wonder if it has been considered to approach A Company for the possibility of having this series brought to the screen? Like Netflix, HBO etc?

    Would love to see Destroyermen done in that fashion.

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

      It’s been bandied about on occasion & folks even named who they wanted to play the various parts. It’d be expensive as hell though & CGI would probably play a heavy part to keep costs down. The problem there is CGI can add to the story or totally destroy the show if done badly. Once it’s out of the author’s hands, the studio can really wreak havoc on the story too.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy Michael Clitheroe on

        That was raised when I suggested the same thing. It could be a great idea if handled properly. We start with a normal WWII drama with Walker etc fighting a desperate last stand before entering the squall. Then as the new world develops we begin to meet the new allies and enemies. Before we even meet a Cat we’d have gone through three episodes with the first few dinosaurs etc. once there things will get more complex and CGI plays a major part as with Terranova which went down the pan because of the CGI cost with so many questions unanswered. Still if done properly it would be great with the right cast of course

        Reply
        1. AvatarBy donald j johnson on

          A bunch of the fans could get together and do some. Taylor can do Silva

          Reply
  15. AvatarBy Joseph R. Thorsky on

    It’s funny how one can suddenly find oneself brooding over and contemplating about some previously unaddressed unanswered and still festering Enigmas, dangling plot twists and midcourse storyline corrections in the Destroyermen saga that have subsequently and inadvertently gotten me confounded perplexed and stumped when it’s this close to Taylor’s Pass of Fire’s publication.
    Consider:
    1 Did the LOT discover the presence or existence of the Pyramids in Egypt?
    2 Were the Lemurians the primary source and role model for their eventual construction?
    3 Was Tabby the role model for the Sphinx?
    4 Did the Rosetta Stone translations exist prior to, or did they come into existence as a direct result from a Destroyermen insertion?
    5 Safely assuming the existence and a faithful rendition of the Rosetta Stone’s translation from Ancient Greek to Egyptian hieroglyphics and, demotic characters can it also be said that there was a substantial Greek and Roman influence and presence that predates the LOT’s Insertion.
    Coincidently with this year’s Decoration Day-Memorial Day observances there also occurred on this same historically eventful day The Sinking of the German Pocket Battleship Bismarck in World War II and with The Japanese Naval Victory in The Battle of Tsushima Strait in the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-05.
    Both very significant World historical events.
    A Personal note here:
    There aren’t enough poppy flowers in this world of our own making that can ever match the incalculable human costs that had to be paid for just to keep our humanity from descending back into depths of barbarism and barbarity.
    Remember and honor all the Sacrifices Given.

    Reply
  16. AvatarBy matthieu on

    Trivia time n°2: the oldest songs.

    Why: we can assume that some old songs remained more or less unchanged in the destroyer world. For example some sailor songs might have remained more or less the same (thanks to Indianmen).

    So the topic of the trivial is: what are the oldest songs in the world

    1) What is the oldest hymn? Hint: more than old

    2) What is the oldest known piece of music with lyrics ?(honestly I didn’t know)

    3) The really complicated one: find the oldest military song (meaning used by any army in the world, excluding national anthems) still used by a current army. I’m wondering if you’ll be able to find something even older than me.

    You can also try per country: in the USA what is the oldest one?

    Reply
    1. AvatarBy Justin on

      Somebody doesn’t play enough Civ6, it seems!

      1) Hurrian Hymn No.6, a cult song for the god Nikkal from 1400-1200 BC.

      2) The Epitaph of Seikilos, a eulogy from 100-200 AD. Seikilos’ wife Euturpe died early, which inspired him to write a song about living your years to the fullest and without regret… and so he inadvertently granted the both of them immortality in our collective memory.

      Reply
      1. AvatarBy donald j johnson on

        They have found some very old songs in the sands of egypt, 3000 bce or thereabouts

        Reply

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