4,772 COMMENTS :

  1. By Henry Breinig on

    Aside from all the Mauser 71s, the German members of the Republic was noted to have brought other equipment from SMS Amerika.

    Among these were Gewehr 98s and Lugers. While the G98s are in the typical 7.92 x 57mm, the Lugers are not 9 x 19mm. Instead, they are noted to be in the original 7.65 x 21mm Parabellum cartridge (otherwise referred to as “.30 Luger”).

    This would seem to indicate another possible point of divergence of the world the SMS Amerika came from when compared with the world the Destroyermen came from or our own. The Germans in our world primarily used Lugers chambered in 9x19mm though after the punishing Versailles Treaty in our history they did use some 7.65 Parabellum versions with short barrels through the 1920s.

    Regardless, I think it likely that along with newer rifle production that the Republic would look into more modern handgun cartridges and perhaps even into producing some semi-automatic pistols.

    Reply
    1. By Henry Breinig on

      A Pistol-Carbine in 7.63 Mauser could be interesting, especially if used in a similar fashion to the Artillery Luger (Lange Pistol).

      Reply
    2. By Paul Smith on

      how about the Republic redoing the 7.62 Mauser to the 7.62 X 25 Tokarev specs? If possible, that would be an effective submachine gun round ala the PPD or PPSh. Probably the PPD, since I don’t believe the Republic or Grand Alliance is up to stamping the parts yet.

      Reply
      1. By Henry Breinig on

        Actually, 7.63 Mauser is usable in guns originally chambered for 7.62 x 25. However, the other way around is rather dangerous.

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      2. By Justin on

        Maybe just have the burp gun shoot 7.62 Mauser?
        Still sounds better than the carbine. IIRC, there was Broomhandle with a stock and longer barrel that didn’t really catch on; pistol cartridges in themselves are generally too weak for intermediate range.

        Reply
        1. By Henry Breinig on

          There was a machine pistol conversion of the “C96” in 9×19 parabellum. That was the M712, and I reckon a version with a longer barrel and a stock would make for a fine submachine gun/ PDW.

          Reply
    3. By Matt White on

      While the P08 in our timeline was in 9mm parabellum, most commercial Lugers pre-war were in 7.65 Luger aka .30 Luger. The SMS Amerika being an odd duck converted commerce raider very well may have been issued commercial model Lugers to save P08s for the regular military.

      A fun bit of information, 9mm is based on 7.65. They use the same case, just in 9mm they didn’t bottleneck it. 7.65 Lugers can be converted to 9mm with just a barrel change. If the world that Amerika came from did adopt a 9mm P08 then the men on board would likely be familiar with it. 9mm is a superior round to 7.65 so it would be a good idea to switch over to it and existing tooling can be used. You only have to change the barrel and remove one step from the ammunition production process.

      Reply
  2. By Doug White on

    I know I haven’t reared my head and commented since the days of trying to figure out which battleship type Savoie was, but hot diggity ROB was really good. Was somewhat saddened by one of the deaths but heck the red shirts can’t always be the ones to die.

    Now I gotta start reading other stuff or else go and read all the back catalog. Oh woe is me (heh heh)

    Reply
  3. By Alexey Shiro on

    Considering anti-tank weaponry… during the war, Japanese sucsessfully tested & implemented what they called “rubber bomb” – basically, a first approach to High Explosive Squash Head (HESH) munition. It was very lightweight and compact anti-bunker bomb, which nose part was made of rubber, so when the bomb hit, the explosive filler (TNT and ultropine) sort-of spread out on the surface of the target & make explosion area greater.

    It was called “Ko-Dan”, and this small 50-kg bomb was capable of crushing a meter-thick reinforced concrete.

    I suspect, that this method COULD be used for Alliance to create portable anti-tank weaponry. Either rocket-propelled, or some sort of spigot grenade launchers (Japanese actually loved grenade launchers…)

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    1. By donald j johnson on

      If you can call 50 kg (120) lbs lightweight. That would require 2 men or 2 grik to carry and i sure would not want to be near it when it exploded.

      Reply
      1. By Alexey Shiro on

        …I was talking about general principle. There is no reason why it couldnt be downscaled

        Reply
    2. By Paul Smith on

      Do the Alliance or Republic have the capacity for high explosives? Courtney might know how to make nitroglycerine, but would he know TNT? I know dynamite is nitro in an inert stabilizer, would something like that be a first step in higher explosives? what could they develop with enough brisance to give an effective HE round for AT purposes?

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      1. By Lou Schirmer on

        The Union should. They’re probably using it already in their torpedo warheads, bombs & 4″ HE rounds.

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        1. By Paul Smith on

          I thought they used BP bursting charges, if I remember correctly.

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          1. By Lou Schirmer on

            Maybe initially, but if they’re making smokeless powder for small arms & some sort of nitrocellulose or cordite propellant for the modern naval guns, they have the means to make HE. Black powder would be an iffy proposition in a torpedo anyway, due to possible water damage to the warhead.

          2. By Taylor Anderson on

            If you’ll recall, they began using various smokeless powders for appropriate applications and HE bursting charges as far back as Iron Gray Sea. Lawrence’s surviving kin on Samar are almost wholly engaged in making nitrocellulose–and likely many other things by now–there. And though the raw material is still most abundant on Samar, other manufactories now exist elsewhere.

          3. By Matt White on

            They figured out gun cotton a while ago.

  4. By Justin on

    Just to recap, the Allies are now shooting:

    .30 Springfield
    11mm Mauser
    11mm Reichsrevolver
    .45 ACP
    .50 BMG
    .50-80 Allin-Silva

    25mm Type 96
    3″ DP
    75mm Derby
    4″ DP
    4.7″ DP
    ? (spoiler calibre)
    140mm

    10″/45
    340mm

    Not counting small arms from Savoie, Hidoiame or the Beaufort. Once Sofesshk falls, somebody needs to go over this sh*t and standardize it. Pronto.

    Reply
      1. By Henry Breinig on

        I also wouldn’t be surprised if there were some 6.5 x 50mmSR Arisaka rifles or a few Type 96s floating around- if not from Amagi or Hidoiaime, they could be from any of the other known (or future unknown) crossovers.

        Come to think of it, 6.5×50 wouldn’t be a terrible round to standardize on actually as the recoil impulse is low and the muzzle flash is small to almost non-existent. If nothing else, it would be a suitable upgrade to some of the rifles that are still firing .30-40. Conversion to 6.5x50mm would be easier than to a higher powered cartridge like .30-06

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        1. By Henry Breinig on

          6.5×50 if I recall correctly, is slightly heavier and slower than the original .30-40 loading. It also is likely more suitable for automatic firearms than the Krag cartridge.

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          1. By William Curry on

            The 6.5×50 had a lighter bullet than the 30-40 and a higher muzzle velocity. 139 grain bullet versus 220 grain bullet. 2475 fps versus 2000-2200 fps. The 6.5×50 was a semi-rimmed case which most people think would make it’s use in automatic firearms easier than the rimmed case of the .30-40; Especially in box magazines.

          2. By Henry Breinig on

            I guess the round I saw for .30-40 was a hotter, new loading. Your info makes more sense, and is more in line with my original line of thinking.

        2. By Justin on

          Not disagreeing, but wouldn’t going from 7.62 to 6.5 reduce effectiveness against Grik and large wildlife? And can they modify the Tommy and Blitzer designs to accept 6.5?

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          1. By William Curry on

            Not necessarily, penetration is related to striking energy, resistance to bullet deformation and sectional density of the bullet, as well as resistance to yaw upon penetration. Most military 6.5 have a good sectional density and do a good job of penetration. 6.5 M-S was preferred by some elephant hunters for brain shots because of its good penetration on bone.The 6.5×50 can not be used in the blitzer and the thompson as they are blow back operation. The 6.5×50 requires a locked breach. It’s also too long for both these actions which are built around the 45 auto cartridge.

          2. By Justin on

            I’ll defer to the experts. Just observing that the IJA themselves said that their 6.5 was underpowered, opting for 7.7 instead… nepotism, maybe?

            Sure but that means the Allies’ll have to replace their SMGs with a brand new one. Otherwise, they’re still shooting .45 (defeating the purpose of a standardized 6.5×50 round).

          3. By William Curry on

            It wasn’t that the 6.5 was underpowered, it was that the .264 diameter bullet makes it difficult to develop a good tracer and AP rounds. The 7.7mm had a bigger diameter bullet which made making these specialized rounds easier. The US in the 20’s actually felt that the 6.5 mm had better wounding effects than larger caliber, but that the small diameter made it too difficult to develop quality tracer and AP rounds, so they developed the .276 Pederson with it’s larger diameter bullet for this reason.

          4. By Matt White on

            The Thompson isn’t pure blowback, its better described as delayed blowback. In principle delayed blowback can be made to work with powerful cartridges. See the various roller delayed guns HK has made. However I’m not sure how well the Blish system would scale. Its a very different beast compared to the roller delayed system.

            As for the blizter, yeah its a tube gun like the sten or M3. Straight blowback and stupid simple. .45 is pretty much the most powerful thing you would want to use with that system. Any more and it would either become too heavy to be practical or would be very dangerous.

          5. By William Curry on

            The M1928 Thompson and earlier versions had the Blish Hesitation lock. The later M1 and M1A1 dispensed with the Blish device as it was needed, added to the cost and complication of manufacture.

    1. By Taylor Anderson on

      Standardization is always to be strived for, my buddies and I endeavor to ensure that all our same caliber weapons will shoot the same ammo, for example. But the Allies aren’t really using that many different things, and there has been a significant effort to standardize. Gray’s main armament is 5.5 primarily because they were already making liners for Amagi’s salvaged secondaries. Otherwise, 4″-50 has become the norm and the 3.7″s, etc., are in the process of being replaced. As for “small” arms, the Grand Alliance–not including the Republic–have standardized as quickly as they could upon .45ACP, .50-80, .30-06, and .50 BMG. Small lots of .30-40 are still made, as are other even smaller lots of (I bet) “spoiler caliber.” The stuff to make these was prepared during evaluation and still exists. They may well be adopted at some point and it makes sense to maintain the capacity, and making small lots is not that difficult. In any event, until they can mass produce an entirely new battle rifle the various “main” calibers still make sense and all have specific strengths and uses. The 6.5s are probably being fed by relatively small lots as well since they never recovered enough to supply a significant force, and other stuff was already being made.
      As for the Republic, they have standardized pretty well themselves, for them. Their rifles and pistols do not shoot the same cartridge but the bullet is the same diameter and the barrels can be bored on the same machine. Obviously, they’d require different rifling twists, but a .43 cal made sense for them. An Alliance-wide standardization would be ideal–eventually–but think about it: The US and Brits fought two world wars together and never standardized.

      Reply
      1. By Henry Breinig on

        On the note of the Republic, I wonder if we’ll see more modernized versions of the guns used by their Princeps monitors. German made 203mm or 210mm guns would bring some rather sharp teeth to the Alliance. Of course, the key issue would be the shell and charge hoists, as these limit rate of fire the most out of any single component of the turrets.

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      2. By Steve Moore on

        Taylor: does RRP have capability to build a bolt action .50 cal? Sort of a scaled dowm version of the Doom Whomper that mere mortals could shoot/snipe with.

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        1. By Justin on

          Great War-level tech means they’d probably be able to do a Tankgewehr, maybe a large-calibre Panzerbuchse or Wz.35. It’d be a nasty anti-material/anti-dinosaur/sniper rifle, but medium or heavy tanks’ll probably need a battery of Derbys.

          Say, I wonder if the Grik rockets have enough energy to launch a shaped charge? Something like a (very) primitive RPG would be handy too.

          Reply
          1. By donald j johnson on

            Is it potentially practical to even attempt shaped charges with black powder

          2. By Alexey Shiro on

            //Is it potentially practical to even attempt shaped charges with black powder//

            It is impossible. Black powder could not create supersonic detonation wave to compress the cavity.

          3. By donald j johnson on

            Well then i guess justin has his answer also.

          4. By William Curry on

            Black Powder deflagrates at a sub-sonic velocity. As the pressure goes up, the rate of deflagration goes down, which is the opposite of smokeless powder. Black powder and smokeless power are almost impossible to get to detonate. Urbanski, in his 1962 4 volume work on explosives, described experimentally trying to get smokeless to detonate. He finally succeeded, but had to use very large grain artillery propellant and initiate it with picric acid. Smokeless propellants usually have a negative oxygen balance so they produce a lot of carbon monoxide, a light voluminous gas good for pushing. High explosives (those that detonate) have a positive oxygen balance so they produce a lot of carbon dioxide, a dense gas suitable to transmit shock. To get a detonation, the rate of chemical change in the explosive has to exceed the speed of sound in that substance. The denser the substance the higher the speed of sound in that substance.

          5. By Steve Moore on

            Well, the rockets can push a payload of copper balls (figure half-inch?) plus a bursting charge a mile or so up, I would thing they could make an RPG motor, but it’d be worthless without the warhead. Better off as a bombardment rocket. But hate to think of what Grik rockets could do to Republic cavalry.

            Looking at the ceiling last night after putting down DD, and thought, Republic landing barges with eggbeater motors… Screw that, put a single bank radial on them and come up with a 40 knot airboat…

          6. By Matt White on

            It’s important to keep in mind that given the way the Grik rockets are described, they are nowhere near an RPG or any kind of shoulder fired weapon. They sound a lot more like a Congreve rocket. Simple, black powder things that detonate on impact. Essentially giant bottle rockets. Of course the Grik have improved them with time fuses but they are still pretty limited in their use. They are also wildly inaccurate and unreliable. About the only good thing about them is how cheap and easy they can be made. They have to be employed in huge mass volleys to be effective.

            More practical rockets, specifically effective HVARs, and shoulder fired rockets are going to require developments in solid rocket fuels beyond black powder.

            Apparently you can dissolve nitroglycerin in nitrocellulose and then add some solidifying materials (I assume stuff like saw dust) and can get a pretty decent solid rocket fuel. I know nitrocellulose is being produced by the Union and I’m pretty sure nitroglycerine is as well. If anyone knew enough about rockets to know that could be done then they could probably start making them sooner than you’d think.

      3. By Henry Breinig on

        About the .43 cal- I wonder if the Republic might create a version of that rifle with a magazine- something like a Vetterli Rifle or Mauser 71-84

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        1. By Taylor Anderson on

          Certainly. They clearly used a ’71 as their original pattern. Might’ve even had some ’98s to look at. Obviously had Maxims. So yeah, they can make ’71s with magazines. Lots of reasons they wouldn’t have to start with, but no real reason they can’t now. Might even convert existing rifles.

          Reply
          1. By Henry Breinig on

            I would think the conversions would be how’d they would start out, and then once the concept was proven and they had the basic tooling together the Republic would change the main production lines to the magazine conversions.

            As with the Allin-Silva rifles, I reckon the next step would be to rotate the originals out of the front as they are replaced with the new production magazine rifles. Then, the old rifles can be converted and sent back out, or issued to reserve units.

          2. By Matt White on

            The ’71-84 is exactly such a real world conversion. They added a tube magazine to the ’71. The vast majority were I think conversions. Would be a cheap and quick way to increase firepower.

    2. By Taylor Anderson on

      Actually, there aren’t really that many different small arms cartridges in production. .30-06, .45ACP (which can use the same basic case)and .50-80 and .50BMG (the barrels of which can both be bored on the same machines). There are a few “short run” calibers running around, like .30-40 and probably the “spoiler” caliber (I think) but that’s about it, and won’t require much diversion of production. As for Allied standardization, the Impies are going to Union designs but the Republic already has their own stuff that works and they’re geared up to make it. Getting one group or another to change over entirely at this point would not be feasible. Maybe in peacetime–like NATO did. Otherwise, I’ll point out that the US and UK fought two World Wars together and never even came close to standardizing. Even if they thought it was a good idea, in theory, it was not practical in time of war.

      Reply
      1. By Charles Simpson on

        If captured the Japanese Arisaka rifle cartridge factory would add a cartridge to feed captured Japanese arms. I’m sure the Konashi would want the cartridges made. Also we have the 25mm cartridge and other larger caliber rounds. During the American Civil War Confederate units became combat ineffective due to receiving the wrong cartridge for the multiple firearms used by the south.

        Reply
  5. By Joe Thorsky on

    Jacquerie ” continued

    “Economic control works differently.
    And to paraphrase that famous Salvor Hardin quotation of yours;
    “It’s a poor man’s atom-blaster that doesn’t work both ways.”
    pp 226 Foundation & Empire

    “To seize control of a world, they bribe with immense ships that can make war, but lack all economic significance. We, on the other hand, bribe with little things useless in war,but vital to prosperity and profits.
    pp 224-5 Foundation and Empire

    “The machines in the factories will, one by one, begin to fail. Those industries which we have changed from first to last with our new atomic gadgets will find themselves very suddenly ruined. The heavy industries will find themselves en masse and at a stroke, the owners of nothing but scrap machinery that won’t work”
    pp 223 Foundation & Empire

    Isaac Asimov- The Foundation Trilogy Equinox -Avon Books New York, 1974

    Casablanca revisited:
    Or “Capitalism.”
    “What Capitalism?!”
    ” There’s no Capitalism being practiced or operating here!”

    *As the battlewagons closed in for the kill, and huge geysers of water, caused by shells from their Main batteries were sprouting up all around the GAMBIER BAY, the gun Captain of her lone five-inch gun is reliably reported to have said, “Don’t worry, fellows, we’re sucking them in to 40mm. Range!”.….pp 149

    *”Breathed prayers of thanks for their miraculous deliverance, some young joker on the flight deck of the FANSHAW BAY yelled up to the bridge, “Better watch ’em, Cap’n—or they’llget away!”……pp 149

    *”The main battery of this great warship of ours consisted of one five-inch gun. This was mounted on the stern, and would not bear forward of the beam—a pretty clear indicator that if we met the TIRPITZ, we were expected to entice her into a running battle than slug it out with yardarm to yardarm.” …..pp 148

    **Jeeps had an antiaircraft battery of 40mm. pom-pom and 20mm guns. We released areological balloons from the flight deck, and the gun crews competed to see which could burst the balloons with the least number of shots.”….pp 148

    “Several of my officers pointed out a section in our current (Navy) regulations which could be interpreted as still authorizing payment of prize money. We estimated the U-505’s value as being several million dollars, and (we!?)visualized the possibility of getting fat checks from The US Treasury as we dragged our booty home. But that jackpot was never divided up. We found out when we got home that about thirty years previously some nosey and officious Congressman had repealed the law on which that section of the regulations depended”(The clearest case of Economic Piracy ever recorded {The US Government Giveth as the IRS Taxman taketh.}).” pp-215

    Clear The Decks by Daniel V. Gallery
    Warner Books, New York- 1949

    Yesterday, marked two somber unheralded historical seminal events and uncelebrated anniversaries, which mark an end and closure of an era violently and visibly scarred by turbulent and calcified social, cultural, technological economic upheavals and change.
    Gulf of Tonkin Incident 1964
    Welcome home! To all those unforgotten colleagues of Korea!

    Reply
    1. By Justin on

      Nobody’s contesting plywood – shit, even Goering was impressed by the Mozzie. It’s the glue we gotta worry about (especially in the jungles the Allies are currently fighting in).

      Reply
      1. By donald j johnson on

        And you are assuming that the glue being use for the last 200 years or so by the lemurian in a marine environment is inadiquate? My feelings are that it is fully capable of dooing the job at taylor has hinted several times.

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        1. By Justin on

          Ocean =/= air. All I know is that many adhesives weaken when in different climates or altitudes, or in intense air combat.

          For example, deHav’s Hornets were fine in Europe, but the heat and humidity of Southeast Asia caused them to have frequent unscheduled disassemblies.

          Reply
  6. By Joe Thorsky on

    “Jacquerie”

    “Our course of future history, did not count on brilliant heroics but on the broad sweeps of economics and sociology. So the solutions to the various crises must be achieved by the forces that become available to us at the time.”
    pp 222 Foundation & Empire

    Economic control works differently. And to paraphrase that famous Salvor Hardin quotation of yours; “It’s a poor man’s atom-blaster that doesn’t work both ways.”
    pp 226 Foundation & Empire

    “Why they don’t even understand their own colossi any longer. The machines work from generation to generation automatically, and the caretakers are a hereditary caste who would be helpless if a single D-tube in all that structure burnt out.”
    pp 224 Foundation & Empire

    Isaac Asimov- The Foundation Trilogy Equinox -Avon Books New York, 1974

    A short noteworthy Treatise on, and the best ever layman’s explanation and descriptionof the American Navy’s pre WW-II torpedo dilemma can be dissected, discussed, analyzed and found in Harry Homewood’s “Final Harbor” novel.
    McGraw Hill Book Company 1980 Chapter 16 – pp 152 to 157.

    Reply
        1. By Joe Thorsky on

          Charlie- You’ve got quite the Expletive Depleted sense of humor!!!
          Only suggest a little more of the WW- II Meuse River- Belgium be included.
          Also, your LSI need needs more of an Evinrude Wizard influence.
          Good Job You Dreamer You!

          Reply
        2. By Charles Simpson on

          WARNING SLIGHT RIVER OF BONES SPOILER.
          Nestor Menar was the artist of the first Bekiaa crossing the Ungee River rather than Washington crossing the Delaware River. The second drawing produced with the aid of Taylor Anderson having along Thai taxi tail with a low freeboard barge made quick by the engineers. OK can spoilers be posted today 1 August, or do we need to wait until 8,10,18?

          Reply
    1. By Henry Breinig on

      Are her twin DP mounts based or similar to the original Japanese design from the mid 20’s?

      Reply
  7. By Henry Breinig on

    Hmm, I’ve been thinking about U-112 quite a bit. While it’s not the greatest submarine, it does have a rather respectable armament, especially while surfaced. Now the real question is, now that it has defected to the Alliance, will it be refitted as a gunboat like S-19, or will it remain as is?

    Reply
      1. By Taylor Anderson on

        You’re right Don, but I think Henry’s new here and probably isn’t aware of the no spoilers for . . . how long? I forget . . . rule. Don’t think I want to delete somebody’s first post. Welcome aboard, Henry.

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        1. By Justin on

          Pretty sure it ends after three weeks (Tuesday). Anyone who hasn’t finished yet? Now’s the time.

          Reply
          1. By Lou Schirmer on

            I thought it was supposed to be a month after it was released, but I seem to recall Charles mentioning 1 Sept. on FB, so who knows. Maybe Taylor can call an audible & tell us when to let her rip.

          2. By Taylor Anderson on

            I think the old timeline was a month. It just seems longer this time since the book came out later. That said, it’s probably best to follow Charles’s lead on this since, though there aren’t that many frequent contributors here, a LOT of people check out what we write. Thoughts?

          3. By Justin on

            Not trying to pick a fight here, but September 1 is seven weeks after release, almost two months. I doubt we’ve ever agreed to wait that long.

          4. By Lou Schirmer on

            I think we somehow wound up with that date after a survey on FB. Don’t think Charles was happy with it, but went with the flow.
            Personally, I’m all for the one month after release date, which would be 13 Aug.

          5. By Justin on

            I can get behind that. Anybody else?

          6. By Charles Simpson on

            I suggested the first of the month after the book comes out for spoilers on the Assn. I am unaware of how the date was established here or where it is posted. Henry Breinig the Destroyermen Wiki has a page for the U-112 https://destroyermen.wikia.com/wiki/U-112
            Charlie

        2. By Henry Breinig on

          Actually, My bad. I actually was here about a year ago under another name. I’d forgotten about that rule.

          Reply
        3. By Henry Breinig on

          Also, feel free to remove that. I’ve got plenty of other thoughts anyhow 😛

          Reply
  8. By William Curry on

    Video on .30-06 Chauchat:
    https://www.full30.com/video/a07788998ae940b39a7b569e5921766f
    The Chaychat and the BAR were intended in the Great War to be run by a three man team; gunner, loader and scout who carried extra ammo and provided flank and rear security for the gun team. The automatic rifle(as opposed to the light machine gun) was intended to provide suppressive fire along with rifle grenades against entrenched machine guns to allow the riflemen and hand bombers to get close enough to finish the job. It is primarily an offensive weapon.

    Reply
    1. By Henry Breinig on

      It’s quite possible that we’ll see some of the 8mm Lebel version when the Alliance has more contact with the French parts of the League.

      Reply
  9. By William Curry on

    I’m wondering if the electrical plant on the Grey CL-1 has been upgraded fron 125v DC to 440v AC 3 phase? The electrical loads on the ships are only going to grow. Three phase lets them move more power around efficiently. 440 3 pz was the coming thing for ships in the late 30’s, the crew on the Walker would have know of it at least. Plus three phase would be very helpful for powering industry. The other option would be 2 phase 4 wire. But in the late 30’s it was on it’s way out. It was popular in the mines for reason.

    Reply
  10. By Justin on

    It’s come to my attention that the 10″/45s on Amagi would likely be outranged by WWII 8″ guns (27km against 30+). Any idea how the DD-verse IJN was planning to hunt cruisers with her, given that said cruisers would likely have a speed advantage as well?

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    1. By Dilandu on

      Er, they may increase her guns elevation to give more range. Japanese loved extreme elevations.

      And the role of Japanese battlecruisers was NOT to hunt enemy cruisers. Their main function was supposed to, in nighttime attack, break through cruiser screen around USN battleline, thus allowing the Japanese destroyers to make a torpedo tun against USN battlewagons.

      Reply
      1. By Justin on

        Fair enough. But then we run into the question of how the Allies will do the same; I don’t really see them producing turrets with 43 degrees of elevation by war’s end.

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    2. By Henry Breinig on

      Well, if we consider the possibility that the 10″/45 guns on Amagi were a newer model, or used shells with more modern propellants, the range might be greater than 27km.

      Reply

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