March 18

The Worlds I’ve Wondered

 

lizardbirdDiscussions on the History, Flora and Fauna of the Destroyermen World from the perspective of Courtney Bradford.

As time goes by, this is where I will collect the meat and bones of Courtney’s “book,” The Worlds I’ve Wondered, and eventually post it as a separate semi-static category, still subject to editing and addition.  Your comments and observations are welcome!  I’ll include some of Courtney’s monologues from the series (few of which have ever appeared in the audios) and may expand on them with pics, maps–the works.  Or I may add entirely different “chapters.”  Most important, this will be for us, and anyone who visits here, purely for our enjoyment. Feel free to contribute, within the guidelines set by the categories above.  Print it, bind it, whatever you want–for private, non-commercial use.  (I have to say that because the site is copyrighted, and so are some of the things I’ll post, such as maps, etc).  For that same reason, please do not post OTHER copyrighted materials!  They will be rejected.

I suppose contributions here could be considered “fan-fic” of a sort, so don’t create storylines for them.  At the same time, as I will freely share things here, you must consider your speculations and comments freely shared as well–or do not make them.  But do be sure to “footnote” yourself, as a “source” Courtney might quote in his book–in case your contribution gets included in the afore mentioned “semi-static category.”   Enjoy!

                                                           “The Worlds I’ve Wondered”

                                                                    Our History Here                                                  

By March 1, 1942, the war “back home” was a nightmare. Hitler was strangling Europe and the Japanese were amok in Pacific. Most immediate, from my perspective as a middle-aged Australian petroleum engineer stranded in Surabaya Java, the Japanese had taken Singapore and Malaysia, destroyed the American Pacific Fleet and neutralized their forces in the Philippines, conquered most of the Dutch East Indies, and were landing on Java. The one-sided Battle of the Java Sea had shredded ABDAFLOAT; a jumble of antiquated American, British, Dutch, and Australian warships united only by the vicissitudes of war. Its destruction left the few surviving ships scrambling to escape the Japanese gantlet, and for most, it was too late.

With a few other refugees, I managed to board the old American destroyer USS Walker, under the command of Lieutenant Commander Matthew Reddy. Whether fate, providence, or mere luck intervened, Walker and her sister Mahan, their gallant crews grimly winnowed by combat, were not bound for the same destruction which claimed their consorts in escape. Instead, at the height of a desperate action against the mighty Japanese battlecruiser Amagi, commanded by the relentless Hisashi Kurokawa, they were . . . engulfed by an anomalous force, manifested as a bizarre, powerful, squall–and their battered, leaking, war-torn hulks were somehow swept to another world entirely.

I say “another world” because, though largely geographically similar, there are few additional resemblances. It’s as if whatever cataclysmic event doomed most of the more frightening prehistoric life forms on “our” earth many millions of years ago never occurred, and those terrifying, fascinating creatures endured–sometimes evolving down a wildly different path. We quickly discovered “people,” however, calling themselves “Mi-Anakka.” They are highly intelligent, social folk, with large eyes, fur, and expressive tails. In my ignorance and excitement, I promptly dubbed them “Lemurians” particularly because of a vague, if more feline, resemblance to the giant lemurs of Madagascar. (Growing evidence may confirm they sprang from a parallel line, and only the most distant ancestor connects them to lemurs, but “Lemurians” has stuck). We just as swiftly learned these folk were engaged in an existential struggle with a species commonly called “Grik;”also bipedal, but somewhat “reptilian” with bristly crests and tail plumage, dreadful teeth and claws, and which were clearly descended from the Dromaeosaurids in our fossil record.

Aiding the first group against the second—Captain Reddy never had a choice—we made fast, true friends who needed our technical knowledge and expertise as badly as we needed their support. Conversely, we now also had an implacable enemy bent on devouring all competing life. Many bloody battles ensued while we struggled to help our friends against their far more numerous foes and it was for this reason I sometimes think, when I’m disposed to contemplate “destiny,” that we survived our previous ordeals and somehow came to this place. I don’t know everything about anything, but I do know a little about a lot. The same was true of Captain Reddy and his US Asiatic Fleet sailors. We immediately set about trying to even the odds, but militarizing the generally peaceful Lemurians was no simple task. Still, to paraphrase, the prospect of being eaten tends to focus one’s efforts amazingly, and dire necessity is the mother of industrialization. To this day, I remain amazed by what we accomplished so quickly with so little, especially considering how rapidly and tragically our “brain trust” was consumed by battle.

In the meantime, we discovered other humans—friends and enemies—who joined our cause, required our aid, or posed new threats. Even worse than the Grik, (from a moral perspective, in my opinion), was the vile “Dominion” in South and Central America. A perverse mixture of Incan/Aztecan blood-ritual tyranny with a dash of 17th century Catholicism flavoring the technology brought by those earlier travelers, the Dominion’s aims were similar to the Grik; conquest, of course, but founded on the principle of “convert or die.”

I still believe that, faced with only one of these enemies, we could’ve prevailed rather quickly. Burdened by both, we were unable to concentrate our forces and the war lingered on. To make matters worse, the Grik were aided by the madman Kurokawa who, after losing his Amagi at the Battle of Baalkpan, began to pursue an agenda all his own. And just as we came to the monumental conclusion that not all historical human timelines we encountered exactly mirrored ours, we began to feel the malevolent presence of yet another power centered in the Mediterranean. This “League of Tripoli” was composed of fascist French, Italian, Spanish, and German factions from a “different” 1939 than we remembered, and hadn’t merely “crossed over” with a pair of battle-damaged destroyers, but a powerful task force intended to wrest Egypt—and the Suez Canal—from Great Britain.

We had few open conflicts with the League at first, though they seemed inexplicably intent on subversion. Eventually we discovered their ultimate aim was . . .

Excerpt from the Forward to Courtney Bradford’s “The Worlds I’ve Wondered”

University of New Glasgow Press, 1956



Copyright 2017. All rights reserved.

Posted March 18, 2016 by Taylor Anderson in category "The Worlds I've Wondered

335 COMMENTS :

  1. By Joe Thorsky on

    Following up on everyone’s recent postings.
    There still remains a strong likelihood that
    other nation-states naval powers also had their
    own asses(t) that were also engulfed and
    transferred with the LOT.
    Another salient point to consider is the mother
    natural development and formation of a black market
    pipeline of LOT technicians, technology, Savvy(oi)
    spare parts and intelligence transfers flowing from
    the NUS to the Alliance.
    A NUS Black market could be a 4-saleable working avenue
    and solution

    Reply
    1. By Steve Moore on

      In BITW the Admiral on the Savoie is musing on the fact that the LOT factions don’t get along; maybe part of their threats are internal as well? He also notes that the LOT does not have ability to replace airframes, so that speaks to their state of industrialization.

      The LOT has their eyes on the RRP as a conquest, not just as a pawn. Controlling that choke point keeps the Alliance bottled up in the Indian Ocean, and prevents them from exploiting the resources of West Africa (probably a prime target of the LOT)

      As for battleship in the desert; you’ve got other battleships, send the slaves to strip it and go back for it in 1954. Better use for slaves (and the guns) at coastal defense batteries at Gibraltar.

      Reply
  2. By Steve Moore on

    Guy’s, I’m learning a lot just sitting here reading your posts. All of you are right.

    The one thing I’m thinking about, though, is that the CES task force (that turned into the LOT) was an invasion force. Yeah, a few administrators as I mentioned before, maybe some political types to find the Quisling types and a good deal of intelligence types like Gravois. But most of the REMF’s are still sitting back in harbor waiting for the point of the spear to do all the hard work. And they’re still sitting there 5 years later, unless the Brits took advantage of a staggering blow to the CES fleet to take over the Med.

    It would have been great if Walker could have dragged the Blackhawk or Canopus into the new world with them, too. But they didn’t. What they did have was living through the Depression and serving in the Asiatic fleet, both ingenuity builders. I’m sure the same went for Europeans.

    That said, I’d like to see them get to work with the tools they have; their minds. Stokes and his department need to get to work on:

    1. Introducing some ‘fifth-column’ Griks back onto the mainland, once they’ve seen how the Alliance will treat them, to stir up trouble among the Hij. Maybe take a delegation north to meet with Halik. Take him some less lethal toys, like motor dories or cargo rickshaws, to help him in his conquest.
    2. Consider offering the Gentaa a colony of their own in Grik City, or even Zanzibar. Why? At the turn of the 20th century, Zanzibar was a major trading post, trading cargoes from the interior for goods from half the world.
    3. And here’s the kicker. If the Alliance can get a change in regime, even leaving the CM (just dumping Esshk), and get the Grik to focus on inland Africa, that puts a lot of the mineral resources of Central Africa out of the hands of the LOT. Given the chance to mature, and not be slaughtered for the pot, the Grik might evolve. Esshk sure doesn’t want them around to challenge his post-war rule, so, find a way to get rid of him.

    Jeez, I can feel those keyboards heating up already…

    Reply
    1. By Justin on

      1) Doubt that there’s many captured Hij (don’t bother getting an Uul to spy), much less any cunning enough to establish an OSS or MI6.
      An ambassador to Halik, on the other hand, makes perfect sense – best to get the “King in the North” on the Allies’ side once they move on Africa.
      2) The Union seems to want to pack up everything in Zanzibar and leave, and Grik City’s a bit of a fixer-upper… maybe the Republic could give the Gentaa part of Mozambique?
      3) Agreed entirely. Maybe the Union installs their own Grikess as CM, or the current one grows up fast (with Allied help?), or the Sa’aarans/Khonashi take over; whatever the case, the Grik Empire is most likely going to turn into an Esshk-less protectorate.

      Reply
      1. By donald johnson on

        //Doubt that there’s many captured Hij (don’t bother getting an Uul to spy), much less any cunning enough to establish an OSS or MI6.//

        Don’t forget that we already have at least 1 grik that IS smart enough to form a spy network and he already has been spying for us since india.

        Reply
        1. By donald johnson on

          since due to the extremely high birth rate of the Grik allowing them to build very large army’s fast, we do need to get them on our side especially now that they have used their intelligence to build a smart Grik fighting team.
          Depending on what is happening in north Africa they may already have a two front war and realize that it is not a winnable war.
          The real smart Grik have already realized that they only have two options, surrender or die. They will soon have to come to the consensus that they cannot beat the alliance or the league so will have to surrender their great hunt and join either the league or the alliance. We need them to join our hunt so as to have a buffer between us and the league at the least.
          If they do decide to allow them to join we need to understand that they have a form of honor that in not like that of the humans. Theirs allows them to join with an enemy but if they feel threatened as a race they will just as quickly switch sides. We must make sure that they do not feel threatened by us after their surrender should they join us and conversely we should be prepared to attack immediately should they decide to join the league.
          We also need to realize that their idea of a diplomatic team is not like ours. Their teams expect to be eaten should their terms be rejected. It will most likely be hard for them to accept that they should allow our team to return alive with their decision lest we get pissed enough to decide to just destroy all of them regardless.

          Reply
    2. By Alexey Shiro on

      //Given the chance to mature, and not be slaughtered for the pot, the Grik might evolve. Esshk sure doesn’t want them around to challenge his post-war rule, so, find a way to get rid of him.//

      The problem would be the population pressure. Don’t forget; Griks are carnivorous, and if ALL Grik would became Hij… basically, they would soon be forced to press on Alliance just because there isn’t any other way to avoid starvation. Predators MUCH, MUCH less “cost-effective” than omnivorous; while humans and Lemurians could use agriculture, Griks are forced to rely on cattle – and the same land area could feed much more humans/lemurians directly through the agriculture, than indirectly through stock raising.

      Reply
      1. By Charles Simpson on

        It was noted the Goop Soup of the Grik contained vegetables perhaps even cooked grains. So Grik are not pure carnivores. Their problem is an unsustainability high birth rate. Eating undesirable young is one solution. Likely some form of infanticide or other is in their future to create a balanced population.

        Reply
        1. By donald johnson on

          If the Grik learn to grow grain for their herds then there will not be as large a population pressure as a purely hunting society. We will need to teach them how to grow grain foods for their herds.

          Reply
          1. By Alexey Shiro on

            //If the Grik learn to grow grain for their herds then there will not be as large a population pressure as a purely hunting society. We will need to teach them how to grow grain foods for their herds.//

            Still this means that from the same ammount of land could feed several times more humans or lemurians than Griks. Simply speaking – using the cattle as food is less energy-efficient than eating plants. Because the energy and nutritiens usage is far from 100% effective. So, to recieve from animal meat the same ammount of calories than from 1 kg of grain, we need to feed the animal SEVERAL kilograms of grain.

        2. By Alexey Shiro on

          //It was noted the Goop Soup of the Grik contained vegetables perhaps even cooked grains. So Grik are not pure carnivores.//

          That’s next thing to impossible. They could use vegetables as food supplement, but their major ration has to be meat. They are decendants of carnivorous dinosaurs, and their teeth are completely unsuited for vegetarian diet.

          Reply
          1. By Charles Simpson on

            Cooking takes the place of dentition developed for plant eating. Legumes can provide higher protein in the diet too.

          2. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

            Not impossible. Many bird species are omnivores and beaks aren’t good for chewing either. And remember, when practicable, the Grik use cookpots, likely making stews (with lots of crunchy bones). But my point is, all sorts of grain and vegetable matter can be added to stews and eaten or slurped quite successfully by things with long sharp teeth. The “cookpot” is clearly a long-established feature of Grik culture. I’m not saying they DO eat beets and taters, maybe the goop soup was the same thing the scrawny Japanese were eating? But they could, and may have been doing it for thousands of years. Just a thought.

          3. By William Curry on

            Cooking also breaks down the cell wall in food making the nutrition easier to digest and thus more available. This was one of the technological advances by our hominid ancestors.

      2. By Steve Moore on

        Perhaps find a way to turn the Great Hunt inwards towards Darkest Africa, hunting the radish chick (or however you spell it, SpellCheck doesn’t work with Grikish. They were herders in India; maybe Matt can help them organize an African version of the Chisolm Trail

        Reply
      3. By Justin on

        Existing Grik birth control seems just as inefficient as it is appalling.

        They already practice infanticide, cannibalism, social Darwinism and conquest just to keep the population down… destroying one in every three eggs, while almost as morally ugly, would probably work better.

        Reply
  3. By Justin on

    What do the Flashies eat, other than shipwreck victims? It seems that with a (so far) 100% kill rate, they’d have chased away or consumed all the available small prey in the vicinity and therefore have gone extinct.

    Reply
    1. By Steve Moore on

      At 2 to 4 feet long, they’re comparable midgets and probably look like kippers to a lot of the larger sea life. My dad was fishing off Florida many years ago, hooked a barracuda and hauled up the front half…

      But maybe that’s the solution to the diving problem. Start chumming up the other side of the harbor on the outgoing tide, attract all the flashies, and let the larger predators have snacktime.

      Reply
      1. By donald j johnson on

        The flashes are very prevalent along the shorelines but are they still prevalent in the middle of the ocean where there is no areas for their prey to hide. It is my feeling that aircraft that crash in the middle of the ocean will give the pilots a reasonable amount of time to get into a life raft and if they don’t kick around in the raft the flashes when they finally do arrive if they arrive will not be as aggressive because it’s not moving and they love moving targets like a freshly inflating raft

        Reply
        1. By Steve Moore on

          Good point, Don. If they’re going down near shore they’ll make whatever effort they can to bail out over land, but I believe the PBY raft incident was at sea. Then of course there are always the sharks in all sizes… maybe they could experiment with some kind of flashie/shark repellent. Start with the P.I.G. Tobacco company and their stores of brontosarry urine!

          Reply
          1. By donald johnson on

            yes it was at sea but inshore areas were involved. i remember reading the incident but also remember that they were near the shore in perfect flashy waters. wish i had the book easily found but i have too many books

    2. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

      //What do the Flashies eat, other than shipwreck victims?//

      Plenty, actually. Tuna sized, (as described and to answer earlier misrememberings), they school the same and move much the same but they ARE more locally ubiquitous due to a sea that generally just has far more life of all sorts in it. Characters might speculate from time to time but none of them are oceanographers–Hell, I’M not an oceanographer! I’m a novelist writing an adventure yarn!–but hints abound about the fecundity of the sea, down to numerous references to phosphorescent wakes EVERYWHERE, not just in certain predictable areas. Perhaps instead of speculating about “why so many Flashies” the question should really be “why so much megatonnage at the very bottom of the food chain?”
      And like any predator, Flashies have local “boom and bust cycles.” These need not be worldwide because they would come at different times in different areas and there have been casual remarks like “there didn’t seem to be as many Flashies around here” from time to time, but again, I’m not going to present a dissertation regarding WHY because nobody but those interested enough to visit here are going to care, and the occasional offhand observations by characters who don’t know and don’t care (being in the water is bad whether there is a small or large Flashie–or THEIR predators–population) are enough to cover my butt in the eyes of the casual reader. :)
      Here, however, is an excellent place to wonder about such things and discuss them at whatever length we desire!

      Reply
      1. By Alexey Shiro on

        Hm… the League, probably, have the largest number of scientific personnel avaliable… I wonder: does the League already established sort of research institution? After all, they have a whole new world to live… and they desperatedly need to understood it, if they wanted to rule it.

        Reply
        1. By Justin on

          Doubtful – while tagalong scientists would be commonplace in the Age of Sail (or on an old destroyer fleeing the IJN), invasion forces don’t really have a need for them. The League’s intellectuals, if any, are most likely specialists and ex-professors from among the military.

          Reply
          1. By Steve Moore on

            Agree with you, Justin. The only other thing they might have is a couple of old merchant officers or fishermen for inshore pilots. That and weathermen.

          2. By donald j johnson on

            I would have to go along with Justin and say that yes the league will have very few scientists in it’s your time personal except those that were drafted because unlike in the age of sail where they’re exploring the league is doing nothing but conquering and have no need for a scientist.

          3. By Justin on

            All three of us agreeing on the same thing? What sorcery is this?!?

            Not saying the League’s just a bunch of angry old admirals and dumb grunts – probably engineers, industrial types, and maybe a few science teachers-turned-conscripts – but definitely not enough (spare) brainpower to set up a university.

          4. By Steve Moore on

            Colonial administrators as well, plus probably a few civil engineers since they are after the Suez Canal. The Nile probably still needed flood control in their world. Not to mention building or repairing airfields, docks, etc. Wonder if the French controlled Syria and Lebanon, the Brits Iraq and Arabia, in the CES world. Not to mention photographers and journalists. And, since the French and Italians are key members… chefs! 😉

          5. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

            //while tagalong scientists would be commonplace in the Age of Sail (or on an old destroyer fleeing the IJN//

            Not sure what you mean by this? I assume it implies again that there was too much general knowledge on Walker? Hmm. I will defend–again–that the closest thing to a “scientist” aboard was Courtney, and he was of a sort similar to what you describe as confined to the “age of sail.” Not a generalist, but a man with wide experience and interests, curious about everything around him. Mallory, like many college-educated aviators at the time, (emulating his hero Jimmy Doolittle), did major in the relatively new discipline of aeronautical engineering, (though many forget that, despite the rapid aeronautical advances throughout the early 20th century, most were made WITHOUT the benefit of formal education in the field). Doolittle was the first to get a PhD. (at least that I know of, and certainly in the US). Mallory’s presence aboard was certainly not unrealistic since many of Langley’s survivors did attempt to escape aboard Pecos and some of them may have wound up on Edsall. Had he (fortunately for him) missed Pecos, Captain Reddy would not have left him behind. In addition, many officers, even in the Asiatic Fleet, were graduates of the Naval Academy where they would not only have received a good general education, they would have learned a great deal about the technical aspects of their profession.
            Anyway, I digress–sort of. Often forgotten is the fact that, despite a lack of formal education, generalized knowledge/ingenuity/individual industriousness–IE, the ability to DO stuff–was far more prevalent then than it is today. This is perhaps difficult for younger readers to accept since they definitely have the RESOURCES ready at hand (literally) to discover more than folks did back then, but most don’t KNOW as much and definitely don’t have the broad wealth of applied knowledge and experience at doing things with their hands and with manual machinery that is not dependent on CMC tech. Add to this that all the characters had these diverse backgrounds and lives (in which they learned valuable skills) before they ever even joined the Navy. I’m often castigated for how “convenient” it is that the Mice knew how to make a Ft. Worth Spudder to find oil. Really? My dad–like many strong, likely lads in the 30s and 40s–worked in the oilfields before he joined the Army. After his initial stint with an anti-aircraft battery (quad fifties on a half-track) he joined the Signal Corps. (He’d also worked in a radio station as a kid). He became a pilot and spent the rest of his career in leading edge communications, ultimately gaining a PhD in that. Shoot, I was a roofer, rock hauler, ranch hand, machinist and auto mechanic before I ever went to college–after which I went back to being an auto mechanic for a while, with a MA in my pocket!
            Finally, regardless how insular they may have been, or possibly even because of it, have you ever noticed how well-spoken people used to be, and able to discuss advanced technical aspects of their area/s of expertise–while barely being able to write? The better use of language stems from being around people who spoke well and possibly HAD to be able to communicate better because they couldn’t write! And those who could . . . Look at some old letters sometime. Not only will you find some pretty wild misspellings, you’ll usually find excellent, careful handwriting and almost poetic prose, written with very large words, regardless of the spelling irregularities. Most interesting is that those who COULD write left a legacy of achievement and discovery on which “scientists” have since built.

            Sorry for the rant, but my point is, there is absolutely nothing unusual about the level of expertise USS Walker, Mahan, and S-19 brought to this world. And though the innate “Yankee Ingenuity” of the time has doubtless been overblown, it did exist. More importantly, (and pertinent to the discussion), it didn’t only exist in the US. Why assume that the League would require a vast number of “tagalong scientists,” “intellectuals” or “ex professors” to achieve a great deal? There may be mitigating circumstances that might cause a degree of industrial lethargy within the League, (or the reverse), but the Allies will likely base their assumptions regarding what the League is capable of upon what THEY have accomplished. Hopefully they will plan accordingly.

          6. By Lou Schirmer on

            Someone may have been poking an anthill hoping to get a rise out of someone else. Not that I would do such a thing of course. (insert pious look here) 😉

          7. By Justin on

            Who’s baiting who?

            A) There were more than a few Scholars of Great Renown hitchiking on EIC/Navy vessels back during the 18th and 19th, which justifies the Empire’s and Republic’s tech bases.

            B) And back in ItS, everybody was piling on any ship that could get them away from the Japs, which justifies the Union’s tech base.

            C) Not much of a reason for a professional scientist (civilian contractor, maybe) to be riding to enemy territory via invasion fleet, so there’s little to no chance the League has one too.

            Yeesh.

          8. By Steve Moore on

            Taylor: you point is made by none other than Dennis Silva.

          9. By Matthieu on

            The main thing for me is that people at that time only had to master simple technologies. I don’t say that they were ibvious but the logic is very easy to understand. You can explain the logic of a steam engine to anybody and it’s easy to work on cars as long as it’s only mechanic.

            Nowadays the knowledge is so advanced that we only master a tiny part of it and the really advanced stuff is so complicated that you can’t do anything intelligent in this field unless you have a huge team, access to incredibly complicated to obtain resources and advanced plants.

            Example: if you master WW2 engines, you can understand how you can produce a new one. The problem is in the “hidden” knowledge: being able to draw blueprints, being able to take into account tolerances, being able to design an oil-proof system and so on.

            Nowadays if you want to create a GPS you need access to space rockets, atomic clocks, take into account relativity in computations, advanced microelectronic, advanced signal processing, 15 years of development, billions of dollars and 1.000+ engineers working on the main system (and I don’t take into account sub systems nor the launch system).

          10. By Matthieu on

            ” Not much of a reason for a professional scientist (civilian contractor”

            Civilian contractor? This is not 2017. Incredibly uncommon before (and even nowadays it’s almost only in the US navy). You forget that deck officers were supposed at that time (and even know) to have a really good level in maths. This is needed for computations (no calculator!), navigation and so on. Technical officers are most of the time equivalent to engineers when it comes to their trade.

          11. By Steve Moore on

            Looking at the political and economic aspects of the ’30s (in our world and the CES world), you probably had a lot of people of all sorts jumping to the fascist (little f) cause for a meal ticket and for their own advancement. The US Navy, and the British, wouldn’t have been as political, but you had people like Werner von Braun happily becoming Nazis just to ride the technology and finance bandwagon. So I can see more than a few engineering types in the entire Confederation task force that got sucked in.

            As to Taylor’s and Matthieu’s points; I think there’s a middle ground. Yew, the 21st century has brought vastly new technologies, but a good portion of the world still runs on 19th and 20th century technology. You can’t make rockets without machinists.

          12. By donald johnson on

            not wanting to “Bait” any one but we need to realize that the first GPS type system was up and running by the late 60’s. My uncle was telling me about an incident on his oil drilling ship as they were getting ready to drill the MOHO bore in the Puerto Rican trench.
            The ship was tied up to the dock and he was offhandedly checking the ships position daily for comparison purposes. After a week of 1 to 2 foot variance the ship was suddenly one day 150 feet from its position. After careful checking he found that they had moved the GPS antenna to another location on the deck that had better sky visibility.
            Agreed that this is only 25 to 27 years after the present walker but shows the potential of knowledge increase possibilities.

          13. By Alexey Shiro on

            //not wanting to “Bait” any one but we need to realize that the first GPS type system was up and running by the late 60’s.//

            You mean, Transit/NAVSAT? One problem: it required sattelites and doppler-capable recievers.

          14. By Justin on

            //Civilian contractor? This is not 2017.//

            Seeing as the military’s been using civvies in non-combat roles since the Thirty Years War (and probably long before that), it doesn’t have to be.

            //Technical officers are most of the time equivalent to engineers when it comes to their trade.//

            So they’d know how to survey and drill oil? Nein, they’d have a couple maps of where the British oil fields were, and maybe a few ex-drillers like Isak and Gilbert if they’re lucky.
            Or how to dissect a Flashie? Auch nein, they’d need a biologist or ex-teacher to come along (for whatever reason).

            Not disparaging technical personnel, only saying their knowledge only goes so far.
            Just imagine where the Union’d be without a Shell contractor along for the ride; likewise, the League’d need a half-dozen guys from Agip, Macchi-Messerschmitt et all to have enough spare brainpower for Alexey’s research institute.

          15. By William Curry on

            Lindbergh flew in combat in the South Pacific and shot down Japanese aircraft as a “Manufacturers Technical Representative” during WW2. He was on FDR list of non-people for being part of the America First Movement before Pearl Harbor, so while having a commission in the US Army reserves, he wasn’t recalled to active duty. During the Indian Wars in the 19th century, the scouts utilized by the Army were civilians as were wagon drivers. At least one civilian scout (Billy Dixon) was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions. When the aircraft carrier damaged at Coral Sea was repaired at Pearl Harbor and left for Midway, there were civilian shipyard people on board. When the Thresher sank in 1963, civilian technical people were on board. The US Military has a long history of using civilian tech people in or near combat.

          16. By donald johnson on

            yes it did but in the 40’s even the usa had not considered satellites. and transit was a gps system though that name did not say GPS it was the first GPS system

          17. By donald johnson on

            All of Williams references are USA and though they do represent the USA they do not necessarily represent the rest of the world. I do agree that most officers in most western navy’s were capable engineers they would not be specialized except where they were working ie. Gunnery, propulsion, navigation, communications etc. and yes there will always be hobbyists that would have some specialized knowledge. So far the destroyermen have been real lucky but had they had even one good amateur radio operator with the necessary knowledge required for getting a licence then they would have been much better off in the radio department for example.
            I do hope that they can find a few books in one of the ships or other craft that come through. My uncle who was a navigator in WWII always had a geology book and a handbook of chemistry and physics with him as reference books to help him as he was actually a geologist from just before the war and returned to geology as a profession after the war. those would be good books to have even in the pre-war versions and if they can get a Radio Amateur Handbook then they will have some good references. I do suspect that the league might have people like this but it will be up to Taylor to decide what they got. Gonna take a large table and a lot of dice to get a real possibility on anything coming through.

          18. By Lou Schirmer on

            It wasn’t GPS accurate & didn’t rely on satellites, but LORAN was introduced in WW2 & did quite well in it’s various iterations until the satellite navigation systems came along & was considerably cheaper.

          19. By William Curry on

            For security reasons (as GPS can be jammed or spoofed easily) they are going back to a version of LORAN called eLORAN and the US Navy is making their officers learn celestial navigation again. I suspect that radiomen and signalers will have to learn Morse again.

          20. By William Curry on

            The US also had some advantages in WW2, as almost everybody that went into the military already knew how to drive a motor vehicle and in most units your could find people who knew at least basic mechanics or electrical work from work on there own stuff. Even the British or German armed forces lacked this advantage.

          21. By Lou Schirmer on

            Are the LOT personnel primarily conscripts, or a mix of professional “lifers” with conscripts & volunteers in the lower ranks? We could find out from the prisoners. A truly equal conscription program would bring in many professionally trained, experienced engineers & skilled labor along with teachers & others with a wide variety of knowledge. Add that to the technical training & experience of the “lifers” & you get a very broad knowledge base, especially considering the size of the LOT fleet.

          22. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

            Prepare for a rambling, Courtney-esque, stream of consciousness post:

            True Matthieu, but I didn’t take things that far from a tech perspective for a reason. Those things simply won’t be available to our guys for generations, if ever. But “Tech Teams” are still important, as I will touch on in a minute.

            And good point about the civilian contractors. (In US service, don’t forget–after Wake Island–many engineer contractors were given extra training, handed a rifle, and incorporated into the SeeBees). And there were UK contractors on KGV when she fought Bismarck. Coastwatchers? Many, many examples of civilians happily snatched up in times of need. And it’s possible that a CES force would include engineers as well, to stabilize or make initial repairs to Suez Canal–and other–infrastructures that might be damaged during military operations. (Not saying it DID, just posing the possibility.

            As for “teams of specialists” required to make technical things, however, this is not a new phenomenon. Particularly when applying their expertise to mass production. Just an off the cuff example:
            During the peak of the fur trade, there were @ seventy different manufacturers of “trade guns” in the Birmingham area alone. The usual way of building lots of complicated things prior to the industrial revolution involved the use of apprentices, craftsmen, and masters. The master knew how to do everything but the others focused on various aspects of the overall production. In gunbuilding for example, you had lock filers, stock shapers, barrel makers, etc., (each discipline often having their own “masters” and apprenctices). Then of course you had to have people who were skilled at final assembly and tuning. ALL often left their marks somewhere on the finished product, “signing their work” as it were.
            In many countries, these endeavors were dominated by guilds, but not so much in the US, Canada, and other “frontiers” where virtually every town had its own gunmaker skilled at all aspects of building a rifle or fusil from scratch. (These men were often Europeans–and Russians, Alexey!–who emigrated precisely so they could escape the guild system and set up on their own). Perhaps this was even the root of the “Yankee Ingenuity” (used as a collective term here, regardless of location), which I referenced earlier. Better makers would gain reputations and get business from farther afield while lesser makers either couldn’t compete and went out of business or went to work for the better makers–helping THEM prosper by acquiring skilled workers.
            I think I mentioned this before, but the 1817 “Common” Rifle was let out to multiple contractors but it was the 1st US military rifle that required perfect interchangeability of (hand-fitted) parts from ALL contractors or the contractor didn’t get paid! Whether it was the 1817 itself or the general attitude it represented, this philosophy helped kickstart increasing “templatization” (I just made that word up) and even mechanization of the manufacturing process, and it further encouraged the burgeoning notion of “assembly lines” that I think I have shown that Henry Ford did NOT invent! :)
            Anyway, think of the “what is possible” collective knowledge of the D-men, Republic, League, and Empire as the overall “master” in the manufacturing process while individuals within those groups are the “masters” of the various disciplines, teaching and using apprentices to make what they know how to make–or pushing them to come up with ways to make what they are more familiar with than others. Add to this mix an understanding of the necessity for interchangeability, quality control, and the “Henry Ford Model” for lack of a better example, (he did refine it), assembly line process.
            Built into this process is a rapid evolution from the old to the new way of doing things, and in the Allies’ case at least, a strong appreciation for individual ingenuity and initiative.

            And Don, though they haven’t been featured in recent installments, don’t forget the work of Casey (KIA), Palmer and Riggs. They did manage to make and begin miniaturizing quite a bit of comm equipment, but having begun that process, other “masters” have emerged. That’s why there is increasing capability even while the original “masters” have been free to do other things. SHOULD they be? That’s another question.

          23. By William Curry on

            Don’t forget that Germany had thr OT (Organization Todt which were construction people, orginally civilians that were later incorporated into the Wehrmacht. And they had the TENO (technical emergency services) which kept the infrastructure running in the face of Allied bombing raids.

          24. By Matthieu on

            ” don’t forget–after Wake Island–many engineer contractors were given extra training”

            I read a lot about Wake and even wrote some articles on this fascinating story. Civilian contractors not allowed to help marines to dig… That was so strange (from my point of view).

            “Many, many examples of civilians happily snatched up in times of need. And it’s possible that a CES force would include engineers as well, to stabilize or make initial repairs to Suez Canal–and other–infrastructures that might be damaged during military operations. (Not saying it DID, just posing the possibility.”

            Sure. It’s just that in European armies you’ll not have “civilian contractors” as, by definition, after mobilization, everybody is in the army (even if you’re old. You then belong to some special units). Those who remain in plants are most of the time highly qualified tech called “affectés spéciaux” (special occupation) who technically belong to the army (meaning that they get army pay and will be sent to the frontline if they fail). They will wear uniforms. You can expect to see many on the ships but don’t expect to see any “civilian” as it’s the US way, not the European way. In the UK it was also quite different as those civilians were arsenal workers and had a semi military status.

            “In many countries, these endeavors were dominated by guilds”

            You’re completely right… until a given point. Depending on the country this system failed sooner or later under the pressure of workers and capitalists.

            ” I have shown that Henry Ford did NOT invent! :)”

            Sure. Some earlier examples are the Gribauval system and may other artillery systems.

            “Add to this mix an understanding of the necessity for interchangeability, quality control, and the “Henry Ford Model” for lack of a better example, (he did refine it), assembly line process.”

            I do believe in this logic. What they are going to lack, most of the time, is the reference book. What’s a reference book? In our world engineers spent years to create reference values. After you only have to refer to this book to know what to do.

            Example: when you produce steel, there is a link between temperature, percentage of sulfur, molybdene, carbon, austenite and martensite phase. All engineers know that. The problem is that there is a huge gap between what you know and what you need. They need things like that:

            https://nayhan.files.wordpress.com/2008/06/phase_diag_iron_carbon1.png

            To create such a plot you need hundreds of experiments and years of work. Fortunately, they already know what to look for. For me it’s going to slow them a lot.

            Another example: once you move to advanced products, you need chemistry. Some of you must have studied it and you all know that it’s a complete nightmare. It’s easy to know what you have to mix with what. what’s complicated is to know what you need to do so: the right temperature, the right catalizer and, more important, how to deal with impurities.

          25. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

            //in European armies you’ll not have “civilian contractors” as, by definition, after mobilization, everybody is in the army//

            Yep, Matthieu, I bet the US system does seem strange. You have to look at the historical reasons, however. Separation of military and civilian was part of US founding principles after some bad experiences . . . Generally works fairly well, though the lines get blurred at times, particularly in times of total war. Still lots of “civilian auxiliaries.” The CAP (Civil Air Patrol) is still going strong (my 84 year old dad still flies for them and holds a reserve commission as a colonel). They do search and rescue and surveillance after natural disasters, primarily, but still train with the Air Force from time to time to keep the ability to coordinate operations. And the CAP got a few Nazi subs during the war.

          26. By Matthieu on

            “Yep, Matthieu, I bet the US system does seem strange”

            Well. Not really save for some things. In 1776 the Continental army was exactly like European ones. The milicia was quite different (in Prussia they would never have given weapons to peasants!).

            Until 1860, when most European powers switched to general mobilization, US and European armies worked the same way: mainly professionals. Then appeared second rate units (calles milicias or garde nationale or reserve divisions). Then in 1880 most European powers switched to full mobilization. They remained there until the 90′. In the USA it didn’t exist (and the US selection system was incredibly light compared to what happened in most countries).

            What’s really surprising for me is the current use of “civilian contractors” in the USA to replace some police or military forces.

            Here it’s a big no-no as the State (notice tha capital letter) has regalian rights. It’shard to translate but it means that only the State (meaning the People and the Country) are allowed to
            – manage the diplomacy
            – ensure safety in the country (police right)
            – judge (judicial right)
            – emit money and vote a budget
            – raise an army

            Personnal armies, by extension, any contracted civilians (or companies) with weapon are, per definition, forbidden. Most people here just don’t even imagine that it can exist. The most direct consequences are
            – no bounty hunters (well, it’s also impossible as the whole idea of “bail” does not exist either. Here there are three possibilities: you do to jail (if we think that you can escape), you are released (if we think that you’ll not going to escape), you can ask to be released with a bail. It’s possible ONLY with financial femonies and the basic rule is “you give us rights on everything: house, car, savings, no loan allowed”).
            – no “civilian contractors” to help the police (for example something like the “Disney Police” is completely impossible to imagine).
            – nobody with a weapon in Irak, Mali and so on. The army carries weapons. Civilian contractors are here to provide technical help when needed. Nothing more. Never.

      2. By Justin on

        Oversaturation of plankton causing a much more crowded ocean? Eh, sounds fair enough.

        Still, the lynchpin of any ocean food chain is small fish in large schools, like herring and sardines. And between the sharks, the squid, mountain fish, pliosaurs, plesiosaurs and piranha-tuna (and who know what else), it seems like a minor evolutionary miracle that said schools haven’t died off and brought the whole ecosystem down with them.
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DHeZrLnY3Dk

        Reply
        1. By donald j johnson on

          It is interesting that someone brings up the micro Fauna of the ocean. The small fish that was mentioned are actually not the linchpin but the microphone is the food of everything as this is a minor Ice Age the cool undersea currents from the Arctic and Antarctic are bringing lots of food to the micro fauna which in turn become the food for the small fish squids Etc. They’re going to have a lot of fun exploring the oceans after the war is over to find out exactly what is in them and where it is coming from

          Reply
          1. By Steve Moore on

            Yes, the end of the war may bring that staple of the ’50’s lunch pail… canned sardines. No more Vienna sausages, although my dogs have always loved both.

          2. By donald johnson on

            never ate a sardine in my life and have no plans to do so. small fish just have too many bones. mo something that you can carve a steak from is different and the best sea steak i ever ate was cut from a 44 lb squid (that is 20 Kilos for you Europeans :-).

  4. By Lou Schirmer on

    Here’s a thought to ponder.
    Most of the transfers involve 1-3 ships or planes in isolated circumstances, except the LOT.
    That apparently involved an entire invasion fleet, probably a couple of battleship divisions with assorted heavy & light cruisers & destroyer squadrons as escorts, plus the transports, supply & replenishment ships & either Macchischmitts flying cover or boxed up for transport & larger aircraft (Ju-52 etc.) flying along.
    1. This can’t be explained away by local authorities as a storm or enemy action, too many ships involved. There may even have been witnesses on distant ships or planes saying WTF?
    2. After all the isolated, smaller incidents, why this huge one?
    3. This would change the entire balance of power for the CES in their world. The French & Italians suddenly lost a significant (maybe 50% or more) of their entire navies, and probably a lot of support material, transports & squadrons of aircraft & a number of troops. The Spanish suddenly loose some ships, planes & an entire army. The Germans didn’t loose as much. Maybe they aren’t junior partners anymore. If the CES are at war with the British, they are suddenly at a complete disadvantage. Things must be interesting in their old world.

    Reply
    1. By Steve Moore on

      Squall may have hit while they were in harbor, scooping up the fleet at one crack. They wouldn’t have put to sea with heavy weather threatening, so maybe they were sitting ducks.

      You’re right, Lou. A huge transfer like that would probably have snatched up a greater proportion of French and Italian naval units, since German naval surface units would have had to get by Gibraltar, and Spanish naval units would probably have been tasked to work with Spanish coastal artillery to keep the Strait open. Not to mention that it would have soaked up at least a few Italian MAS boats as well as special ops forces.

      Reply
      1. By Lou Schirmer on

        That would do it, but there’s a problem with that also. With the sea level drop, most of the ships would be hard aground & the ones that weren’t would be trapped in a harbor they couldn’t get out of anymore.

        Reply
          1. By donald j johnson on

            They may have been hard aground but then maybe all they had to do was wait for high tide

          2. By Lou Schirmer on

            True. However I’ve been reconsidering the transfer at sea scenario. The squall wouldn’t need to cover the entire invasion fleet at once, which would be huge. It only has to be a squall line 25-30 miles wide & the fleet would sail into it. A fleet that big would have a rough time doing that big of a sudden course change to avoid it & a squall is only a brief storm with no large danger potential for most ships.

          3. By donald johnson on

            my feeling is that the fleet must have been at anchor in a harbor somewhere to have that many ships transferred. i just cannot envision an area much larger than a mile or two across because if it were then we would have seen the affects of many more missing ships in the past

          4. By Steve Moore on

            Most transfers occur at sea, so it could be assumed that squalls are ‘recharged’ by natural forces, for which the southeast Asia seas are well known. Ditto for the NUS transfer in the Gulf of Mexico. However, we have had land transfers, so that theory may not hold completely.

            Is there enough potential in the Med’s waters to drive such a huge storm? Gentlemen?

          5. By Charles Simpson on

            Most transfers are at sea Victor Gravois in Straits of Hell mentions the League Fleet’s transfer much like what Amagi went through. Note how wide spread the squall was that took Walker and Mahan, it also took the PBY, S-19, and Amagi. Thus I se no problem with the Fleet being transferred, it is possible the League does not even know land transfers are possible.

            Taylor posted on the old Website that a whole city in the valley of Mexico was transferred. The other land transfer we know about were the Czechs.

          6. By Alexey Shiro on

            I wonder…

            Exactly why the League of TRIPOLI? Why they stayed in Africa, instead of some other region of Mediterranean?

            What if…

            What if the CES fleet was snatched & transferred with some chunk of actual Tripolitania? Maybe the city of Tripoli itself? In that case, they may already have civilian population, some industry, ect…

          7. By Lou Schirmer on

            The invasion fleet may have staged out of Tripoli, after all the Italians controlled it in our world in the 1930s, I don’t see why they wouldn’t in the CESs world. The entire fleet could not all fit in Tripoli harbor as it’s too small, but maybe the flag ships of the CES nations & leaders got together to finalize the operation plans. They may have been putting to sea when the squall hit & as Alexey theorizes, took the city & harbor as well as the fleet.

          8. By Charles Simpson on

            Not to mention dames to help with the Dame famine 😉

          9. By donald j johnson on

            In re-reading the above comments I suddenly realized that all of us overlooked one thing. Although the amigi and the Walker Etc were transferred, they all came down in slightly different areas so if a large fleet was picked up in a small Harbor what percentage of the fleet ended up on land instead of in the water due to the scattering effect this is something that Taylor will have to explain

          10. By Steve Moore on

            think Taylor would have put in a mass grounding. My guess is that it picked up the core of the force; outlying pickets might have been able to move away from it but main force would have stayed in formation. JMHO

          11. By Lou Schirmer on

            The Amagi, Walker & Mahan were all fairly close together (Mahan & Walker especially) when they transferred, & they all came down at least several hundred miles from each other. As you guys say, many of the CES fleet may have been not just aground, but tens of miles inland, & others scattered across the central Mediterranean Sea. Some of those, if stupid or arrogant enough, may have encountered & antagonized a preexisting Med civilization. That may be what is currently holding the LOT’s attention.

          12. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

            Everybody here is potentially right here, but I’ll never blow. The only thing I’m going to comment on is Lou’s post, however. It was never established that Walker and Mahan came out several hundred miles from Amagi. It could, in fact, have been the same place–only by the time Amagi emerged from the squall, Walker and Mahan were gone. Don’t forget that the DDs and the BC were running on opposite tracks and the BC was running WITH the squall. It crawled up her skirt and she was in it longer . . .

          13. By donald johnson on

            I think that what Taylor is inferring here is that the time of arrival (Ie. transit time) varried so we may have to assume that the more massive the object being transferred the longer or shorter the transit time. Hmmmmmmmmm. . . . .

          14. By Justin on

            Nice thinking Steve, Lou – now I got a good one.

            As dreaded, there’s a late Thirties BC or fast BB stashed away up north, BUT she got dumped out in the middle of the North African desert. The League’s been using POWs and slaves to dig her out for the past six years.
            So now she’s almost ready to rejoin the fleet. Unless, of course the Union can put together a jailbreak (or slave revolt), capture her and sail her out of the Med to join the Alliance! Paging Gunny Silva…

          15. By donald j johnson on

            So for 6 years this Battleship has been in the desert and they’ve been digging the canal to reach it how much and how big of a canal for one Battleship that seems like a lost cause. Or at least a waste of resources that could have been better used for other purposes after all to dig a canal wide enough and deep enough to float the battleship and the number of miles to the beach seems a bit much to expect even the league to attempt it is going to be needing to be at least 150 ft wide and at least 40 ft deep and once they got it done they’re going to have to fill it with water which means a lot of pumping and probably going to need a few water gates for leveled changes in a canal assuming the possibility of several hundred feet level change

  5. By Alexey Shiro on

    Just a thought… Was the Destroyermen setting influenced a bit by 1970s “Land of the Lost” TV series? The world where things from other worlds are delivered by some interdimensional process, dinosaurs, carnivorous sentient reptiles (with crossbows) and cute furry humanoids…

    Reply
    1. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

      Nope. Although my brother liked it (he was obsessed by Speed Racer, if you can believe it), I can honestly say I never saw an entire episode. Even then, after the release of the Iconic (to me) Valley of Gwangi (best dinosaurs EVER until Jurassic Park) I was appalled by the bad costumes, cheesy special effects, bad acting, etc. So…no, I can say with certainty that D-men was NOT influenced by that…thing…in any way. In fact, if I’d watched it enough to be aware of any possible similarities in concept, I’d have deliberately avoided them like the plague.

      Reply
      1. By Alexey Shiro on

        Hm. Understood. So, just the parallel evolution, if we use scientific therms)

        Actually, pretty interesting point to think about a bit – non-influenced parallel lines in the independent fictional settings. Are they just accidental, or they brought in by some parallel logic patterns?

        Quite interesting – unfortunately, it is clearly out of my area of competence…

        Reply
      2. By Alexey Shiro on

        //he was obsessed by Speed Racer, if you can believe it),//

        Can I? Easily; it was one of the first anime series, shown in Russia in 1990s, and (like Macron-1 and Viltron) they became pretty iconic for my generation! :) Until the Pokemon showed up (grumble, grumble… kids those days…)

        Reply
        1. By donald johnson on

          I never watch pokemon , never even heard of speed racer, I read a book called land of the lost but it was in south america. I am as you can guess a BOOK reader not a TV/Movie watcher. Recently got on netflix and found that they have ALL the startrek stuff in hi def color which is nice so now i can see it as it was supposed to be and not on 10″ black and white.
          What is Macron-1 and Viltron?

          Reply
          1. By Alexey Shiro on

            As well as “Speed Racer”, they were americanized versions of some Japanese anime, made in 1980s. They usually have more or less restructurized plot, new audio, americanized setting – an attemp to made Japanese anime morre “suitable” for Western viewers. Those series were among the first anime series ever shown in Russia.

        2. By William Curry on

          If you like anime, check out Girls und Panzer. The art work is terrific.

          Reply
          1. By Lou Schirmer on

            I like the pink M-3, excellent camouflage..

        1. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

          Yes I did see that one. Had Doug McClure in it. The dinos were dopey but the submarine sets etc. were pretty good.

          Reply
          1. By steve moore on

            Back when I was a kid, DC comics had an irregular series on WW2 characters getting lost in the South Pacific and ending up in a similar world… it was usually a choice between that, Sgt Rock and the Haunted Tank. Or a oz Coke in a REAL bottle.

  6. By donald johnson on

    In all the discussions about mountain fish has anyone thought about a much safer and more reasonable form of nerve transmission. As on our world there are many forms of light generating fish and all fish have eye’s why not have optical transmission of nerve energy. after all all you would need is a hollow tube containing water or other material as an optical fiber. This would alleviate the speed of nerve transmission unless to many repeaters are required to go from one end of the fish to the brain.
    This seems to me anyway as more likely than the superconductors that some think are required and actually less dangerous to the fish. Yes a fish the size of a mountain will most likely need sub processors at extreme ends of the fish for local processing and I can see problems in this but I do not see a great likelihood of the sub-processors being intelligent on their own though depending on how large they were they may be able to do so and this alone could make the activity’s of the fish erratic and unpredictable (tail saying why swim not hungry when main brain says swim cause I see food.)

    Reply
  7. By Justin on

    http://www.newsweek.com/orcas-killing-great-white-sharks-eating-livers-607002

    I wonder if there’s any whale analogues (Basilosaurus, gri-kakka subspecies, kraken-sized cephalopods, etc) that hunt mountain fish?

    Carnivores in the wild have been known to use humans in their daily lives – lions chase giraffes into traffic, dolphins cooperate with fishermen (octopi just steal from them), Moscow’s stray dogs ride the subway.
    It’s not hard to imagine groups of “hunters” tagging along behind a Union DD, hoping that the AMFDIC and depth charges will stun their prey and give them an easy meal. Depending on how smart they are, it might even turn into a partnership.

    Reply
    1. By Steve Moore on

      Hmmmm. Something willing to take on a mountain fish. Sounds like sonar needs to be 360 degree scope. Those babies would be something to stay away from…

      Reply
    2. By Alexey Shiro on

      With all respect, but Mountain Fish itself is a headache for any biologist. As I mentioned before, they clearly are originated in some pretty different world, and have less common with any know animals than bacteria. I really doubt that there are any creature that might hunt adult ones -except each other.

      Reply
      1. By Justin on

        Well, the only really dangerous part of a mountain fish is the mouth, and I imagine that even the juvenile ones are pretty cumbersome.

        As stated in the link above, orcas like to tip over sharks just to eat the liver. An very intelligent species of sea monster may remain out of MF gulping range and go for the fins; either get your meal that way, or wait for the prick to die and then eat the whole thing.

        Might not work on the big ones, but lone juvenile MFs and gri-kakka would be ripe targets for a pack species.

        Reply
        1. By Alexey Shiro on

          Go to the fins of something, that probably have hot superconductors in all-electric nerve system? No, I don’t think so. The unfortunate Orka would be hit before she could even finish the bite.

          Reply
          1. By Justin on

            I mean the radiator fins – at least some have to be nerveless appendages. The hypothetical hunters will have been around for enough millennia to figure out which fins are safe.

            Get a whole bunch of whale/mosasaur/squid friends to bait while others bite off a fin or two, wait a few hours for the fish to overheat, wait another few hours for the electric charge to dissipate, boom – dinner for a whole month!

            At worst, they could mob gri-kakka or some other large animal. It’s a big ocean.

          2. By Alexey Shiro on

            The radiator fins are probably filled with nerves – exactly because they are vunerable. Small-scale damage would be no more than annoying, but if gri-kakka would try to be anything more than a nuisance… The mountain fish would quickly demonstrate, that it was Stupid Thing To Do.

            At least according to books, the M’fishes have pretty good reaction. So, if the herd of gri-kakkas would try to assault one… the gri-kakkas would be quite healthy snack for the m’fish)

          3. By donald johnson on

            I find the idea of bionic super conductors a bit scary. They would need to have sheathing that was a perfect nonconductor so that they would not kill themselves. the brains of the mountain fish would need to be distributed throughout the fish without a much faster nerve transmission speed than we know of I do agree with but I just can not see a superconductor unless the creature is artificial in origin. Distributed brains are known in our world, just look at the very large dinosaurs.

          4. By Alexey Shiro on

            Unfortunately, I couldn’t imagine any other way to move the 300 meters long monster, with a hundred thousand ton-body, at the speed of 15 knots. They need nerves with MUCH more conductivity that Earth-like organic could provide – otherwise, the nerves would overheat.

            And, organic superconductors are real things. Granted, the best that they (currently) could manage is 33 kelvins (-240 C, or -400 F) but in pure theory there may be an exotic organic compound that could work as high-tem superconductor.

  8. By Justin on

    http://www.newsweek.com/orcas-killing-great-white-sharks-eating-livers-607002
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Killer_whales_of_Eden,_Australia

    I wonder if there’s any whale analogues (Basilosaurus, gri-kakka subspecies, kraken-sized cephalopods, etc) that hunt mountain fish?

    Carnivores in the wild have been known to use humans in their daily lives – lions chase giraffes into traffic, dolphins cooperate with fishermen (octopi just steal from them), Moscow’s stray dogs ride the subway.
    It’s not hard to imagine groups of “hunters” tagging along behind a Union DD, hoping that the AMFDIC and depth charges will stun their prey and give them an easy meal. Depending on how smart they are, it might even turn into a partnership.

    Reply
  9. Taylor AndersonBy Taylor Anderson (Post author) on

    “DEVIL’S DUE” is officially on the loose!

    I’m very excited and hope you all enjoy reading it as much as I loved writing it! I’ll be getting a few copies to give away–signed, of course. Hey! How about a “Favorite Scene in the Series” contest? (Pre Devil’s Due, to avoid spoilers). Describe your choice here or on my facebook page by, say, July 4th, and three winners will be determined by how many comments agree with you!

    Reply
  10. By Justin on

    Is it possible that actual avian birds might have been able to evolve on this Earth? Or failing that, cross over and establish a viable population?

    Reply
    1. By donald johnson on

      Yes there is no reason that an earth type bird could not transfer but depending on how hungry and aggressive the area it transferred to is, it may not survive long enough to find a compatible mate to breed.

      Reply
  11. By Logan Meyers on

    I was just thinking about how Courtney would go mad for a bathysphere to study the depths of the wild waters they live in, after all as a naturalist he would have known of the first success using one. Though I would guess the first few tries he may send someone else down…just because…wanting to share the limelight I’m sure. But it would be an amazing leap in oceanography on this world to even get sketches of the deep sea creatures here.

    Reply
    1. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

      No kidding. Just based on what they’ve fished out, there are probably some really scary boogers down there. Shoot, there are really scary booger in OUR seas! Courtney would probably have to be stopped from going first. He’s certainly not a coward, and after the action on the West Mangoro River, I think you’ll find he’s had some changes in perspective…

      Reply
      1. By donald johnson on

        I can see him being dragged out of it so as to make sure that He is not eaten by the local mountain fish. The sphere is just bite size!

        Reply
        1. By Justin on

          Exactly what I was thinking. Heck, even the gri-kakka could make a mess of a ‘sphere.

          Probably best to wait until the ROV is invented. You might not be able to observe things as well as a manned submersible, but you don’t lose all your data – or life – if something eats the robot.

          Reply
          1. By Logan Meyers on

            But that is a long ways off and until that point the question of life in the depths will be one of the greatest mysteries. After all at the time of the first bathysphere people didn’t believe the claims about the life down there, Courtney would be tempted to replicate himself to see if the mass of discoveries was true. Also at this point it was believed the bottom of the ocean was a desolate lifeless place and Courtney could prove that there are creatures that live that deep rewriting previously known oceanography. But it is true that its a great risk combining pressure as well as the sea life down there. But say they set off depth charges near the surface, that would drive away some of the more shallow predators allowing him safe passage to the depths which wouldn’t have been affected as strongly.

          2. By donald johnson on

            the problem with fishing with hand grenades is that all the dead meat attracts the predator’s you thought you were killing with the first one and you end up with more than you had once the blood starts to spread out!

    2. By Justin on

      Honestly, I’m more concerned about the open sea. Deep sea creatures tend to stick to the deep sea… and we’ve yet to see any Dunkleosteus, basilosaurs, spinosaurs or Greyhound-sized crocs.

      Reply
  12. By Julian Ceres on

    Year: 1922
    Location: Caribbean Sea
    Weather condition: God Awful

    U.S.S Silverweed powered through the massive waves as captain Reed guided the small scout cruiser through the storm. Wave after wave had threatened to swamp the already damaged ship and the captain had given up hope.

    Suddenly, a massive wave engulfed the ship as everything went black.

    The rays of sun got to reeds eyes as he blocked out the sun. The storm, had stopped. However though, a new question emerged. “where the hell are we?” Shrugging the thought off as minor, Reed slammed the throttle to the maximum and his ship, smoke bellowing from the stacks, plowed fiercely through the calm ocean water. Then the spotter picked up a moving vehicle on a bayside road about 10,000 meters away. without thinking Captain Reed let the horn of the old Chester class scout cruiser loose. “The sound of the horn must have traveled to the position of the vehicle” Reed thought as his battered and beaten ship made it’s way to a nearby harbor…

    Reply
    1. By Alexey Shiro on

      First of all: no US cruiser could be named USS “Silverweed”. The naming convention since 1907 clearly states that any cruiser-type vessel (not counting battlecruisers) must be named for US cities and towns.

      Second: there is no throttle on steamship that captain could slam to the maximum. This isn’t a car, you know! The captain ordered to increase speed, the orders are realyed to snipes, and they ajust the pressure, machine power, ect.

      Third: how could the US light cruiser in 1922 be already damaged in Carribean Sea? With whom the USN fight in this timeline? Britain invaded Cuba?

      Reply
        1. By Alexey Shiro on

          But how could it be heavy damaged in that region?

          You mentioned:

          // the already damaged ship //

          I agree that “Chester”‘s were actually the best ships even when they were designed – but to seriously damage even such ship you need some enemy efforts. So: with whom the USN fought in 1922 of your world?

          Reply
        2. By Lou Schirmer on

          Presumably they’re in a hurricane, which could provide plenty of damage, & then this last wave (maybe a rogue wave) almost finishes her. The Chester’s weren’t much different, size wise than a WW2 DD & very poorly armed.
          The “throttle” could be the engine telegraph.
          Is there a town named in the US named “Sileverweed”?

          Reply
    2. By Denis Van Wassenhoven on

      Hi to all,

      I might be posting in the wrong place. I’m a newbie from Ontario Canada and I enjoyed immensely all the novels published so far (I can’t wait for the new one slated for this June).

      Through some researches on pre-dreadnoughts battleships, I came upon a truly ugly ships which immediately brought Griks, Dons, and the League to mind (it probably would fit better with the latter however it would fit esthetically both former (let’s suppose it a gift from the League) . This pre-dreadnought ugly (compliments of the French Navy) was scrapped and it never fired a gun at an opponent. Here’s a picture:

      https://www.bing.com/images/search?view=detailV2&q=french+battleship+carnot&selectedIndex=0&stid=8561814e-1aa3-8700-0aa5-9f8d5bdd0c48&cbn=EntityAnswer&ajaxhist=0

      It’s simply a suggestion.

      Cheers!

      Reply
  13. By donald johnson on

    Pade 295 storm surge hard back book

    Fred adjusted the cartridge box and sward belt.

    Fred had just retrieved cloths and weapons from some Dom cavalry when the above line was written. I was unaware that the doms used cartridges in their pistols and muskets. Did i mis something or is the box that carries the slugs called a cartridge box.

    Reply
    1. By Charles Simpson on

      Paper cartridges with measured powder charge and bullet were used with muskets replacing earlier per-measured charges in wooden bottles on a cross belt called the twelve apostles. The cartridge box had a wooden part drilled to hold the paper cartridges upright gor easy grasping. The soldier bit off the end, primed the pan, then poured the charge down the bore then seated the ball and used the paper as a wading to keep the charge in place.

      Reply
  14. By donald johnson on

    re costly and wasteful. Only a providentual aspect of their nature protects us from the greatfish in our Pacific sea, they are not as . . . . temperate in the seas to the east.

    Hmmm does this appear to say that the fish in waters of the Atlantic are worse than the pacific or just the western pacific that the Doms know
    What dangers are waiting there for us to find?

    Reply
    1. By donald johnson on

      part of my remarks on the previous were left off somehow. this has happened before and have been wondering why.

      from page 200 of the hard copy of storm surge

      true, but such trips are costly and wasteful.

      Reply
  15. By Charles Simpson on

    Alternate worlds with alternate histories give infinite possibilities. One area Taylor has not explored is a transfer from a world where the Grik like beings, Gentaa, or Lemurains had an advanced civilization.

    Perhaps a passenger ship of peaceful Lemurian tourists suddenly finds itself in the Destroyermen’s world. One group of these tourists are aircraft designers, another group ship designers, and another group are metallurgists and they speak the remarkably changeless Lemurian base language. So here is your chance what other types of transfers of non humans might occur?

    Reply
    1. By Justin on

      If a Grik War II cruiser decides to pop in and help the Union against the “primitive ignorant savages,” by all means.

      Needs a few more female dinos though. Seeing as nature and the fossil record seem to point to either a co-ed pack structure or a matriarchy, the current sausage fest in the raptor factions is a bit puzzling.

      Reply
      1. By donald johnson on

        This does bring up a point that I have been thinking about. If the Grik are a matriarch then why are the grik generals male, and why are the choosers male. We know that they do have other females an were they truly a matriarchy one would think that more of the high offices would be female.

        Reply
        1. By Charles Simpson on

          there are high females of the Royal house, and brood mares of the common hij. Remember Rag was mated.

          Reply
          1. By Justin on

            But those are consorts, often literal baby makers. No female nobles, generals or even warriors like the Lemurians.

            You could argue that other noble females are threats to the CM’s power (like with bees) but that’s not entirely the case. And that brings up another question – how did the Grik go from a pack society to a male-dominated insect hive?

  16. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

    Okay guys, the time has come, once again, when some of you earn (one of the reasons) I put you in my acknowledgements! Having finished going over the CEM, I will no doubt soon receive the page proofs for the paperback “Blood In The Water.” This is the last chance to “fix” typos and screw-ups, even inconsistencies in the tech section. I rely on you guys to catch things I miss–and any such are very appreciated! Please post anything you find at the top of the technical discussions page!

    Reply
  17. By Logan Meyers on

    Okay so I have done some thinking on some of the possibilities of life in the ocean. With the massive amount of volcanic activity in this world there must be a great number of vents on the ocean floor. With this chemosynthetic ecosystems that survive off of bacteria that process the chemicals from the vents. With these bacteria fueling all kinds of life the creatures that live in the depths could be massive like much of the life towards the surface. If one was to descend in a bathysphere the sights would be like nothing we can imagine. I’m sure Courtney would lose his mind if he was in such a world of discovery.

    Reply
    1. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

      Very true. There’s weird enough stuff down there in “this” world!

      Reply
      1. By Logan Meyers on

        You know I am reminded of how greatly sea life played a part in the naval battles of our world. During the naval battle between the navies of Anthony and Octavian that decided much of world history it was actually fish that had a huge part in the outcome. During the conflict a school of sucker fish had attached themselves to one of the command ships of Anthony’s navy causing it to be unable to properly maneuver with its understrength contingent of rowers (the Egyptian forces had had a huge outbreak that gutted the men needed for the oars). The erratic movement and falling behind put the nearby ships into disarray and in the confusion they were easily picked off.

        But this is a tale from my old Ripley’s Believe It Or Not big book from the 70’s. Hey but I choose to believe it even if it happened in this world or an alternate one.

        Reply
    1. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

      Damn it, I never say never, I’ve seen too many amazing things in nature to do that, and I’d LOVE it if it was real, but I’m skeptical. A) I’m definitely a youtube cynic, but mainly B) I don’t like the way it’s flying.
      There are bats almost as big as it appeared (though size is crazy difficult to judge) and I suspect they would use much the same mechanics of flight. I’ve studied them closely, and your local pterodactyl ain’t doing it right. Ok, maybe pterodactyls don’t fly exactly like bats, but basically, it seems to be flapping either too much or too little, and there’s no apparent propelling force with all the flapping. My guess? A really clever flying model that can flap its wings without dramatically altering the lift characteristics. (That might explain why it did a flip when it moved its head dramatically. Over control? I’m thinking the head constitutes most if not all control surfaces. Good recovery by the pilot, though). Electric motors could be in the feet, (that don’t move)and propellers would be hardly visible if at all. And there’s no sound, so it could even use one of the cool new miniature jets, for that matter. Mainly, and this makes me most skeptical of all–as with all youtube revelations . . . why put it on youtube, except for attention? if it IS real, you immediately lose credibility (in my opinion). Is there more info on this? Local news coverage? Maybe a video with sound? See? I’d LIKE to be convinced!

      I am not a pessimist; I’m an optimist with experience.

      Reply
      1. By Justin on

        Yup, it’s probably a glider.

        See how stiffly (and almost precisely timed) its wings flap? It looks programmed – not at all natural like a bird or a bat, or even a CGI pterosaur.

        Reply
  18. By donald johnson on

    The pass of Fire is probably the results a large Hydrogen Bomb Blast or other Planet Killer that some previous civilization left behind when they destroyed themselves

    Reply
    1. By Alexey Shiro on

      Well, it is possible. But it oculd also be just civilian engineering project of past civilization – i.e. the Panama Channel without locks. Probably a dozen or so deep-placed megaton-scale hydrogen charges could do the trick.

      But I must agree, there is something suspicious about this particular spot on the map… the all other geography seems to be absolutely the same, safe for sea level. Such hole between continents definitedly could not be “just different erosion”.

      Reply
      1. By William Curry on

        There was a study to cut a new trans-isthmus canal using nuclear devices. This I believe was in the 1950’s or early 60’s and the new canal would have been in Nicaragua. The project was not funded.

        Reply
    2. By Charles Simpson on

      The hints are the Chixalub [? sp] asteroid did a land rather than sea strike.

      Reply
      1. By Justin on

        Chicxulub (Chee-shuh-loob). And she was large enough to cause a global extinction; a land strike wouldn’t be any less catastrophic than the Toba eruption.

        The only way this Earth could exist is if the asteroid missed entirely. Or was butterflied into a more manageable size – a Barringer Crater-sized impact might be enough to create a Pass of Fire.

        Reply
      2. By Steve White on

        That’s what I recall. Shift the down-orbit a degree or two and you whack Panama instead of the Yucatan.

        Reply
    3. By Ryan Marra on

      I am betting more along the lines of Super volcanic eruption, which means a volcano like Yellowstone Super Volcano. Considering that when these things erupt they can destroy mountains with ease, forming a pass like that shouldn’t be to hard. However that would be one heck of an eruption.

      Reply
  19. By Joe Thorsky on

    Steve-Guys

    Expanding the discussion and the perspective further again;
    let us hypothesize that the planet itself has become/is the nutrient culture that nurtures and feeds the Mountain Fish
    now we can identify the process as one of “Ozziemosis vitiosus”

    Reply
  20. By Steve White on

    In the July, 1956 issue of Scientific American-Clan magazine there is a discussion of the flasher-fish (Consolea vitiosus) habitats. It’s known that the species ranges from Indian Ocean to the mid-Pacific, but are not found in the Atlantic ocean. The authors speculate that the cold-water barriers off the tips of South America and South Africa are part of the reason, and that a cold-water current that runs north on the west coast of South America accounts for some of the barrier there. The Indian Ocean, particularly around the African coast and Malay barrier, also contain many of the small fish that C. vitiosus prefers as food; these are progressively lacking as one goes further east. Finally, the authors speculate on certain river fish in South America within the Dominion that are said to resemble C. vitiosus in behavior, and hope that one day an expedition might be mounted to examine them.

    Reply
    1. By Steve White on

      Eeek! A typo! It is not Consolea but Thunnus vitiosus.

      Reply
    2. By Justin on

      Undergrads, I think. They have a point, but notice how the hypothesis doesn’t account for the Pass of Fire in Panama.

      I’m guessing it’s a combination of cold water and topography. Flashies mostly dwell in shallow water – just like accounts of Old Earth piranhas – and there’s nothing but open ocean east of New Britain.

      Reply
    3. By donald johnson on

      // July, 1956 issue of Scientific American-Clan magazine//
      where is this issue :-)
      I feel that the flasher is the main food for the mountain fish so the deep water loving mountain fish eat the schooling flasher whenever they school out into the Deep waters of the Pacific.

      Reply
  21. By Joe Thorsky on

    Some good point all!

    In further refining on this postulate; consider the possibility/likelihood that the entire Destroyermen
    Planet itself has been inart(ifully)ficially biologically terrrareformed and “is” behaving/acting as the multidimensional and multiple historical timeline energy collector. Guided by biology and the basic principle that the more complex an organism becomes it’s loss of efficiency becomes ever more pronounced and significant. Such erector set barriers, filters and governors inhibiting perfect
    energy efficiency/conversion would explain a lot…
    A most noteworthy subject for a research article perfect for eventual publication inside an issue of
    “Scientific American-Clan” magazine.

    Reply
    1. By Alexey Shiro on

      Well, it is possible. And pretty interesting, idea, must admit!

      Reply
  22. By Joe Thorsky on

    Taylor-Everyone

    One of the remaining unanswered outstanding mysteries and questions inadequately postulated or explained so far, concerns the exact process and the nature of the transport methodology and mechanism/system that is/was used to displace and transport/insert all of the various historically altered cultures and societies into Taylor’s Destroyermen’s World. Could the entire process be one exclusively biological in construct; and might the very existence, presence and migratory practices of the indigenous Mountain Fish also have something significant
    to do with it? Are they possibly the perfect energy collectors and biological machines with the added capability/capacity to even tap into, leech off, collect
    and store energy from various multiple different dimensions and numerous historical timelines?
    Does this make all of the assembled, displaced and transported Destroyermen and Courtney Bradford a “matter of/in? fact” a physical material byproduct of this process?
    “Stuff happens!” I guess.
    Just something else to ponder over and muse about in this eternally long interregnum since “Blood in the Water”.

    Reply
    1. By Alexey Shiro on

      Basically we knew nothing against mechanism of transfer. It SEEMS that it’s at least semi-intelligent (i.e. there is something that control the Squall), but the scale of its intelligent is complete mystery – as well as the origin of Squall.

      (My personal IMHO – the Squall is a part of some interdimensional transport system, build by some greatly advanced interdimensional civilization. This system is controlled by some sort of automatic system or even AI, and seems to malfunction. It is possible, that the system was abandoned long ago – maybe the civilization that constructed it no longer existed – and the system started to work on its own)

      Reply
      1. By Charles Simpson on

        Very good Alexey. Well it’s either that, or some not well understood natural phenomena. Perhaps the Destroyermen’s world is the original and it’s some artifact of multi dimensional physics bringing samples of other alternate worlds back to the original.

        Reply
        1. By Alexey Shiro on

          Quite probable. I’m not sure about “natural” – it seems… a bit too selective, to be just mindless natural power. But it may be natural in that meaning that the Squall is caused by some bizzare interdimensional lifeform – “void creature” of some kind, with the ability to create such phenomenons.

          Still, I prefer artifical theory)

          Reply
          1. By Paul Nunes on

            The Squall is attracted to metallic objects…. So whoever built/designed/maintained such a system…. Either used metal ships or used the system to plunder refined metals from parallel dimensions.

            The new Britons came through because of all the cannon aboard their ships…..

            Notice polynesians or aborigines?

            The only thing that defies this explanation is the pre-Columbian civilizations in MesoAmerica.

          2. By Charles Simpson on

            On the previous incarnation of the author’s web page he mentined the meso Americans came by way of a land transfer. Remember also the meso-Americans had gold objects even some native copper objects. Even the Malays had knives and axes of metal possibly fish hooks and harpoons of metal, not to mention metal cooking pots.

  23. By Alexey Shiro on

    Guys, I made… well, let’s call it “Mountain fish prototype”:

    http://s018.radikal.ru/i502/1607/29/d1da1595bc78.png

    Must admit, that I was inspired by the asian catfish in the fishtank of our Academy) Kinda like this littkle guy; he is lying for hours on bottom, totally immobile, then suddenly dart to the surface to gulp some air.

    Anywhay, to the M’fish:

    – They aren’t from Destroyermen world. They aren’t related to any known animals. In their world, the evolution vent different way hundreds of millions years ago – they differ on the level of upper taxons (probably even kingdoms, i.e. they as far from humans as bacterias)

    – They have completely different biochemistry, and even on cellular level they just haven’t got analogues.

    – Their skeleton is based on geodesic frames, and became highly metalized with age. Basically, they have partially metal bones. And probably more than one spine.

    – Their nervous system is based much more on electrical impulses than on chemical. They have uncanny electric conductivity in neurons… and VERY good reaction. Basically, if Grik-Kakka would bite the M’fish at the tail (let’s assume that this was very dumb Gri-Kakka), the M’fish would twich BEFORE the Gri-Kakka would be able to unclench jaws.

    – The large hole on her head is NOT an actual mouth. The actual mount are far inside; and this is the opening of expandable filtration chamber, which also work as a part of ram-flow coolant system. The M’fish could expand the filtration chamber a few times, to either suck a full shoal of small fises, or to “bite” a large prey. The exaust slit are visible on the underside.

    – They move by preforming vertical undulations of their body and tail – like whales and dolphins. They also have ventral fin for stability and a lot of flipper-like extremities – for maneuvering and also wave-forming, to control water flow around their bodies.

    – They used methanol-hydrogen protons reaction to store the energy inside their bodies. This allow them to actually store enough for short high-speed bursts… or long deep dives. Probably could lie a few days in depth without surfacing (of course, only if they are moving very slowly…)

    Reply
  24. By William Curry on

    It’s possible that the mountain fish absorb O2 through the skin like a salamander and can do this from both water and air. While lying quiet that absorb to a higher level of saturation than needed for the resting state, then use this extra saturation to support brief bursts of extreme activity.

    Reply
    1. By Alexey Shiro on

      Hm! Possible, but only if their skin are thin enough. Or, they may have some oxygen-absorbing fins, for example.

      I wonder, could they use some sort of natural hydrogen fuel cells to conserve the energy?

      Reply
      1. By William Curry on

        Maybe they reabsorb their flatulence (mostly methane) from their bowel and concentrate it in bladders where it can be used to blow ballast chambers or excrete it for extra thrust. :-)

        Reply
  25. By Alexey Shiro on

    About mountain fishes:

    http://nautil.us/issue/34/adaptation/can-a-living-creature-be-as-big-as-a-galaxy

    Seems that the Mountain Fishes aren’t just “another evolution possibility” – they are probably no close to any known Earth animals than bacterias. They are more alien to humans than even plants and fungis. They must have some completely unkown thermodynamic system to mantain metabolic rate, some really strudy materials in their skeleton and ligament, and their chemistry must be cpmpletely weird by any standards of Earth biochemistry.

    So… basically how could they look like? They are enormous, they are basically filters (but they sometimes like to chow something more than plankton, hovewer), they could move really fast for sea animals… Oh, and they are quiet. They could move relatively silently, which is truly amazing for the creature of the size of supercarrier – and they didn’t like loud sounds or acoustic pulces from sonar.

    What else we knew about them?

    Reply
    1. By donald johnson on

      My vision of a mountain fish is a large version of a sculpin or similar wait and pounce hunter. They start small and never stop growing. 25% to 50% growrh per season. And live up to 250 years. They only die when they outgrow their food suply and starve to death. They will eat anything smaller than they are including other mountain fish. The males are much smaller than the females and live as internal parasites so mating is for life. This is same as several fish that exist presently in the deep trenches.

      Reply
      1. By Alexey Shiro on

        The problem is, how the fish could possibly mantain such growth speed all her life? The energy requirements would basically boil her alive in the heat of her metabolysm.

        I’m not sure, what form the mountain fishses have, but I think, they should have truly enormous radiator fins, just to get rid of excess heat. In fact, probably more than 2/3 of their lenght are nothing more than giant radiator fins. And how something this big could move so fast? The muscle power should be really tremendous…

        Definitedly not fishes. Definitely not anything, even remotedly known to mankind. Some species – I could bet that the Mountain Fishes ancestors were brought by Squall from another world – probably as far evolutionary from humans as bacterias. Or even farther.

        Hm… I really should try to draw such creature…

        Reply
        1. By Alexey Shiro on

          I think more of something like REALLY big manta ray, at least in therms of form.

          Reply
          1. By Alexey Shiro on

            Would work in Warhammer, but Destroyermen are the “hard” sci-fi) No, such creature must have completely different form…

        2. By donald johnson on

          As they are basically lie in weight predators in my vision there Heat problems are minimized and it could be the growth rate would reduce as they get older. If you realize that the 25% growth rate in total mass is not as great as you think remember if something is twice as big in length it is 8 times the mass. Water passing through the gills also makes great heat radiators because the blood carries the heat out of the muscles and into the gills thereby reducing the heat load. When a fish is 50 yards long and that would be a small mountain fish 10 miles an hour is a very small percentage of the body length per second. This small amount of speed which most boats prior to the Destroyer men. And just the Act of opening their mouth and touching it to squeeze water past the gills would allow it to suck water increases the speed of the water entering the fish and decreases the ability of a boat or other food to escape.

          Reply
          1. By Alexey Shiro on

            //vWater passing through the gills also makes great heat radiators because the blood carries the heat out of the muscles and into the gills thereby reducing the heat load.//

            Yes, but the problem is, this way of heat exchange have limits. And hundred-thousand-ton living mass produce A LOT of heat. They need some highly specialized heat-exchange system, more effective than just blood circulation. Probably some sort of venting channel throught the body, with water flowing through them.

          2. By donald johnson on

            There will need to be lots of heat exchange and if the sculpin model I proposed would be accurate then there would be aproximatly 1/3rd of the body as gills. You will note that the humped back of the sculpin is mostly bone and fins attached and not muscle. This is also the mountain that you would see if fish is at the surface. The gills are inside this structure. Active muscle is a heat generator but inactive muscles do not create near as much heat. The tempory heat load of short spurts of movements should not generate enough heat to endanger the fish. However if this is the case then the fish will need move out of the tropics into cooler waters and so far this does not seem to be the case as reports of them have only been in the tropics.

          3. By donald johnson on

            Do not fotget that the fins also are heat exchangers as well and they are most likely fery large structures as well with large teansfering surfaces

        3. By matthieu on

          I think that you’re right: there is no way for our biology to create such a thing. We can calculate the energy needed to move it and it would be gigantic. It means that it needs a lot of energy but this supply is limited. He may use sun’s energy and store it for short term demand in batteries!

          Reply
          1. By Alexey Shiro on

            We also have the nerve problem. The speed of nerve impulses is limited by the speed of chemical process. The 300 m creature with chemical nerves would took a few minutes just to notice that someone is chewing its tail. And than several minutes to just twich the tail.

            To be even marginally fast in reaction, the mountain fish must have nerve conduction velocity of about 250-300 meters per second. Definitely no Earth creature have anything like that. Their nerves must be much more electric than chemical…

            Wait a second.

            Fast nerve conduction, tremendously powerfull muscles, little heat exaust…

            WE HAVE NATURAL LOW-TEMP SUPERCONDUCTORS JUST FLOATING AROUND!!!

          2. By Justin on

            Somehow, I highly doubt the Union’d be able to make a train run on mountain fish…

          3. By Alexey Shiro on

            Train? They could build the railguns capable of sending slugs on the tens of kilometers per second speed) Or transport electric power on basically any distance from powerplant) Just imagine, how much you could do with natural high-temp superconductor….

          4. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

            I love this discussion. Remember, they are often seen sunning themselves on the surface–and are often called “island fish” as well . . .

          5. By Alexey Shiro on

            // Remember, they are often seen sunning themselves on the surface–and are often called “island fish” as well . . .//

            Hm… You hint that they may not be actually natural? Artifical lifeforms?

          6. By William Curry on

            Well the organism is sitting in a very good heat sink. It may be that there is an extensive network of blood vessels and capillaries in the skin and thus the blood transmits heat by conduction to the water the animal is in. While sitting on the surface, it may spray itself with water adding evaporative cooling just like a cooling tower. The latent heat of vaporization is almost 1000 btu’s per pound of water evaporated.

          7. By Alexey Shiro on

            Still the radiators and heat exchangers must be highly specialized organ systems – without any analogues of any known species.

            And not forget, that the M’Fishes could actually move pretty fast. The ammount of heat they produce during short run would probably exceed the output of battleship’s powerplant.

            And the structural integrity to hold such body together, and attach muscles to skeleton… Not to mention, nervous system three times faster than any known.

            Definitedly completely alien specie.

          8. By William Curry on

            There is nothing unusual about either blood close to the skin surface being used for cooling or evaporative cooling. Elephants use both. The ears are large radiators with many blood vessels and they spray water on themselves for cooling. And elephants are not immersed usually in a good heat sink like an ocean.

          9. By Alexey Shiro on

            William, we are talking about the creature of tens of thousands – possibly hundreds of thousand – tons. The M’fish is IMMENSELY bigger than even blue wake (which are much, much smaller).

            For such mass, the blood flow as cooling is just almost nothing. They didn’t have blood circulation system that worked like heat exchanger – they must have enormous heat exchanger, that have additional function as blood circulation system.

          10. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

            Ha! No, not at all, Alexey. I did NOT mean to imply they are constructs of any kind. But they ARE weird, and the “natural superconductor” notion is pretty slick. Also, don’t forget that they don’t rely entirely on external cooling. And the engineering isn’t quite as far-fetched as has been implied: A few have been described as “almost as big as a Home,” the biggest of which is @ 1,000 feet. Given a propensity to exaggeration, I’d say the very biggest MIGHT BE @ 6-700 feet long, and the vast majority would therefore probably be somewhere @ 2-300 feet. Not the 900 METERS I think I saw someone suggest, though I may have misread. I imagine the one that got Princess Rebecca’s ship was probably one of these: Probably less than than twice the length of the ship, but with a very large mouth. Imagine a 10 pound bass attacking your 1/72″ scale ship model.
            Unlike early descriptions of dinosaurs being too heavy to walk around so they had to wade to support their weight, MFs really have almost no limitation of that sort since they ARE supported by water. And look at the great sharks:–not comparing–but they are fine examples of creatures with almost no bones being quite strong, agile and energetic underwater. Mix many different physiologies. And who knows? Maybe they started out as land-dwelling sauropods?
            This is fun.
            Oh, and as for the speed, remember that it can only be sustained very briefly. No explanation has been made of this because none of the characters have any frame of reference. Energy consumption is only one reason. As you have pointed out, obviously, they have to dissipate heat. This is done in a variety of ways. They ARE air-breathers, that’s established, but surely they have evolved specialized, even gill-like heat exchangers when their mouths are open in “pursuit” mode, cooling inside and out. And perhaps the forward part of their bodies are mostly thin-walled “mouth,” and they are relatively hollow for a large percentage of their length–almost like the inside of “cartoon whales” :) This is even consistent with the only described “sonar returns” on a MF!
            And as Matthieu proposes, perhaps there IS a mechanism for absorbing solar radiation as energy? Electrical energy that augments the superconductor neural pathways? I’m just playing, but when you make something up completely “out of bounds” which you must all admit I rarely ever do, the fun thing is to figure out how it could possibly BE, not why it CAN’T possibly be! At least it is to me. :)
            Hmm. I like–I think it was Alexey’s?–description of long and relatively narrow, but add a huge mouth with an expanding “gullet” for large area filtration (and chomping). Lying with this gullet inflated for flotation on the surface would certainly make them LOOK much broader/larger than they are.
            Finally, since nobody has ever strung one up and measured it, how do we KNOW they are actually as big as they look? The natural reaction when you see a percentage of a creature exposed above the water is to compare it to “known” animals, and the percentage THEY leave submerged. Since everybody is scared to death of them, again, the natural tendency is to OVER estimate their size. They are “fish”, after all!
            Actually though, some have been seen from the air, probably revealing their entire length, but never directly alongside something of known length! I sure know how hard it is to tell how big and how far away a wild hog is when it’s standing in the middle of a field with no fence posts or anything else around it to use for a size reference!
            Anyway, GENERALLY, I’d say the largest most often observed are probably @ 3X the size, if not the mass, of a blue whale. Still challenging to justify, but let’s start there.

          11. By matthieu on

            Well, we can work on 200m long, with a big mouth

            Their body is protected by bernacle and the mouth is highly armored. The body itself is gigantic with H² bags, and internal pump system. Feeding is done
            – by not moving the fish attracts birds and the guano is absorbed by the skin and moved in “ballast tanks” full of algae. Thanks to an elaborate natural flow system (warm/cold water captured deep thanks to a long extension), they move close to the skin which does allow blue and green light.
            – when the fish moves it uses a bone made pump jet powered by sun light and energy is stored in body cells that look like hydrogen / air batteries (600V 1A for each pack).

          12. By Alexey Shiro on

            //of long and relatively narrow, but add a huge mouth with an expanding “gullet” for large area filtration (and chomping). Lying with this gullet inflated for flotation on the surface would certainly make them LOOK much broader/larger than they are.//

            Started to work on M’fish model… by the way, what colour are they? Their eyesight are probably not very good (most of aquatic creatures prefer hearing, smelling or electrical sensors), so I doubt that they are brightly coloured.

          13. By donald johnson on

            I am glad that Taylor is giving us more information about the mountain fish. I am glad that his vision is the same as mine using the basis of a sculpin shaped fish. Between 600 and 1000 feet long would be about 150 to 200 feet high if it were a sculpin shaped fish. The mouth of a sculpin that sized would easily be able to grab and hold a ship 300 feet long. Note I did not say swallow.
            If lying on the surface it eould probably resemble a 25 foot high and 50 foot wide and 100 to 200 foot long island.
            It is most likely uses acustics to hunt si woukd really hate the noises of propellers and paddle wheels. However these would attract it more than repel it. The loud ping of a sonar though would cause it to go somewhere else as it would hurt the ears.
            I also feel that it would have distributed processing nodes in its body so that the only thing going to the main brain were danger/threat signals such as sonar with the rest being simple food/ignore signals handled by the local processors. Local processors will speed up reaction time several orders of speed.
            We must remember that many present animals have distributed processing though most higher hanmals do not other than the so called muscle memory of constantly used actions.
            We can not forget that the brain is actually just a specialized muscle that developed differantly during evolution.

      2. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

        I always imagined various attributes of a type of sculpin, just for looks. Ugly boogers. Beyond that. Alexey, feel free to play based on the various things we’ve discussed. I agree by the way, though they have fairly large eyes (about the size of a pre-contact ‘Cat shield, say . . . a trash can lid . . . I don’t imagine they would need terribly good eyesight since they are so sound sensitive. They are probably colored much like a sperm whale. Dark on top, possibly lighter below.

        Reply
    1. By Steve White on

      Great image. Usually we see T rex posed more upright — this shows that he’s a LONG, nasty brute!

      Reply
      1. By Matthieu on

        Reall cook but maybe a little bit too large, no?

        What’s really strange in that the lizard looks like my mother in law :)

        Reply
          1. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

            You are a Bad Man, Matthieu. One of the reasons I like you.

          2. By Matthieu on

            lol! When I told her that my wife had some medical problems and she was guilty (we were joking, it’s just some mild back pain, she told me “no refund or exchange”.

            More seriously, I’ve got a question: I don’t know anything about dinos so I’m wondering how much food they need.

            Same question for griks. Here are some relevant questions:

            What’s their weight?
            How much food do they need daily?
            Do they have to eat daily?
            How do they save energy for later? (fat? sugar? glycogene?)
            How much water to they need?
            How efficient is their intestine system?

      1. By donald johnson on

        I am not an artist so I just cut and paste and hope for the best.

        Reply
  26. By Charles Simpson on

    In Technical Discussions we were discussing Linguistics and Introduced a couple of the terms used in Anthropology on language. Taylor wrote //Who knew, for example, that Charles was such a linguistic expert? I never even heard of a phoneme before. (In Silva mode) “Ain’t that the stink critters give off when they’re pixel-ated?”// Likely Courtney who is a generlist might know the terms ‘phonemes’ the small units of sound that a language uses to make it’s words, and ‘morpheme’ a $20 word for words :) Thus Courtney can speak of language with $20 words perhaps if he does a section on the Lemurian Language.

    Reply
  27. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

    By the way, Charles perceptively noted that there WAS a LITTLE new info in the “forward” posted above: That (by 1956, at least) theories regarding the origins of Lemurians may be changing. What other assumptions might be under review by that time?

    Reply
    1. By Charles Simpson on

      Probably definite that the Gentaa are not human-lemurian hybrids. Possibly on closer contact the 1847 Americans did not come from the same world as the destroyermen, say slavery was abolished or something. or Riza-sab-at and Dennis Silva produce a love child that shows the Gentaa are hybrids?

      Reply
      1. By Alexey Shiro on

        //or Riza-sab-at and Dennis Silva produce a love child that shows the Gentaa are hybrids?//

        HERESY!!!

        Reply
      2. By Clifton Sutherland on

        “Riza-sab-at and Dennis Silva produce a love child that shows the Gentaa are hybrids?”

        But they shall not. Right? RIGHT?!

        Reply
        1. By Alexey Shiro on

          I really hope so. Not that i’m conservative, or, Heaven forbid, hypocrite, but it would make no sense from all biological points of view.

          Reply
        2. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

          The long-awaited, definitive answer to this momentous mystery WILL be addressed in a manner, possibly satisfactory to all :), in Blood In The Water! A great deal more about the Gentaa will be revealed in it–and the next.

          Reply
          1. By Alexey Shiro on

            Sigh… it would took at least a few weeks after the 14 June for the book to be delivered in Russia… :(

          2. By donald johnson on

            Hmmm maybe we can get Alexey a UPS copy :-)

          3. By donald johnson on

            I just realized that I can order a book and get it delivered free with a discount to my local barns and noble. Then maybe we can use the savings to ship the book to Alexey overnight (or at least faster than book delivery). I will check on this.

    2. By donald johnson on

      //We had few open conflicts with the League at first, though they seemed inexplicably intent on subversion. Eventually we discovered their ultimate aim was . . .//

      At the rate of one a year I won’t be around for 1956 so will we need to encourage Taylor to speed up the book rate a bit. :-) two a year :-)

      Reply
      1. By Charles Simpson on

        Unfortunately seeing answers from other authors the publisher decides the rate books in a series appear. Taylor might be able to write faster, but the publisher will continue one a year. Missing a dead line can make us wait an extra year too, as publisher like only so many new books a month and it might be twelve months later for an opening. The point being it’s not under Taylor’s control, and from what I’ve read from other authors he’s lucky to get as much cover art input as he does.

        Reply
    3. By Joe Thorsky on

      Taylor:
      Courtney Bradford’s first missive and treatise on the concept of mercy as that one most unique character trait (biological byproduct?) acquired, evolved ,inherited or otherwise attributed to the species of Homo Sapiens (Man) misdirects and misapplies the attention and inquiry away from the more significant and important events that were/are also transpiring to and are common to each of the three(?) known Sentient species in the Destroyermen Saga.
      With this context in mind, it just seems to me, at least, that the major focus and direction of Courtney’s inquiry and investigation should concentrate more directly on those uniquely common biological and evolutionary events that have resulted and have led to the development of the three? dominant Sentient species in the Destroyermen’s World. Namely, the Grik, the Lemurians and Man.
      The most obvious singular point of time to concentrate on within the life-cycle of each of these three these Sentient species is that one particular series of special biological events where/when not only Sentient individuality, self-awareness and independent thought/ action occurs and appears both among and within the Species. Taken altogether with the outward passage of time itself; just when/how and under what conditions and (inside/outside) influences did each of these Sentient species begin the process of evolving/ developing complex social/cultural structures and organizations (divisions of Labor) to maintain and advance species existence and survivability? This remains that supreme unanswered question; for now.

      Alexey:
      After the cessation of hostilities, the mass production, Destroyermen worldwide distribution and the social-cultural interspecies marketing/advertising of Seep,that most wondrous medicinal elixir and miracle concoction and cure all should be one of the more likely successful post war industries/businesses to quickly develop, grow and prosper.
      A so called recipe of (FDA?) recommended ingredients used in Seep’s manufacture/production just might be found at:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MI3YzuzwK44

      Bottles of Seep,
      Bottles of Seep,
      The best overall cure all there is for a hangover.
      It will ease all those aches and eliminate those nastiest of pains.
      Mends all broken bones, bullet wounds and deadly whiffle ball sprains.
      Gotta get me a hogs head full of that medicinal lotion do-over!

      Bottles of Seep,
      Bottles of Seep,
      A Loving potion number mine to keep on.
      It makes for Grik and Lemurian not want other each to eat.
      Don’t ever want them to war again and ever get bbq(ed)and sober,
      but together to sleep,to work and to ever play, rewound over and over.
      Makes heaps of empties and free Seep for me able to drink.
      So! Sack(e) me another bottle to nip on!

      Reply
  28. By Charles Simpson on

    Just had a call from Taylor Anderson on Fan-Fic he asked his publisher and well you know lawyers not only might Taylor get sued but his publisher so he is asking us not to post fan-fic. You know lawyers who removed monkey bars from play grounds. To quote the Wicked Witch of the West from the movie ‘the Wizard of Oz’ 1935, “What a world, what a world!”

    Reply
    1. By Charles Simpson on

      Note for those who don’t hit the home discussion page that often here is what Taylor Wrote:

      Note:

      I finally got “The Word” from my publisher. I didn’t want to have to bring this up, but I must–

      I have no problem with Fan-Fiction. I know it happens, and I’m actually honored that that it does. It’s gratifying that my stories inspire people to creatively express their vision or version of events within them. However, for legal reasons I won’t read it, so please don’t send it to me–or post it here.

      I’ve been advised to post this disclaimer:

      Taylor Anderson is the original creator of the Destroyermen World, and everything that happens in it. By the act of writing, painting, drawing, or otherwise creating anything that borrows inspiration from that world, characters, or any events portrayed, wherever you present it, you expressly acknowledge Taylor Anderson as the source of that inspiration, and will never hold him liable for any perceived exploitation of your work, inspired by him.

      Sorry I have to do this. If I didn’t, we’d have to stop all the interactive things we do on this site, including model and art contests. It’s certainly not about choking off your creativity, it’s about avoiding lawsuits.

      Reply
      1. By donald johnson on

        Enter My World and Live by my publishers rules!

        Reply
        1. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

          Yeah. Sometimes I think I like “my” world better than the one we live in. It’s crazy when somebody not only can–but would have the GALL–to sue somebody (who they took the idea from in the first place)for maybe or maybe not using “their” idea put down a fan-fic! I GUESS I can’t blame the publisher though. The way things are, some human bacteria might sue me, them, the computer manufacturer, and the power company that provided the electricity. Better safe, I suppose, than sorry–for demonstrating where Silva got his “Don’t get mad, an’ gettin”even’ is for weenies. Get SATISFACTION” streak from.

          Reply
          1. By Generalstarwars333 on

            But but but but it’s fanfiction! The whole idea is to enjoy it, not make money!
            (semi changing train of thought)
            Actually, if that’s the case, then Bungie may or may not be able to sue the guys who write the Ha-I’m offtopic…
            (Changing back to the original comment stuffs)
            Don’t forget the company that provided the coal/oil/whatever to the power company, the company that took it to the power company, and the people that mined it.

          2. By donald johnson on

            And how about the miners, their wives who fed them etc.

          3. By Clifton Sutherland on

            Sigh, there must be a way to have a little of both. Surely not all fans of a series who want to write something do it with the sole intention of gaining money by sueing the author? I mean, that was my plan all along, but you know, you gotta adapt. Perhaps I’ll go rob a bank to make my fortune.

            But, in all seriousness, how often does something like what the publishers are worried about actually happen?

          4. By Generalstarwars333 on

            IDK. I’ve always kind of assumed that the guys that made whatever the fan fiction is fan fiction for(in this case taylor) automagically owned it legally and stuff like on the KSP forums.

          5. By Alexey Shiro on

            I wonder: why couldn’t some legal compromize be found, like, some sort of “legal fanfiction”? For example, fanfiction placed only on the author’s site, and writers must agree as a pre-condition that they waive any rights on it?

          6. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

            That actually seemed the best idea to me, Alexey. If I encouraged it here, it would probably only happen here, and I’d be MORE likely to see what somebody else wrote and avoid it, or ask their permission to include it. I may talk to my own lawyer and try to come up with a workaround, but in the meantime I better adhere to the publisher’s wishes.

          7. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

            And General, the case could be made for exactly that–and would probably prevail–but just dealing with the lawsuit is time-consuming and expensive. Human bacteria who file those kinds of suits rely on their victims settling, to make the nuisance go away. (I never would, of course, even if legal fees bankrupted me–and I’d counter sue for maximum “satisfaction”) but again, I wouldn’t be writing while I was pre-occupied with that, so nobody really wins. It’s a crummy situation. Like I told Alexey, I’ll talk to my own lawyer and try to figure out a compromise. In the meantime, feel free to post the fan-fic elsewhere. I have no problem with it and won’t sue YOU for it! Maybe someday, at least, when the current series ends and I start something else, we can have all the D-Men fan-fic we want right here.

          8. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

            Clifton, I was given a couple of high-profile examples, but I doubt it happens very often. Still, once is all it takes for companies to flip. And again, since they have no direct control over what I say or do here, I can see how it would make them especially uncomfortable. Like I’ve said, I’ll try to figure out a workaround that will make everybody happy.

        2. By Matthieu on

          This is very american! I understand that the lawers idea is that somebody could coulplain about the fact that you’re using their ideas.

          Come here. Here the law is more “ok, you write fan fiction but you don’t own the universe, the author does. You think that he stole your ideas? Too bad for you, not get out from here and let us come back to important things, and BTW you pay the legal fines”.

          Reply
          1. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

            I agree with you completely, Matthieu. Litigiousness has run amok in this country, and there have been numerous efforts to promote tort reform and move to a system similar to what you describe.

            Personally, I like the idea of legalized dueling to settle personal disputes. :) You could do it like this:
            a. No “proxies” allowed. If it is discovered that you hired someone to make a challenge, you are guilty of attempted murder.
            b. You have to get an expensive license for a specific duel, that requires a 6 month cooling off period. A duel cannot go forward after a public apology. Not sure whether the license fee should be refunded. there are arguments for and against. For–you don’t think “well, I’ve paid my money. Might as well do it.” Against–it is prohibitively expensive, and keeps people from making frivolous challenges.
            c. smoothbore flintlock pistols are the only acceptable weapon. Swords would be cool, but physicality would be a factor, and 6 months is long enough for anyone to get good with a pistol.
            d. There could be a variety of other hoops, but essentially, once people jump through all of them and show up on the appointed day, chances are, they were mad enough to kill each other anyway. This would likely be extremely rare.

            The advantage is, people would be more civil to one another, and one way or another, an aggrieved party would get satisfaction. Even if the other party bailed, they could loudly proclaim them to be a loathsome coward, unwilling to stand up for their principles–without worrying about a slander suit.

            Oh, I know in the real world, there are all kinds of problems with this, (politicians would be fighting duels–or publicly apologizing–every day). . . which on second thought, isn’t a bad idea . . . Oh well, it’s fun to think about sometimes. :)

          2. By donald johnson on

            Come on Taylor no limits other than minimum, 100 yard range and a 2 inch barrel and 3 rounds with no repeats.

          3. By Charles Simpson on

            I always liked flame throwers at twenty feet no winners, no losers, and both argumentative idiots removed from the gene pool.

          4. By Alexey Shiro on

            //I always liked flame throwers at twenty feet no winners, no losers, and both argumentative idiots removed from the gene pool.//

            “…Oh, I could recommend my friend: he knew the duel code perfectly, and also have two brooms, perfectly fitted for fighting till the death. Or, you could arrange a duel on a meat grinders – much more elegant. Each wound is definitely deadly, the wounded enemy is mechanically turned into the cutlet.”

            (c, “The Twelve Chairs” by Ilf&Petrov)

          5. By Matthieu on

            That’s an interesting point of view. Quite original. Who would pay for the medical bill?

            Do you have in your legal system something like the “not so stupid rule”. Explanation: you can sue people but you’ll win only if what you’ve done is not completely stupid. For example if you drink a hot coffee in your car and you complain because you burned yourself the judge will say “ok, driving and drinking at the same time is stupid and forbidden, so you’re dismissed”.

          6. By William Curry on

            The US doesn’t have a single legal system. Each state has it’s own and they vary. One thing trial layers do is venue shopping, trying to find a jurisdiction where they think there case has the best chance. The US also has “class action lawsuits”. This is where lawyers get to represent a “class” of people, they don’t actually have to have a client. Also a lot of lawsuits are filed for to make life difficult for somebody else.. If you loose one of these you almost never have to pay the legal costs of the person whom you sued. Lawyer groups have strong lobbying efforts to make sure that their goldmines continues to operate. In civil cases the federal courts have to apply state law. There is no federal common law, each state has it’s own. In the state that I live in, the common law of the state is defined as the common law of England and statutes of Parliament in furtherance as they existed on a particular day during the reign of James I. I’ve seen cases turn on very old precedent preceding James I. Especially real property cases as all land title traces back to the colonial charters and what was written in them.

          7. By donald johnson on

            We could always sue the publisher for not allowing Taylor to publish faster :-)

            Is that the publisher I hear screaming??

          8. By donald johnson on

            //Do you have in your legal system something like the “not so stupid rule”. Explanation: you can sue people but you’ll win only if what you’ve done is not completely stupid. For example if you drink a hot coffee in your car and you complain because you burned yourself the judge will say “ok, driving and drinking at the same time is stupid and forbidden, so you’re dismissed”.//

            Tell this to Mc Donalds or was it Jack in the Box, they lost a case where the person suing was carying their hot coffee in their crotch in a moving car and spilled it due to car hitting a bump or something and sued and won! Supposedly the coffee was over 140 degrees which the jury thought was too hot. (I think that is too cold !!)

          9. By Charles Simpson on

            //We could always sue the publisher for not allowing Taylor to publish faster :-)

            Is that the publisher I hear screaming??
            //

            You can sue for that, the judge would probably dismiss the suit as it is a business decision. Now your lawyer would warn you that you have little chance of winning, least you sue him/her. You would pay the lawyer to continue the suit.

            Why the one book a year rule? First it takes Taylor some time to write and edit the manuscript. He sends the manuscript to the publisher who edits, not just his English but portions his editor thinks makes the story drag too much (Taylor’s chapters on the cutting room floor.) Cover art must be commissioned and the artist given time to do the art. Taylor’s illustrations and maps may have to be redone Remember there are unions involved. and differences in opinion on what to cut ironed out. Then Taylor does his final edit.

            This is a business arrangement Taylor is payed for his efforts by the publisher, the publisher is payed by the profits from selling the books, providing jobs for editors, cover illustrators, printers, etc. We the readers get entertainment from buying the books from a good story teller. We are fortunate that Taylor enjoys his work enough to interact with his fans as much as he does, many authors don’t. I for one would love to see what went on the cutting room floor posted.

          10. By donald johnson on

            Actually I am aware of the problems with publishing and writing. I have a friend with 10 or so books out there that i have been the local proof reader for and layout specialist. she can type on a typewriter but not on a computer. she never uses the tab key or centering so every time she submits to her editor I have to come over and clean it up for her. reading the same stuff over and over and cleaning up the same mistakes gets boring real fast. Luckily I can proofread at 2000 wpm +. Never did learn to type with more than 2 fingers though due to dyslexia.

    2. By Charles Simpson on

      Poste the notice on the Association and Wiki page on Face book. I mentioned Taylor is considering posting his cutting room floor chapters that the publisher cut as slowing the action too much. Told Lanney Taylot Sid High to the tall one; Lanney wrote back: “Tell Taylor I said hi right back at him….and you, too, Charles, for passing on Taylor’s greeting.” Steve White a recent newbee here wrote, “That would be interesting: the backfill would be appreciated by regular readers, and it might also serve to hook new readers.” I’m sure all there would love to see the cutting room floor chapters.

      Join the Destroyermen Fan Association and feel free to post Destroyermen Fan Fic there: https://www.facebook.com/groups/566578383510306/

      Reply
      1. By donald johnson on

        Posting the clippings yesterday would be a good thing

        Reply
        1. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

          Look up at the top of the page. Not exactly a clipping, but a new “get ’em up to speed” for the book after next. Note, I deleted any reference to events in the upcoming! :)

          Reply
          1. By Charles Simpson on

            Not quite “(Growing evidence may confirm they sprang from a parallel line, and only the most distant ancestor connects them to lemurs, but “Lemurians” has stuck).” is new information on Lemurians.

          2. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

            Sshhh! Ha! I thought you would get a kick out of that. Not much of a spoiler, though. Actually fairly obvious to “regulars” here.

          3. By Generalstarwars333 on

            (looks up in surprise and bewilderment)

  29. By Charles Simpson on

    Another form of Fan fic lettes from a recruit to his younger brother. Note this is practice English and improves as they continue.

    Little brother Maak
    December, 14, 1944

    Dear sibling,

    Part training of English write I letters home must do. First this warn soldier be not good we thought. Train soldier not good, do same over over over, Sargent say so not have think just do. Practice wooden cutlass have led make heavy more real cutlass.

    First week learn walk, turn all same. Also run do exercise strong make us.

    Taas

    ———————————

    December 23, 1944
    Little sibling,

    Training same walk turn just big bunch name platoon. Male order give Lieutenant now. Still exercise make strong. Tailess one celebrate birth anerversry maker all thing their two day. come.. we get day rest. Practice cutlass fight with other recruits.

    Taas

    ——————————–

    December 30, 1944

    Maak

    Week this get rifle, sergeant teach clean, take apart put together, and shoot. I learn well. Put knife call bayonet on end rifle train use spear. After midmeal practice walk turn as huge group company called order given by female called captain. Like Tailess we three times not two like the people. Early morning we exercise much then eat breakfast we call first meal. Food all same not good like mother make not spice. Life soldier too busy think do, too tired do fun thing, Time off clean gear, gear not clean you get punishment, clean latrine, help cook, extra march punishment. Got fitted in wet armor that fit close have quilted under shirt take bumps hit is.

    Sibling wish not army be life hard danger great. Army not good life you do only what told. Too tired to life enjoy. This life us catfaces

    Taas

    ——————————–

    January 6, 1945

    Maak

    This week we only allowed speak English, learned to move in open field method, some shoot others advance. Learn to use Blitzerbug, pistol, and Machine gun called familiarization. We will board a fast freighter next week bound for Madaa-gas-car will write when arrive. Sargent say he sorry for us training rushed need troops now we go Second Corps replace dead. Sargent say keep eyes and ears open our mouths shut and do what veterans do we may survive. Younger sibling don’t join the army get job making things for army or navy to do your bit. None of us brave enough to say it but we are all scared.

    Taas

    Reply
    1. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

      I like this very much, Charles. I’m still waiting on “the word” from Penguin regarding Fan Fic, and when I hear, I hope to have a special page for general stuff like this. Very good.

      Reply
    2. By Generalstarwars333 on

      Well. That was indeed brilliant. Have a cookie. Infact, don’t just have one, have negative five.

      Reply
      1. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

        How rude. I think he deserves at least five positive cookies.:) It is plausible, and adds to the perception of the universality of Lemurians as “people” that I have always tried to foster.

        Reply
        1. By Generalstarwars333 on

          (to everyone)The negative five cookies was me trying to make a little joke. the story was awesome. Sorry if my previous comment was interpreted as an insult.

          Reply
    3. By Charles Simpson on

      @ Generalstarwars333 In writing any time you deviate from non standard English it is difficult to both write and read. The articles and exceptions are areas where most learning English make mistakes you will see the same in both Alexey and Mattheau’s English occasionally, and for a foreign language they do quite well. Very young children have similar problems they first intuitively learn the rules and apply them thus you might get ised for was etc.

      Another way is to invent a language grammar and vocabulary other than the first book Taylor has used very little Lemurain. See http://destroyermen.wikia.com/wiki/Lemurian_Glossary

      If you want a real challenge in writing try writing some Lemurian dialog.

      Reply
      1. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

        True, though there will be more “lemurian” in the upcoming book, as “new” lemurians are encountered. Generally, I try to limit the “Lemurian” in dialog to certain pronunciations and sentence structures for flavor and “authenticity.” Some speak English better than others, and that is reflected. Others revert to Lemurian pronunciation under stress. I honestly don’t know how well I have accomplished this, but I have made an effort. Yet English would be essential–even the Grik Hij understand it as the “scientific” tongue. You’ll also note that Lemurian characters who have been speaking English the longest often speak it better than the English as a first language characters. This is actually realistic as well. Most of the very best English speakers I know took it up as a second language. Of course there are always others who learn just enough to get by . . . poorly, and I know plenty of those. That actually describes my Spanish fairly well.

        Interestingly, one of the most brilliant things about Charles’s “letters home” is that they don’t reflect Lemurian pronunciation in spelling. The “double A” that appears in dialog would NOT necessarily appear in spelling–because as they learned to write, they would also learn to use a single ‘A’ despite how they speak. That said, some of the early maps use AA in place names. I defend this by saying many would have been drawn by humans, spelling place names phonetically, as they were told to them. And even those earlier maps made by Lemurians might have been done before careful teaching began. Make sense?

        Reply
        1. By Jeff Stuart on

          I love Charles’s lemurian letters home. They sound just like I felt in boot. I think Charles grasped the particular grammatical style and common spelling/pronunciation mistakes of the cats quite well. I believe listening to the audio book versions, read by William Dufris, has made the lemurian “patois” very enjoyable for me, where simply reading the books may not have had the same effect. Despite my marked preference for UK/British narrators, I’ve really enjoyed Dufris’ interpretation of the author’s written words. I think the characterizations are well done too, although Mr. Anderson may not agree. (I LMAO’d at several of Dennis Silva’s rants/comments/asides). Regardless, I still think Charles’s “Lemurian Letters Home” are a GREAT idea.

          Reply
          1. By Charles Simpson on

            Welcome aboard Jeff, and thank you. Just before the change to the new site we were discussing anti aircraft guns that might possibly be needed for the swarms of Grik smaller ‘ancient’ transports one of the ideas was either a Gatling or Hotchkiss gun perhaps motorized in the 30-50mm range. For drawings ect see:

            http://www.victorianshipmodels.com/antitorpedoboatguns/index.html

            For Victorian anti torpedo boat weapons if you have not found this source yet. What are your thoughts?

  30. By Charles Simpson on

    Fan Fic 4.5 Word document pages: The Trucker

    By Charles Simpson

    Young Chan Woo was Ge-taa his Dock worker father had gotten him this job as an apprentice driver. It was difficult understanding the Lemurian spoken by one Raachik from Maa-ni-la where the trucks were made for while. The Lemurain of the islanders was spiced with words from the Americaans his had words from the many diffrent cultures that had settled in the Republic.

    “Wind her up, Chan,” Raachik ordered continuing, “Remember to say ‘contact’ when you have finished the first turn. And wait till I answer ‘contact’ before you crank her.”

    Chan took the crank, inserted it into the slot, and turned the engine over one complete circuit of the crank. Stepped to the left of the hood and said “Contact.” At twelve the young Gentaa was stronger than most Lemurians and far stronger than a human.

    Raachik flicked the switch, and said “Contact” he returned to the crank and again cranked the engine it caught soon settling down to the smooth rumble. He removed the crank. He had been nervous on this crank he had been told that rarely a cylinder backfired turning the crank into a dangerous weapon for while the ratchet and pawl of the crank disengaged instantly from an engine turning the right way a back fire sent the crank into the cranker often breaking bones.

    Chan resumed his stool watching as Raachik depressed the clutch and shifted into first gear, and released the clutch while his other foot on the gas peddle added power. “What are we carrying this trip,” he asked?

    “Grub and small arms ammo.” Raachik smiled, “I caged a ham for the driver’s mess, I love ham sandwiches on the road.” Raachik went through the gears as he drove and talked. “I’ll let you drive back, if you do well I’ll let you drive the next load to the front do it right a few times and we’ll give you a truck of your own.”

    They stopped at the truck compound and Raachik took the ham he caged into the mess, returning with several paper wrapped ham sandwiches, Chan was growing to like ham sandwiches especially with the mustard spread from the Empire. When they pulled over for lunch he enjoyed his. Raachik said, “You drive the rest of the way.”

    Chan flicked the switch, “Contact,” he said. The truck back fired, Raachik was cussing Chan ran to him he was cradling his arm. He helped him mount the cab, returned to the crank and got the truck started. He dropped Raachik off a the Medical tent near the front, and then delivered the cargo, he refueled the truck, and picked up Raachik. On returning to the truck depot he reported the accident to the Lt.

    The Lieutenant said, “It’s your truck now I’ll assign you another student driver.” Chan was no longer a student he was a trucker.
    The Lt. brought Chow Wong another Gentaa who had been in the class behind Chan, they were best friends, but knew better than to show it before the Lt. After the unnecessary introductions the Lt. left and Chow sat saying, “How did you get to be a driver so fast?”

    Chan smiled, “A backfire broke one of his twin bones in the arm of my Lemurian instructor driver, remember this when you crank a truck.”

    Chow said, “No need to act all holy and give me sermons, Chan.”

    “I was scared to death, got the truck running and drove him to the medical tent, then delivered the load and helped to unloaded it, then refueled the truck for the drive back, reported to the Lt. and was told I was now a driver. That was the first time I drove a loaded truck, today he was going to let me drive a loaded truck the whole way. You’re taking your life in your hands riding with an inexperienced driver.” Chan grinning eviely winked, “Guess who gets to crank the engine, the student usually. But I’ll show you how on this first one.”

    He demonstrated the process and drove to the dock; he caged a couple of hams and a bottle of mustard and stopped by the truck depot’s mess, got sandwiches for the trip, and a jug of cold Monkey Joe. The Gentaa liked the taste and the alertness it provided unlike the Lemurian drivers. At the front a battle had ended and their truck returned with a load of the wounded. At the army camp after unloading the wounded they were pressed into driving a truck load of replacements back to the front, and they were glad for the monkey joe. They stayed the night as the trucks did not have lights the Grik Zeps paid a visit that night. In the morning he caged some sandwiches and more joe from the mess. On the trip back he took another load of wounded.

    Chow asked, “What are you planning to do when the war is over?”

    “Buy a truck we have good roads in the Republic. So I’ll write the company and ask how much a truck costs, and save most of my pay to buy one.”

    “You know most of the freighters are Lemurian, will they let us in?”

    Chan smiled, “A wagon would take ten days to take a load to the front and back, while a truck does it in one. That means we take ten times the loads of a teamster and his wagon.”

    “But the gass-oline in more expensive than animal fodder for ten days, and who sells it here in the Republic?”

    That stumped Chan, he thought it over, We will need fueling stations along the road, each with a mechanic and a tow truck. “A transportation company with fueling stations along the roads into the interior from the port is what we need. You know we might see who else might be interested in the idea get more drivers and some mechanics to make a freighting company. You interested Chow?” Chow nodded his assent.
    At the depot fueling station the Lt. gave them the rest of the day off nor were they the only drivers resting from the double trip.

    At lunch Chow mentioned the idea to other Gentaa student drivers several saying the wanted in, saying variations of, “It’ll beat humping freight on the docks.” Most of the others thought the Idea of a Gentaa trucking company was a good, but wanted no part of a trucking company thinking of buying their own truck as an independent driver. The others agreed to join Chan’s company as investors and workers.

    Chan got the company writer to write the letter to the company, and sent it back with a freighter bound for Maa-ni-la for more trucks. The writer, one Maa-ra-kaa, wanted in too. He was a Lemurian from Baalkpan, but they would need clerks too. He proved his worth by suggesting a stock company each investor putting up $100 for each share, deposited in a local bank, but requiring two signatures to withdraw funds his and another Gentaa investor. Now while a Republic Denarius and an Americaan silver dollar contained the same ounce of silver a one ounce gold coin the of the republic, the one ounce Aruius, was worth thirty Denarii while the American $20 one ounce coin was twenty ounces of silver. The sly Maa-ra-kaa explained, “We take out our money here in gold, an Arius is worth thirty Denarii, and as the Denarii is traded evenly with the Dollar you get $150 back for each five $20 gold pieces. So we’ll game the system until the bankers catch on. So you guys get you shares as soon as possible, and take your money from the paymaster in gold.” As the Gentaa took the American Gold coins to thee various banks to get silver it took the bankers a long time to catch on, the Gentaa were insular, and did not blab to others. Nor did they use a Gentaa Bank. Pulling one over on the humans and Lemurians of the republic suited them just fine. They managed to triple their investment capital buy five damaged trucks and the parts to fix them, and the land for their main terminal and two fueling stops in the time it took before the Bankers figured out the scam.

    The clerk bribed a Lemurian sailor from Maa-ni-la to be a letter carrier with five bottles of Raa-nich a brandy made from the local jaa-na berries, and promised five more bottles when he brought an answer back, as with all company clerks trained by the Americaans he knew how to trade for favors. He had bought six cases of the brandy for a twenty dollar gold piece, and Chan had agreed that trading stock would be $20 of his first share. The clerk also told the Lt of the plan and how he had joined it.

    Lieutenant Tachik was also from Maa-ni-la and had been one of the original workers at the truck works, but now the American Navy Clan equivalent of a Captain of Marines. “You know we may be able to help each other out, I’m authorized to hire civilian workers and recruit volunteer helpers who wish to learn skills. If the Gentaa drivers have younger brothers or sisters or cozens who wish to be truck drivers they can train them with my permission also mechanics and fuel depot workers. At the factory I was the one who learned to use the English wheel to make the sheet steel parts of the prototype truck, and helped make the molds for the cast iron stamps that make the parts at the factory. We could use a body worker on a wheel to make replacements for damaged body panels on our trucks, and for the company later such an individual would be useful to the company saving on buying panels and getting the repair done sooner. We could also use a good blacksmith to repair parts and make forgings to be machined into parts. Talk to your friends and I’ll give them first notice of any trucks we declare too damaged to repair and they can get their first company trucks cheap.” Tachik had a buddy who commanded the truck company with second fleet he would write him the idea to start a private company in the Alliance controlled areas of the Holy Dominion. “I got some investment money I’d like to put into the company too and when the war is over we will all need a job.” He also wrote out a list of spare parts that the Veteran Truck Company (VTC) would need to keep their trucks on the road.

    As happened Chow’s elder brother was a tinker experienced repairing pots and pans and was soon being taught to use the English wheel by the Lt. hired as civilian labor by the American Navy Clan’s truck company (ANCTC) on the African front. Chan’s uncle a blacksmith at the ship yard quit and went to work for the ANCTC’s main depot. Several young Gentaa volunteered to learn truck mechanic, fuel depot, wrecking skills, and truck driving skills some were hired by the ANCTC the others began building the infrastructure of the Veteran Truck Company (VTC).

    Chow now had a truck of his own a driver of the ANCTC both he and Chan had younger siblings learning truck driving with them as volunteers later becoming civilian workers of ANCTC. As the front moved north eventually the small Grik port of Too Cold was taken and Alliance shipping changed the new port was improved and a new depot was made there to supply the front. Traffic between Too Cold and Songze actually increaced as it allowed ships to keep out of the storms. Eventually a railroad would take a lot of this traffic especially of bulk commodities, but a lot of goods went by truck to destinations through out the Republic.

    Within two months the first Veteran Truck Company (VTC) trucks were hauling cargos competing with the wagon owners and the first money began to come into the company slowly the VTC began to make mile stones, actually showing a profit by the end of it’s first year of operation. The shareholders voted to plow the profits into the growth into the company. It continued to grow and expand following the excellent roads of the Republic. While there were a few independent truckers only the VTC had the infrastructure for long hauls.

    This was how I founded the Veteran Truck Company,

    President Chan Woo Veteran Truck Company

    Reply
    1. By Charles Simpson on

      Oops half way down page 4 is 3.5 pages of text.

      Reply
  31. By Charles Simpson on

    Trial two an a half pages of MS word and corrected Fan fic:

    The Trucker

    By Charles Simpson

    Young Chan Woo was Ge-taa his Dock worker father had gotten him this job as an apprentice driver. It was difficult understanding the Lemurian spoken by one Raachik from Maa-ni-la where the trucks were made for while. The Lemurain of the islanders was spiced with words from the Americaans his had words from the many diffrent cultures that had settled in the Republic.

    “Wind her up, Chan,” Raachik ordered continuing, “Remember to say ‘contact’ when you have finished the first turn. And wait till I answer contact before you crank her.”

    Chan took the crank, inserted it into the slot, and turned the engine over one complete circuit of the crank. Stepped to the left of the hood and said “Contact.” At twelve the young Gentaa was stronger than most Lemurians and far stronger than a human.

    Raachik flicked the switch, and said “Contact” he returned to the crank and again cranked the engine it caught soon settling down to the smooth rumble. He removed the crank. He had been nervous on this crank rarely a cylinder backfired turning the crank into a dangerous weapon for while the ratchet and pawl of the crank disengaged instantly from an engine turning the right way a back fire sent the crank into the cranker often breaking bones.

    Chan resumed his stool watching as Raachik depressed the clutch and shifted into first gear, and released the clutch while his other foot on the gas peddle added power. “What are we carrying this trip,” he asked?

    “Grub and small arms ammo.” Raachik smiled, “I caged a ham for the driver’s mess, I love ham sandwiches on the road.” Raachik went through the gears as he drove and talked. “I’ll let you drive back, if you do well I’ll let you drive the next load to the front do it right a few times and we’ll give you a truck of your own.”

    They stopped at the truck compound and Raachik took the ham he caged into the mess, returning with several paper wrapped ham sandwiches, Chan was growing to like ham sandwiches especially with the mustard spread from the Empire. When they pulled over for lunch he enjoyed his. Raachik said, “You drive the rest of the way.”

    Chan flicked the switch, “Contact,” he said. The truck back fired, Raachik was cussing Chan ran to him he was cradling his arm. He helped him mount the cab, returned to the crank and got the truck started. He dropped Raachik off a the Medical tent near the front, and then delivered the cargo, he refueled the truck, and picked up Raachik. On returning to the truck depot he reported the accident to the Lt.

    The Lieutenant said, “It’s your truck now I’ll assign you another student driver.” Chan was no longer a student he was a trucker.
    The Lt. brought Chow Wong another Gentaa who had been in the class behind Chan, they were best friends, but knew better than to show it before the Lt. After the unnecessary introductions the Lt. left and Chow sat saying, “How did you get to be a driver so fast?”

    Chan smiled, “A backfire broke one of his twin bones in the arm of my Lemurian instructor driver, remember this when you crank a truck.”

    Chow said, “No need to act all holy and give me sermons, Chan.”

    “I was scared to death, got the truck running and drove him to the medical tent, then delivered the load and helped to unloaded it, then refueled the truck for the drive back, reported to the Lt. and was told I was now a driver. That was the first time I drove a loaded truck, today he was going to let me drive a loaded truck the whole way. You’re taking your life in your hands riding with an inexperienced driver.” Chan grinning eviely winked, “Guess who gets to crank the engine, the student usually. But I’ll show you how on this first one.”

    He demonstrated the process and drove to the dock; he caged a couple of hams and a bottle of mustard and stopped by the truck depot’s mess, got sandwiches for the trip, and a jug of cold Monkey Joe. The Gentaa liked the taste and the alertness it provided unlike the Lemurian drivers. At the front a battle had ended and their truck returned with a load of the wounded. At the army camp after unloading the wounded they were pressed into driving a truck load of replacements back to the front, and they were glad for the monkey joe. They stayed the night as the trucks did not have lights the Grik Zeps paid a visit that night. In the morning he caged some sandwiches and more joe from the mess. On the trip back he took another load of wounded.

    Chow asked, “What are you planning to do when the war is over?”

    “Buy a truck we have good roads in the Republic. So I’ll write the company and ask how much a truck costs, and save most of my pay to buy one.”

    “You know most of the freighters are Lemurian, will they let us in?”

    Chan smiled, “A wagon would take ten days to take a load to the front and back, while a truck does it in one. That means we take ten times the loads of a teamster and his wagon.”

    “But the gass-oline in more expensive than animal fodder for ten days, and who sells it here in the Republic?”

    That stumped Chan, he thought it over, We will need fueling stations along the road, each with a mechanic and a tow truck. “A transportation company with fueling stations along the roads into the interior from the port is what we need. You know we might see who else might be interested in the idea get more drivers and some mechanics to make a freighting company. You interested Chow?” Chow nodded his assent.
    At the depot fueling station the Lt. gave them the rest of the day off nor were they the only drivers resting from the double trip.

    At lunch Chow mentioned the idea to other Gentaa student drivers several saying the wanted in, saying variations of, “It’ll beat humping freight on the docks.” Most of the others thought the Idea of a Gentaa trucking company was a good, but wanted no part of a trucking company thinking of buying their own truck as an independent driver. The others agreed to join Chan’s company as investors and workers.

    Chan got the company writer to write the letter to the company, and sent it back with a freighter bound for Maa-ni-la for more trucks. The writer, one Maa-ra-kaa, wanted in too. He was a Lemurian from Baalkpan, but they would need clerks too. He proved his worth by suggesting a stock company each investor putting up $100 for each share, deposited in a local bank, but requiring two signatures to withdraw funds his and another Gentaa investor.

    The clerk bribed the Lemurian sailor from Maa-ni-la to be a letter carrier with five bottles of Raa-nich a brandy made from the local jaa-na berries, and promised five more bottles when he brought an answer back. As with all company clerks trained by the Americaans he knew how to trade for favors.

    Reply
      1. By Charles Simpson on

        Thanks I’m going to post the whole corrected thing when I get to five pages to see what the limit is. Here’s a little taste:

        Chan got the company writer to write the letter to the company, and sent it back with a freighter bound for Maa-ni-la for more trucks. The writer, one Maa-ra-kaa, wanted in too. He was a Lemurian from Baalkpan, but they would need clerks too. He proved his worth by suggesting a stock company each investor putting up $100 for each share, deposited in a local bank, but requiring two signatures to withdraw funds his and another Gentaa investor. Now while a Republic Denarius and an Americaan silver dollar contained the same ounce of silver a one ounce gold coin the of the republic, the one ounce Aruius, was worth thirty Denarii while the American $20 one ounce coil was twenty ounces of silver. The sly Maa-ra-kaa explained, “We take out our money here in gold, an Arius is worth thirty Denarii, and as the Denarii is traded evenly with the Dollar you get $150 back for each five $20 gold pieces. So we’ll game the system until the bankers catch on. So you guys get you shares as soon as possible, and take your money from the paymaster in gold.” As the Gentaa took the American Gold coins to thee barious banks to get silver it took the bankers a long time to catch on, the Gentaa were insular and did not blab to others. Nor did they use a Gentaa Bank. Pulling one over on the humans and Lemurians of the republic suited them just fine. They managed to triple their investment capital in the time it took before the Bankers figured out the scam.

        Most American WW 2 movies have at least one hustler character :) so an homage. 😉

        Reply
    1. By Charles Simpson on

      Now since I don’t know how Taylor will name the Gentaa I took the idea they would have Chinese names as former Chinese slaves from my Gentaa ethnography. Their names reinforcing the fiction the Gentaa were the result of Chinese males mating with Lemurian females.

      I posted the snippet above uncorrected I have to read over stories several times to edit the language. so I’ll post the first correction to the snippet.

      Chan got the company writer to write the letter to the company, and sent it back with a freighter bound for Maa-ni-la for more trucks. The writer, one Maa-ra-kaa, wanted in too. He was a Lemurian from Baalkpan, but they would need clerks too. He proved his worth by suggesting a stock company each investor putting up $100 for each share, deposited in a local bank, but requiring two signatures to withdraw funds his and another Gentaa investor. Now while a Republic Denarius and an Americaan silver dollar contained the same ounce of silver a one ounce gold coin the of the republic, the one ounce Aruius, was worth thirty Denarii while the American $20 one ounce coin was twenty ounces of silver. The sly Maa-ra-kaa explained, “We take out our money here in gold, an Arius is worth thirty Denarii, and as the Denarii is traded evenly with the Dollar you get $150 back for each five $20 gold pieces. So we’ll game the system until the bankers catch on. So you guys get you shares as soon as possible, and take your money from the paymaster in gold.” As the Gentaa took the American Gold coins to thee various banks to get silver it took the bankers a long time to catch on, the Gentaa were insular, and did not blab to others. Nor did they use a Gentaa Bank. Pulling one over on the humans and Lemurians of the republic suited them just fine. They managed to triple their investment capital buy five damaged trucks and the parts to fix them, and the land for their main terminal and two fueling stops in the time it took before the Bankers figured out the scam.

      And General to show you how to write a story I plan on addig a Gentaa tinker and black smith who repair the body work and frames of the wrecked trucks they buy, eventually the Lt. will buy into the comapny and send them to Maa-ni-la to be factory trained, he being a former worker and share holder in the company.

      Reply
      1. By Generalstarwars333 on

        You mean me? I can already write a story. I just can’t do character interactions, which is why the only real conversation in one of my stories was comepletely awkward looking. Probably mirroring how I kind of am in real life.

        Reply
        1. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

          You might also try reading what you write out loud. I do that myself. Awkward phrasing usually jumps right out at you. My wife hates it when I say “let me read you this paragraph.” I’ll read a few lines and say “oops, just a second–” and I fix what I found. Read a few more words and “aggh! Hold on!” And so on. And the thing is, EVERY TIME you read it, you’ll see things you want to change. But Charles is right. The best way to learn to write talking–is talk a lot. Now, that can get weird when you’re writing people who don’t talk “naturally,” and this can be space aliens, or even 19th Century . . .pick your language. The ways people talk change dramatically over time. Words are added or go out of use, and some people use lots of contractions, others don’t. It can get frustrating. The answer to that? Mine is to read a lot, and if the phrasing is unusual, and I want to learn it, read it out loud as well.
          Some people complain that not enough people in my stories talk like Jimmy Cagney–because they’ve gotten their idea of “Americanisms” in the 30’s and 40’s from movies. Well, SOME people did talk that way, and I toss in a little now and then, but most people really didn’t. It was a Hollywood construct to a large extent. To the extent it wasn’t, I’m still writing for a 21st century audience and too much of that stuff would be . . . too much. I also don’t use the “F” word–every other word, which you KNOW many people did. I bet that was THE most common word in the firerooms, for example. Does that mean I should use it? No. I’m writing an adventure story, not a treatise on fireroom banter, and it’s a story that, despite the REPRESENTATIVE PG-13 language, and occasionally R-rated violence, I want young adults to be able to enjoy as well–FOR the story, not for the distracting “OOOH He said THAT!” Make sense? As I’ve written before, I’ve heard some pretty fluent cussing, but cussing doesn’t tell a story. I’ve occasionally stopped watching movies with too much cussing, not because I’m a prude, but because the cussing SWAMPED the story. It became like: Huh. This is a movie about cussing. I’ve heard cussing. I’ll watch something else.
          Now, I can see having a particular character with a cussing problem, who stands out because of it. Some of my characters (besides Petey) are kind of like that. But others don’t cuss at all, or when they do it illustrates stress or something that MOVED them to uncharacteristic behavior.
          Anyway, ultimately, Charles is right in another way. Not enough talking going on these days, and too many people who DO talk are just spewing words–to people who, since they don’t talk, assume that’s the way people who talk . . . talk. Ha! Looking back over that, I’m glad I wasn’t talking! :) You should also guard against using the same word over and over, unless you’re being deliberately silly, like I was :)

          Reply
          1. By Charles Simpson on

            I agree with Taylor too much spice in soup ruins it and too much character can make dialog stilted. Write it how you would say it. with an occasional dash of salt, “Use guys” from a New Yorker or a “Y’all” from a southerner for the plural you. or go “park the ca” from a Bostonian. Similarly watch using too much nautical while an occasional “Avast Thar” might be good most people would say Stop or stop it. How much is too much? Reread your words sound too strange to you, too much spice :)

      2. By Charles Simpson on

        The best advice of dialog I can give is to put yourself in character as the character, perhaps modeling it on a movie, cartoon etc. One of the things I think modern kids miss out on is the imaginative play we engaged in, role playing with our pears in play now you have video games and texting so don’t get ias much practice interacting verbally as those of us born in the stone age did, yep I remember General Eisenhower as president. You may consider taking Drama in highschool to learn acting and how to get in character, like chicken soup, “It couldn’t hoirt,” sorry for the poor atemt at a Jewish grandmother’s accent :)

        Reply
        1. By Generalstarwars333 on

          I’ve done plenty of roleplaying though. I had my own empire during recess in third grade(it was mostly just a military, but they could march in step and in formation and do cavalrycharges) and then it fell. Then in fifth grade I had a much better one with a constitution and an economy and stuff and no standing military but a militia. And It was cool. But I think another part of my problem with dialogue is that I’m just naturally kind of socially awkward and I prefer a big battle to character interactions. I think you probably have good points though.

          Reply
          1. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

            Believe me, General, EVERYBODY is “socially awkward” until they get out in the world and have to interact with real people, face to face. This is not new, even if the problem is somewhat aggravated by the prevalence of “social media.” Such an ironic term for something so destructive to genuine person to person interactions! I used to think “well, at least people are learning to write letters again,” but they’re not. They’re not even learning to spell whole words, because spell-check does it for them. And when I see two people, sitting side by side, texting each other instead of talking, I sometimes think civilization is doomed.
            At the same time, like I said, everybody starts out “socially awkward.” I’ve eliminated “stage fright” from my life, but probably remain a bit awkward because I tend to blurt out the first thing that comes to mind. Open mouth, insert foot. I imagine I can be somewhat annoying. But when I was a kid, growing up in the country, rarely socializing with anyone but the few pals I ran around with, hunting and fishing, you probably never saw anyone who felt more awkward trying to carry on a conversation with strangers. I kicked it with “life experience,” by doing lots of things that put me in contact with a wide variety of people–and becoming a voracious learner. Don’t worry, all things grow easier with use. You are not socially awkward HERE, where you hold your own in conversations with a bunch of relatively learned–again relative–geezers. And though this is much like social media in a sense, you can take confidence from your experience here and apply it to life. Make sense?

          2. By Clifton Sutherland on

            Huh, General, for the longest time I had an entire nation that I was carrying around my head. I basically created an entire fictional world and had a huge world war and all sorts of shenanigans between the redoubtable Empire of Bleoshia and the scheming Porto-Malians. But all of my creative bits went into creating a history or political situation, and not towards certain characters. And I can definitely agree that writing realistic dialogue can be VERY challenging- especially when the characters you are writing about are not in your age group, or come from a different culture or time. I’d suggest reading some fiction with lots of complex characters (There is this great series called Destroyermen you might like..) and listening to how people talk in regular conversations. Remember, its not just what your characters say, its how they say it. You can add a lot more authenticity if you don’t just use “he said” everytime someone opens their mouth.

            And Taylor is absolutely right- I was horrendously awkward until I went out and did some things with my life- Football, especially. The more you are around people, the easier they are to talk to.

          3. By Generalstarwars333 on

            Yes sir. Thank you for the advice.(only thing I could think of that makes sense and doesn’t seem off topic or look like I’ve missed a large part of the conversation or something)

  32. By Charles Simpson on

    A short Fan Fic:

    The Trucker

    By Charles Simpson

    Young Chan Woo was Ge-taa his Dock worker father had gotten him this job as an apprentice driver. It was difficult the Lemurian one Raachik from Maa-ni-la where the trucks were made for while. The Lemurain of the islanders was spiced with words from the Americaans his had words from the many diffrent cultures that had settled in the Republic.

    “Wind her up, Chan,” Raachik ordered continuing, “Remember to say contact when you have finished the first turn. And wait till I answer contact before you crank her.”

    Chan took the crank, inserted it into the slot, and turned the engine over one complete circuit of the crank. Stepped to the left of the hood and said “Contact.” At twelve the young Gentaa was stronger than most Lemurians and far stronger than a human.

    Raachik flicked the switch, and said “Contact” he returned to the crank and again cranked the engine it caught soon settling down to the smooth rumble. He removed the crank. He had been nervous on this crank rarely a cylinder backfired turning the crank into a dangerous weapon for while the ratchet and pawl of the crank disengaged instantly from an engine turning the right way a back fire sent the crank into the cranker often breaking bones.

    Chan resumed his stool watching as Raachik depressed the clutch and shifted into first gear, and released the clutch while his other foot on the gas peddle added power. “What are we carrying this trip,” he asked?

    “Grub and small arms ammo.” Raachik smiled, “I caged a ham for the driver’s mess, I love ham sandwiches on the road.” Raachik went through the gears as he drove and talked. “I’ll let you drive back, if you do well I’ll let you drive the next load to the front do it right a few times and we’ll give you a truck of your own.”

    They stopped at the truck compound and Raachik took the ham he caged into the mess, returning with several paper wrapped ham sandwiches, Chan was growing to like ham sandwiches especially with the mustard spread from the Empire. When they pulled over for lunch he enjoyed his. Raachik said, “You drive the rest of the way.”

    Chan flicked the switch, “Contact,” he said. The truck back fired, Raachik was cussing Chan ran to him he was cradling his arm. He helped him mount the cab, returned to the crank and got the truck started. He dropped Raachik off a the Medical tent near the front, and then delivered the cargo, he refueled the truck, and picked up Raachik. On returning to the truck depot he reported the accident to the Lt.

    The Lieutenant said, “It’s your truck now I’ll assign you another student driver.” Chan was no longer a student he was a trucker.

    Reply
    1. By Charles Simpson on

      Oops first paragraph needs work:

      “Young Chan Woo was Ge-taa his Dock worker father had gotten him this job as an apprentice driver. It was difficult understanding the Lemurian spoken by one Raachik from Maa-ni-la where the trucks were made for while. The Lemurain of the islanders was spiced with words from the Americaans his had words from the many diffrent cultures that had settled in the Republic.” Started on page 2 but it’s tea time and church parade after so it will be a while.

      Reply
    2. By Charles Simpson on

      The Lt. brought Chow Wong another Gentaa who had been in the class behind Chan, they were best friends, but knew better than to show it before the Lt. After the unnecessary introductions the Lt. left and Chow sat saying, “How did you get to be a driver so fast?”

      Chan smiled, “A backfire broke one of his twin bones in his arm, remember this when you crank a truck.”

      Chow said, “No need to act all holy and give me sermons, Chan.”

      “I was scared to death, got the truck running and drove him to the medical tent, then delivered the load and helped to unloaded it, then refueled the truck for the drive back, reported to the Lt. and was told I was now a driver. That was the first time I drove a loaded truck, today he was going to let me drive a loaded truck the whole way. You’re taking your life in your hands riding with an inexperienced driver.” Chan grinned an evil grin, and winked. “Guess who gets to crank the engine, the student usually. But I’ll show you how on this first one.”

      He demonstrated the process and drove to the dock; he caged a couple of hams and a bottle of mustard and stopped by the truck depot’s mess, got sandwiches for the trip, and a jug of cold Monkey Joe. The Gentaa liked the taste and the alertness it provided unlike the Lemurian drivers. At the front a battle had ended and their truck returned with a load of the wounded. At the army camp after unloading the wounded they were pressed into driving a truck load of replacements back to the front, and they were glad for the monkey joe. They stayed the night as the trucks did not have lights the Grik Zeps paid a visit that night. In the morning he caged some sandwiches and more joe from the mess. On the trip back he took another load of wounded.

      Chow asked, “What are you planning to do when the war is over?”

      “Buy a truck we have good roads in the Republic. So I’ll write the company and ask how much a truck costs, and save most of my pay to buy one.”

      “You know most of the freighters are Lemurian, will they let us in?”

      Chan smiled, “A wagon would ten days to take a load to the front and back, while a truck does it in one. That means we take ten times the loads of a teamster.”

      “But the gass-oline in more expensive than animal fodder for ten days, and who sells it in the Republic?”

      That stumped Chan, he thought it over, We will need fueling stations along the road, each with a mechanic and a tow truck. “A transportation company with fueling stations along the roads into the interior from the port is what we need. You know we might see who else might be interested in the idea get more drivers and some mechanics to make a freighting company. You interested Chow?” Chow nodded his assent.
      At the depot fueling station the Lt. gave them the rest of the day off nor were they the only drivers resting from the double trip.

      At lunch Chow mentioned the idea to other Gentaa student drivers several saying the wanted in, saying variations of, “It’ll beat humping freight on the docks.” Most of the others thought the Idea of a Gentaa trucking company was a good, but wanted no part of a trucking company thinking of buying their own truck as an independent driver. The others agreed to join Chan’s company as investors and workers.

      Chan got the company writer to write the letter to the company, and sent it back with a freighter bound for Maa-ni-la for more trucks. The writer, one Maa-ra-kaa, wanted in too. He was a Lemurian from Baalkpan, but they would need clerks too. He proved his worth by suggesting a stock company each investor putting up $100 for each share, deposited in a local bank, but requiring two signatures to withdraw funds his and another investor.

      He bribed the Lemurian sailor from Maa-ni-la to be a letter carrier with five bottles of Raa-nich a brandy made from the jaa-na berries, and promised five more bottles when he brought an answer back.

      Reply
  33. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

    As I said, I will soon post some of Courtney’s “monologues.” The last, in Straits of Hell had to do with the nature of “Mercy.” I’m curious about your views. The next, appearing in Blood in the Water, involves the nature of “Theories.” If I have a chance, I may pre-post that one as well. Anyway, a couple things to talk about!

    Reply
    1. By Charles Simpson on

      In mercy he discusses the Lemurians practicing mercy only because their allies did, and we did due to the English culture common to himself, the Empire, and the Americans. This will allow him to explain the barbaric behavior on native Lemurians on Madagascaar.

      As to theories I’m sure he will extol the scientific method and logic, although he appears to use the Thesis vs. Antithesis of Marxist cultural thought. Thus I forsee cultural evolution in the future.

      I now leave the necromancy, and wash my hands of the chicken innards.

      Reply
      1. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

        Uh . . . actually, not much Marxism in Courtney, cultural thought or otherwise. Though his theories tend more toward leaping at a “synthesis” of similarity, not opposites. Not exactly what his monologue is about, though.

        Reply
        1. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

          And necromancy? Eewww! If you’re washing your hands of chicken innards, I’d have thought you were trying to predict the weather! (Sorry, that takes chicken BONES!)

          Reply
    2. By Alexey Shiro on

      Well… the concept of mercy was mentioned several times in series. The first major application was about swamp lizards; as I recall, they considered mercy “ancient, almost-forgotten” and were really baffled to met it from other specie.

      The Griks seems unable to grasp the concept of mercy, but it is cultural, not biological element, formed by the abnormality of their society. So… is it possible, that the concept of mercy would be used to reform the Grik empire into something less dangerous to live nearby?

      Reply
    3. By Charles Simpson on

      Well Dr. Alexey brings forth a very cogent point with the Swamp Lizards I forgot, an ancient hero of their civilization who showed them mercy giving them the swamp where Santa Catalina was discovered. Should comunication between them be established one wonders if they might tell of the capture of the Lemurians by the League? Not likely they are “the type of friends who rarely visit each other.”

      Another example of Mercy was shown in I’joorka saved Tony Scott from the Super Lizard. There is some evidence this was done due to the Khonashi being a mixed reptilian-human tribe.

      Reply
      1. By Charles Simpson on

        OOPS! “Another example of Mercy was shown {when} I’joorka …” sorry for the bad English.

        This multi species tribe also gives hope that the Grik may change into something better when fellow hunters become citizens. Look at the effect of Orochi Niwa on General Halik.

        Reply
        1. By Alexey Shiro on

          Well, as I mentioned before – Grik’s aren’t Daleks. They are so “inhuman” (if we could use this therm to nonhuman specie) mostly because of their culture – which is very old, and, actually, very early. As Taylor confirmed, before the Alliance war, they simply did not meet any problem that they could not solve just by numbers – nothing that may force their culture to change. And let’s not forget; their culture may be cruel by human standards, but it is VERY effective.

          Reply
        2. By Charles Simpson on

          Well I don’t think our author will have the Grik win, just that the alliance will win a very hard fought war. I think the Grik civilization will survive but changed, looking at fresh chicken innards, perhaps even joining the Grand alliance, thus precluding the League of Tripoli from overt war with the alliance..

          Reply
          1. By Alexey Shiro on

            Must admit, that for my opinion “all would join the Alliance” isn’t very interesting solution… For my opinion, the Grik empire must remain the Grik empire – changed, less agressive (maybe even isolationistic, if they decide that “expansion suck, population control rule”), but still not very friendly and – ny opinion – non-affilated. Because generally the Grik Empire as ally is too powerfull advantage to any side.

          2. By Alexey Shiro on

            //thus precluding the League of Tripoli from overt war with the alliance..//

            My IMHO – more likely the cold/warm war scenario, with League and Alliance hostile to each other and Grik Empire as a neutral side, that both the League and Alliance are trying to convert on their side. A lot of good politic, diplomacy and backstabbing could be…)

          3. By Justin on

            //A lot of good politic, diplomacy and backstabbing could be…//

            Right, but then the narrative ends up more like an Ian Fleming story than an Eric Flint one. A North Grikia/South Grikia split sounds like a better catalyst.

          4. By Clifton Sutherland on

            I think there will be some sort of uneasy coexsistence with a reformed Grik faction, while the rest of the Empire devolves into inter-regent struggles. I bet the Alliance and the League will be engaged in proxy wars all over, whether supporting various grik factions, or perhaps propping up or attempting to topple forces in the Americas…

      2. By Matthieu on

        I could read a sci-fi book where one of the species met the problem: they had to let their yound in a very hostile environement en most of them were killed. A long time ago they tried to change that and set up new laws to protect thm. Twenty years later they discovered that thone new adults were missing a significant element: they didn’t know what was fear, danger… leading to overly aggressive reactions with other spacefaring species almost leading them to extinction.

        You can imagine the same problem with griks: mercy may have a biological explanation. By changing the way they react they may create something really nasty and it can lead them to destruction.

        Reply
    4. By Joe Thorsky on

      Taylor:

      A possible great and relevant and inspirational forward or introduction that establishes the broad parameters and outside boundaries of the dialogues and debates to come; and
      which deserves to be be included into Courtney’s collective work; his monographs,observations, postulations and theories is the following passage and remarks from the speech
      “The Dignity and Importance of History” that was given before The Historical Society of New York by Daniel Webster on February 23, 1852.

      “Well written history must always be the result of genius and taste, as well as of research and study. It stands next topic poetry, among the productions of the human mind. If it requires less of invention than that, it is not behind it in dignity and importance. The province of the epic is the poetical narrative of real or supposed events, and the representation of real, or at least natural, characters;
      and history, in its noblest examples, is an account of occurrences in which great events are commemorated, and distinguished men appear as agents and actors. Epic poetry and the drama are but narratives, the former partly and the latter wholly, in the form of a dialogue, but their characters and personages are usually, in part at least, the creations of the imagination.”
      Daniel Webster- The Dignity and Importance of History February 1852

      Kinda sez it all don’t it!

      Reply
  34. By Joe Thorsky on

    Terribly sorry about my last incomplete posting Everyone!
    My Computer suddenly crashed (possibly gremlin related)
    The film I was actually referring to was the 1965
    Sands of the Kalahari
    Will try to do better next time!

    Reply
    1. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

      That’s okay Joe. You apologize after all the computer issues I’ve had lately? Ha! I’m just waiting for the one I’m writing my next book on to fail. I’ve already rubbed all the letters off the keys. What’s with that, anyway? I’ve only had that problem with the last couple of computers I’ve had. Cruddy key paint, on top of everything.

      Reply
        1. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

          I wish! I don’t get NEAT that much per book!

          And actually, since I write all my books on laptops . . . the croaked keyboard is not exactly a cheap fix. And one of the reasons I rub the characters off might be because I hit them fairly hard. But that’s what they’re for, right? Getting poked? Strangely, occasionally, there are even keys that no longer desire to do their duty at all! Mutiny cannot be tolerated and tends to make me angry enough to shoot the computer. . . This can be amazingly satisfying, but always remember to remove or copy the hard drive FIRST.

          I will check out the keyboard stickers again. The first ones I used didn’t last a day.

          Reply
          1. By Charles Simpson on

            Why do I have this vision of you in a cowboy hat shooting the computer Ah’la a WW 2 Willy and Joe cartoon, the GI shooting his jeep. Joe Thorsky would love it.

          2. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

            Well Charles . . . That’s a pretty accurate mental image. I have shot any number of mutinous appliances. In fact, all my buddies and I usually save computers, TVs–any number of examples of modern tech–for execution by musket volleys on the 4th of July. The muskets are appropriate for the day, and the celebration of old tech (and ideas, to a degree) triumphing over new adds a tasty morsel of irony to the proceedings.

          3. By donald johnson on

            Even a laptop can take an external Keyboard. I use them with all my laptops except when I am at starbucks or similar places. I have never worn the keys off my laptop but I have on the external keyboards. The other temp fix is to put a clear tape over the keys on a new laptop so it takes longer to buff down to the paint

      1. By Joe Thorsky on

        Taylor
        Getting somewhat used to, and becoming ever more accustomed and comfortable to all these new-fangled and so-called modern technological wonders and marvels of human ingenuity, creativity and invention can be a very confounding and troubling event that is both painful
        and extremely confusing. Coming to acceptable terms, making all the necessary adjustments and compensations and giving all of the proscribed and ritualistic payments and prayers for an accommodation and exception does little to make the experience any more palatable, pleasant, or enjoyable/helpful. Just navigating and steering through all of the interposing and interdicting technological contraptions and barriers that act as real time buffers and filters to one’s ability/capacity/capability to communicate is the enigma (enema?) of our so called modern time. Sometimes it’s far better to break apart than to break-in and succumb to the technology (An acquired view culminated from years of endless exasperations and frustrations to devices that do not, and cannot work; and witch? will not operate according to any specs, misplaced hopes, fervent fantasies or wishful thinking.)
        Does anybody have a spare “Nine Pound Hammer”?

        Reply
  35. By Joe Thorsky on

    Taylor-Guys

    “Why, they don’t even understand their own colossi any longer. The machines work from generation to generation automatically, and the caretakers are a hereditary
    class who would be helpless if a single D-Tube in all that vast structure burnt out.”
    Isaac Asimov-Foundation

    In terms of Galatic time; species evolution is Relative and becomes a mere afterthought in the grand scheme of things.
    As to the lengths any species will go to protect itself
    and survive can be observed, seen-felt with our own preconceived unchecked (and likely wrongheaded) beliefs
    and philosophies.
    The best movie representation and example of this is demonstrated and can be found in the movie
    Sands of the Kilimanjaro.

    Reply
    1. By Charles Simpson on

      Generally speaking physical evolution is several orders of magnitude slower than cultural evolution. Therefore we are more likely to see cultural differences among few species. Both physical and cultural evolution is tested by survival and climate change changes the environment, and thus conditions of survival.

      The Pass of fire allows tropical species of fish to be in all oceans, thus there are likely flashies in the Atlantic thus no enjoying tropical swimming for Fred and Kari :(

      Reply
      1. By Alexey Shiro on

        Well… There may be endemic factor that did not allow flashies to be common in Atlantic)

        Reply
        1. By donald johnson on

          Also you may not have flashies living in cold water. I havent read any mention of them in the California or for that matter the Hawaiian waters so deep water may be a block

          Reply
          1. By Alexey Shiro on

            Possibly, yes. With their appetite, they clearly need a lot of prey to sustain themselves.

          2. By Charles Simpson on

            “Flashy like fish” tear up Grik birds that Walker shot down in California waters. and Fred Reynolds worries about flashies during his rescue in Straits of Hell.

  36. By JoeThorsky on

    Consider the following possibilities to come to be
    explained and possibly be explored:

    Could the timeline and history distortions that are reoccurring and are resulting in the relocation and transplant of human settlements cultures and civilizations
    be originating from multiple earth clone sources or are they only coming from the Destroyermen’s world alone (Are the evolutionary-revolutionary changes/modifications derived from points of departure or from the point of arrival??)?
    The existence of another domination seeking human assimilating and expansionist predator intelligent species of superior dinosaur in direct competition against the Grik.
    The distinct possibility and likelihood that the League of Tripoli has already incorporated and absorbed disparate elements from a variety of Allied/Axis WW II military units.

    Reply
    1. By Clifton Sutherland on

      I think that there are a bunch of different worlds out there, each one a little (or a lot) different from our own, and they all seem to converge on this world. Even the destroyermen evidently come from an alternate timeline from our own, as evidenced by the different fate of warships involved, like the Walker and Amagi. For all we know, Orrin Reddy and the men on the Maru came from a different timeline from the Walker. Crazy stuff!

      Reply
    2. By Charles Simpson on

      Generally we have seen human cultures transported. but such things as the Swamp Lizards of Chill-chaap or even the Grik birds may have come from other worlds. The Gentaa may be from a world where monkeys developed a sentient species. Thus there could be reptilian cultures based on herbivores, there even could be cold adapted Neanderthals or other early species of man. There could be Lemurian groups in the jungles of south America. Pods of killer whales or dauphins that form a disciplined army and attack mountain fish and Gre-kaaka. The possibilities are infinite, and our poor author has to choose among them.

      Reply
      1. By Justin on

        Probably not herbivores. Omnivores maybe, but pure plant-eaters rarely evolve higher intelligence; you don’t have to hunt vegetation, after all.

        Reply
        1. By Clifton Sutherland on

          Or we could take this to the logical extreme and have sentient fruits come to take out the Grik. Fear the Melon. Fear it.

          Seriously though, you do notice that lots of films that have sentient animals will always have the herbivores be the protagonists, and they always end up outsmarting the predators. Somehow.

          Reply
          1. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

            I read that. Pretty good. And they wind up shooting at them in space with BB guns! (Sorry for the spoiler, and I won’t tell you how it worked out, but it was cool.)

          2. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

            Indeed. This time of year I fear many humble fruits–because they are fornicating in my nasal passages! The “Sneezin’ Season” has begun. My wife says “look at the pretty blue-bonnets!” and I mutter “damn things!”

            And the second part of your post reflects exactly why I had to evolve the Lemurians into omnivores that rely heavily on meat protein. Most Lemurs do not. But to thrive and then hold the Grik at bay long enough for their ancient exodus, I think they could only realistically have succeeded if they had evolved into cooperative hunters, that had achieved at least the agrarian settlement stage of development before the Grik came.

            How many of you think Lemurians were naturally “pacifistic,” or was this a societal construct to allow them to live together, packed in the great Homes? I think Courtney has addressed this point. Anyway, I can think of various great apes that are ostensibly . . . let’s say “vegan,” that engage in territorial combat with rival . . . let us say “tribes.” They sometimes use cooperative tactics–yet often engage in cannibalism upon their vanquished foes. So vegetarianism it is not wholly natural to them (IMO) and they still crave meat protein. Any number of herbivorous species can defensively cooperate in herds, against a few predators. Even then they tend to sacrifice the old, young and weak. They can’t WANT to lose them, particularly the young, but their simple, and entirely defensive tactics don’t allow for the flexibility necessary to confront the targeted attack upon a single of their number.
            In fact,I can’t think of ANY purely herbivorous species that could survive, let alone defeat, a concerted effort by a species of cooperative hunters to wipe them out. Hmm. I may have to save this and add it to Courtney’s treatise on “mercy.” How did you guys like that, by the way?

          3. By Alexey Shiro on

            //In fact,I can’t think of ANY purely herbivorous species that could survive, let alone defeat, a concerted effort by a species of cooperative hunters to wipe them out. Hmm. I may have to save this and add it to Courtney’s treatise on “mercy.” How did you guys like that, by the way?//

            Hm… Naked mole-rats? In fact, they are so unique and differet from all other mammals, that i wou;dn’t be surprised, if they, actually, came from parallel world) They live in hive-like colonies, they does not regulate their body temperature, they feel no pain at all, they could repair their own DNA to the tremendous extent, and they live awesome long for rodents (if the average rodent would have the human-long live, than the molerats would live about 1500 years!)

            Oh, and they are cute, also)

          4. By Generalstarwars333 on

            but but but but but zootopia…the sheep did it…*crawls away in a fume of awkwardness and misused words*

          5. By Generalstarwars333 on

            Also, that made my day. *is eradicated by the Melon*

        2. By donald johnson on

          well the elephant is a pure plant eater and there is no doubt that it is intelligent and capable of manipulating objects very delicately. in fact there is a SF using it as an intelligent alien in a book called footfall.

          Reply
      2. By Alexey Shiro on

        // The possibilities are infinite, and our poor author has to choose among them.//

        Well, i think we could rule out the extremes. The thinking plants, silicon-based lifeforms and giant insects are, undoubtedly, possible and fun, but I’m pretty sure that they wouldn’t be able to survive in generally Erarthlike Destroyermen’s world ecosystem. At least without really high technology.

        Reply
        1. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

          And giant insects, sadly. Much as I’d like to use them, there are physiological constraints dictated by the environment. There is probably enough oxygen for LARGER insects than they are accustomed to, but not 8 foot centipedes. The closest I’ve come are the spider-lobsters, but they are sea creatures that rarely venture ashore.

          Reply
          1. By Alexey Shiro on

            Unfortunately yes; and the fact that insects, being the largest class of animal live on Earth (and one of the oldest, too) were unable to solve this problems during all their evolution path – this fact clearly demonstrated that the possibility of large insects is evolutionary VERY remote.

            So… this leave us the mammals (check), reptiles(check), birds (hm… partially check), amphibians (probably check, but the swamp lizards currently are largely enigma). Hm, what about Synapsida’s?

  37. By Clifton Sutherland on

    So I tried to post this on the contact me page but it looks like there are still some issues with that.

    Going along with the Worlds I’ve Wondered Concept, is it alright if we post some writing or other fan fiction for the series? It would be nice to have a similar page for that, so we can get both peer review and Taylor approval.

    Reply
    1. By Charles Simpson on

      As would a place for Fan-art, model photos, convention photos. Taylor has mentioned seing people in Lemurian costume I would love to see a photo of such a costume, and perhaps even some Grik.

      How long is your fan-fic Clifton on the old site much over a page see my ethnographies at bottom, would be truncated for a post.

      Another possibility is to post on a Fan Fiction site and provide a link. How much trouble it would be to have another page or two added I have no idea. I do know Taylor is currently brushing up on a publisher’s deadline for book 12 and may not have time right now.

      You might just post it and see what comments it generates. The big problem is we don’t know what is hapening in book 11 & 12 and that means you have to write them in the past so to speak without wild speculation.

      Reply
      1. By Clifton Sutherland on

        Well my little work is more designed to be a background incident that won’t really have an impact on current named characters. It is about a skirmish between doms and allied cavalry during the retreat of the army of God from Fort defiance. The skirmish is small enough scale as to not really effect the outcome of campaign as we don’t know what chef Taylor is cooking. I spent a little bit detailing the conditions of the Dom army and especially it’s lower officers, and on showing what it’s like to witness an allied assault from the other side.

        It’s not quite finished but I can post a snippet of it here if that is alright.

        Reply
        1. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

          I don’t see why not. I’m still trying to get a definitive answer from my agent and editor concerning whether it’s a good idea for me to “host” fan-fic. if so, I’ll soon have a page dedicated specifically to it, beyond what we’ll do here–which is similar, in a sense. Frankly, it seems to me that it would be better to host it–than just have it “happen” elsewhere. Here, if people are monkeying around with stuff they should avoid, I have some control. I can make suggestions, say “ah, lets hold off on this one until the next book comes out,” or if the material is inappropriate, I can always delete it. There are technical copyright issues with ANY fan fiction and I understand why some authors discourage it, but at the same time, I don’t want to squelch enthusiasm for the story. Make sense? I will try to get a definitive answer, and when I do, hopefully, we’ll have a dedicated page. Until then, sure, post it here. Maybe Courtney included the “account” in a “De laPena Diary” context?

          Reply
          1. By Clifton Sutherland on

            Well here is a little piece- I don’t know how much text the website can take so this is just a few paragraphs.

            —————————————————–

            …Castillo ducked his head as a burst of rounds flew up the hill. All around him men were forming up, sweating under the morning sun as they surged to the crest of the little hill. The earth was rocky, craggy and uneven with only sparse clumps of trees and bushes spread out over dry, thirsty grass. The regulars were formed up around three ranks deep along the height, and looking down he could see the gently sloping valley below, swarming with invaders. They were moving up the hill now, perhaps one hundred fifty yards away now, moving steadily through the brush, firing as they went. To his left a trio of men went down, streaks of blood gushing down their dirty uniforms. “Get down, boys! Down!” he bellowed. Men were dropping down, either from enemy bullets or their own accord, hunkering down behind the hard crest. Little bursts of dust kicked up as the enemy continued to fire. Crawling forwards to the front rank, Castillo scanned for his sergeants. “Hernan!”
            “Yeah, boss?”
            “what can you see? How many they got down there?”
            The thin man scratched his stubble and took a spit. “at least a thousand, maybe more. Those cavalry, for the most part, but they have some of their damned dragons as well.” He made the sign of the Cross.
            Castillo nodded and signed as well. Grim news indeed. The enemy’s cavalry were not as skilled as their own, but carried fast firing carbines that outshot anything he had. Worse, they carried their terrible repeaters that made the sound of a thousand monsters crying out, dealing death like 20 good men, but in the hands of a single ape. He shuddered. For the past month he had been facing these creatures, and he was not privy to the assumption that they were not intelligent. They could fight just as well as any man. Better, in some cases. But they could be killed. It took a tremendous amount of righteous blood to do so, but they were of flesh and blood. And, Castillo thought, they were tremendously arrogant. Only a few thousand of them, attempting to attack the entire host of God? Surely their past victories had emboldened them. Now, they were alone, without their flying machines or their artillery. Their arrogance would be their downfall. He would make sure of that.

            “Move to the crest, men, and kneel! Kneel, because your lives depend on it!” he roared, and his men crept forwards, their heads just underneath the rocky crest that was alive with lead. “On my command, the first rank will move to the crest, just enough to see the enemy! You will fire and move back, and allow the next rank to come up. We will do this fast gentlemen, and we will do this well. No matter what comes up that slope, you will stand your ground!” his orders sounded nice and angry; he liked that, it scared the men into doing what needed to be done. The first rank obliged, moving up to the slope. Another volley from below struck a few, tumbling them backwards down the reverse slope. “Fuego!” he gave the command, swinging his arm down. The entire line, nearly five hundred strong, let loose a thunderous volley, their acrid smoke searing his eyes. The next rank was already moving up, struggling past their comrades streaming back to the safety of the hill’s shadow, reloading as they went. Beyond the hill Castillo could here another volley come up, striking more of his men down. And now we wait. We wait and we pray Lorenzo’s plan doesn’t fall apart.
            For five minutes the exchange lasted. By now Castillo had worked his way to a shallow depression along the crest of the hill. A sandy rock gave him some protection from the fire coming from below, as did the bodies of a few men who were unlucky enough to intercept a projectile with their flesh. Below the enemy was obscured by thick smoke, their shapes barely visible. His volleys were growing more and more ragged now, and the dead were mounting. But below the Apes were taking some heat as well. Most had dismounted already, and were formed up in a thin skirmish line, using the thick brush and the armored hides of their mounts as a barrier. Still, the sheer volume of his men’s fire had taken a toll. Dozens lay at the foot of the hill, unmoving. It was going well, so far he thought to himself. His face was pouring sweat under the sun and his ears barely worked. It was, frankly, terrifying, and Castillo ducked as each volley came towards him. Hernan, at least seemed to be enjoying himself. The crusty old veteran was moving through the lines, barking at the men when it seemed necessary to get them back in the fight, hitting a few for the hell of it. He had a grin on his weathered face, singing some battle hymn rather off key, but it was working. The men had held, and if they were privately terrified they did not show it…

          2. By Charles Simpson on

            Excellent Clifton I’d like to read more.

          3. By Alexey Shiro on

            Awesome, Clifton! I’d like to see more.

          4. By Alexey Shiro on

            Oh. Just read the Charles answer and suddenly notice that my is almost exactly similar) Seems like similar though patterns)

    2. Taylor AndersonsBy Taylor Andersons on

      Hey Clifton. What did you try to send? I’m getting stuff now. It is going to a different e-mail address for a while, but when I change servers, that will change. Maybe that;s why you couldn’t post stuff to me. If you ever have Pics or long text, anything of that sort, feel free to send it to my regular e-mail: [email protected] I will post “approved” fan art in the “Destroyermen Art” section. And there IS a place for model pics. They just have to come to me first. I’m sure you can understand that I have to be very careful about posting images. That said, I’m hoping to square it in such a way that moderated posters can put up pics in the discussion forums, as well as change their avatars.

      Reply
  38. By Charles Simpson on

    //Answers to questions by Courtney Bradford// to Questions from Sir Charles Simpson:

    How many eggs in a Grik clutch?

    //There are eight to fifteen on average, up to twenty–depending on diet. It’s a common natural mechanism for population control in the wild, but Grik aren’t in the wild anymore are they?//

    What is the percentage of hatchlings male, and percentage of hatchlings
    female?

    //that ratio is physiologically determined by environment or diet as well. Note the CM is bloated, and has lots of daughters. The few “brood mares” described have been kind of skinny, relatively speaking. That would make then crank out fewer eggs, mostly male.

    What’s the usual percentage of males aggressive and percentage of hatchlings defensive? I’d guess 10-20 eggs in a clutch, 75% male 25% female, and something like 60% aggressive, 30% defensive, and 10% passive.

    //That is a pretty good guess. A lot of this is subjective, though, and before Kurokawa’s experiments, Choosers usually made their choice based more on what was expected of them than any real objective criteria. You must wait on my definitive article on the subject.//

    Reply
    1. By Alexey Shiro on

      //that ratio is physiologically determined by environment or diet as well. Note the CM is bloated, and has lots of daughters. The few “brood mares” described have been kind of skinny, relatively speaking. That would make then crank out fewer eggs, mostly male.//

      I’m not sure about that. Yes, there is species where the gender determined non-genetically – crocodiles, for example – but I really doubt that Griks have anything in common with them.

      Reply
    2. By donald johnson on

      Not sure but my feeling is that the sex ratio would be heaver on the female side until the population became high enough to cause in-fighting. After all a high ratio of males is not a survival characteristic whereas the higher the female the greater the number of eggs in the next generation. The females will be the more aggressive of the two since they have to protect the eggs. The male will have several mates to watch over. The females will also tend to watch over their neighbors nests as whatever predator goes after the others nests will also be a danger to their own nest.

      Reply
      1. By Charles Simpson on

        Feel free to write your own letter to Courtney or a complete ethnography. As in the Order of Darwinian Delights you get recognition for your suggestions You got the mare Lizards, the Grik, Lemurians, Gentaa, possibly Grik Birds for intelligent species, and you can write monographs on animals in Destroyermen If it impresses Taylor you get to be a character in the series and chose your own name.

        Reply
  39. By Generalstarwars333 on

    I guess this is taking the place of the order of darwinian delight?

    Reply
    1. By Taylor Anderson on

      Yes. It will be that, but a whole lot more, eventually.

      Reply
    1. By Taylor Anderson on

      Thanks Stephen! Good to hear from you. The discussions got pretty lively on the old site and I hope this new forum–particularly once it’s finished–will generate even more.

      Reply
  40. By Chris on

    Whenever the series ends it would be cool to see this book written in turn.

    Reply
    1. By Taylor Anderson on

      Hi Chris. That’s the idea, on this forum if nowhere else. I will begin posting “excerpts” here, and folks are welcome to contribute. If their stuff is included in the overall “post,” (possibly slightly edited), it will become part of the canon, and the contributor will be “footnoted.” How does that sound?

      Reply
  41. By Charles Simpson on

    Two suggested Ethnologies from Courtney:

    Ethnographies:

    Lemurians:

    Physically Lemurians are stronger than humans there is less Sexual dimorphism in hight and strength than is seen in Humans. Gestation is six months single births are most common although twins and triplets are not unknown. Infants start crawling much earlier than humans at a week of age they are born with neck mussels able to support their heads. They begin walking upright at about three years of age and generally begin talking by sixteen months. As kilts can easily trip beginning walkers and interfere with crawling most younglings do not start wearing them until five years of age, and as they run faster on all fours youngling are often seen naked in public, and sometimes panicked adults remove their kilts to run on all fours. Females are sexually mature at age eleven and males at age twelve, until recently they were considered adults at age twelve, but the schooling required of members of modern society has changed this.

    Society:

    There are five main types of aboriginal societies among Lemurians; Madagascar, Laa-laanti, Continental, Of the Sea, and City State. I speculate the Laa-laanti are the closest to the original pre-Grik contact society.

    The Gentaa:

    It is a common fallacy in the Republic of Real People that they resulted from mating between humans and Lemurians, however recent archaeological evidence suggests they predate the Lemurian exodus (1), and are probably a species from another world. They are weaker than Lemurians but stronger than Humans and are between Humans and Lemurians in height. Their tails are more prehensile than Lemurians I’ve seen Gentaa boat builders hold tools not in use with their tail.

    Gestation is seven months, and single births are most common although twins and triplets are not unknown. Infants can hold their heads up within two weeks and begin crawling within a month. Gentaa begin walking at age two years, and begin talking at seventeen months. The Gentaa have a greater nudity taboo than Lemurians so you rarely see them running about nude as younglings. Males reach sexual maturity at age eleven years, and females at age twelve. Females are taller and slightly stronger than males the reverse of Human and Lemurian norms, it is speculated the onset of puberty greatly effects sexual dimorphism.

    The harsh conditions of south western Africa, a primitive material culture (fire hardened spears were their only weapon according to archeological evidence with few stone flake knives and scrapers found in their caves,) and large predators may account for their small population. Recently discovered early records indicate they were captured for slaves by early Chinese inhabitants. Their fate similar to any native culture meeting a more advanced colonizing culture, their original range was southwest Africa no caves were discovered east of Alexandraa.

    (1)The first cave was excavated by Sir Charles Simpson while serving as ambassador from the New Britain Isles. Imperial Society of Archaeologists Proceedings 1947, page 134.

    Reply
    1. By Taylor Anderson on

      Oh, I love this, Charles, though you assume a great deal:) Like I said, I may “tweak” it a bit, to fit the narrative, and things you don’t know yet, but this is exactly the sort of thing to go into the “book.” Compilation will be made AFTER suppositions have been confirmed or denied. How’s that? Or even if wrong, Courtney abounds with “theories,” as everyone know.

      And the way you footnoted yourself should become the standard. Hark ye, contributors! Come up with somebody “in world” to be referenced!

      Reply
      1. By Charles Simpson on

        I rewrote my first try to show an example, similar articles on other species of animals could be done by those wishing to suggest a critter a’la Darwinian Delights.. You will note not much on culture and a stress on physical attributes, even if numbers change it will give a list of questions courtne would wish to answer. We know a little bit more about the Lemurians than the Gentaa, and as you have noted before we don’t know what you have already written in Books 11 and 12. While I could write on the culture of the of the sea Lemurians and the City State Lemurians of Java, even the difference in Religion you so well explained in Crusade we don’t know the Continental Lemurians divided between the Czech Cats and the Republic of real people cats, both societies influenced by humans Longer termed in the Republic, perhaps as the Indus culture might have been in contact with the Indiaa Cats. based on the stone temples, might still be a small vestige of these people in the camps, but we as you note don’t know. Given no young humans noted I doubt it.

        Now to lighten the mood when are we going to see a pregnant female going home to be a mother? I can hear Safir saying “[email protected]#$ you Chack!” patting her growing belly. Or do the Lemurians have a birthcontrol plant? Stress of combat may explain fewer pregancies among them too, hmmm?

        Reply
          1. By Generalstarwars333 on

            I suppose that’s as good a reason as any.

        1. By Generalstarwars333 on

          You just had to put that image into our minds, didn’t you?

          Reply

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