5,339 COMMENTS :

  1. AvatarBy Drew on

    One thing I’ve wondered about small arms in universe. I’m guessing the UH is going to copy the Springfield as its next generation rifle to replace the Allin-Silvas, but will they still be chambered in 30 caliber? Though maybe with a heavyweight 200-220 grain bullet to help with dealing with the wildlife rather than the service standard 150gr. Or would they keep the 50-80 cartridge of the AS since its already in production and proven?

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  2. AvatarBy Justin on

    Human/mi-anaaka ingenuity and Galla trees aside, how practical would a 800-foot ironclad actually be? Longest documented wooden ships in OTL were 400-500′ and even then many would flex in heavy weather.

    I’m guessing the Imperators are probably coppered like the Homes, and that would partially offset structural problems, but wouldn’t the Aratas have had some trouble? Or does the casemate absorb most of the wave action?

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    1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

      Well, they probably used a lot of metal to strengthen the structure.

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    2. AvatarBy Drew on

      I’d suspect the only thing that makes them or the Homes possible is the Galla trees being so strong. Diagonal bracing and 6 foot thick sides only go so far.

      It would be a neat engineering exercise to see what exactly you’d need to make one happen though.

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      1. Taylor AndersonBy Taylor Anderson (Post author) on

        Hi Drew! Actually, except for ships built for the initial “evacuation” of Madagascar, (probably actually considerably smaller), Galla trees weren’t available for their construction. On the other hand, without going back over some of the numerous examples, (sometimes in passing, I grant), of durable woods their descendants might use, design remained more critical to the structural integrity of Homes than the materials they were made of. They weren’t just diagonally braced, their timbers were diagonally cross-laminated in multiple layers.

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        1. AvatarBy Drew on

          Ok, I’m with you now.

          The image I had in my head was they were built like the Constitution, with diagonal bracing and extra thick bulwarks. What they actually sound like is the polar explorer ships on a massive scale, with multiple layers of diagonal and normal planking and bracing.

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  3. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

    Another couple of nit picky questions:

    1. On the Clemson & Wickes DDs decks, between the #4 stack & the aft deck house, there are two groupings of what could be hatches, skylights, ICBM launch tubes for all I know. Does anyone with access to better/more detailed blueprints know what these are? I’m doing a deck plan for the Gray & since she’s based off the Walker, she might have something similar. Does she Taylor?

    2. Walker has one blower to pressurize two boiler rooms. Grey has eight boilers. Does she have one, two or more blowers? I’d assume at least two, possibly as many as four. This is also for the deck plan I’m doing.

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    1. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

      Also, does she have directors for the 4″/50s, or are they in local control? I put the 5.5″ director where the old 4″ one was on the bridge. If you’re agreeable, I’ll put one on each side of the midships deck house.

      I noticed some mistakes on my original drawing & will be correcting them in this version. The most egregious was my 4″ guns bearing little resemblance to the actual guns on the Walker.

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    2. AvatarBy Taylor Anderson on

      You may be referring to the deck access hatches to the engine rooms. They’re there for the firerooms, too. I think, during hard-earned lessons in redundancy, Spanky would’ve insisted on redundant blowers. The question remains, which I honestly haven’t even considered, is how many firerooms does Gray have? Two or four? I think, for similar reasons, she’d have four–but the fireroom/engineroom layout would remain the same, for her class. Later efforts would probably attempt to stagger them for further redundancy.

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      1. AvatarBy Taylor Anderson on

        And yes, Gray has directors for the 4″-50s. Those were copied as early as USS James Ellis. Each side of the amidships gun platform might work, or a single raised position between the stacks. Not the best for fore and aft work… I’ll consider that. There are not yet any anti-air directors and even the DP guns must go to local control for that. I think the question has been raised about rangefinders? The Impies have the optics to make them, but they’d probably be just as useless at speed on the new Wickes/Walker Class as they were on Walker and Mahan, unless they were buffered in some way. Vibration was always the issue that made them useless, so spotting ladders were employed from the start. Gray might actually be able to make use of an available rangefinder, but her crew would probably still use spotting ladders. The good thing, with their superior eyesight, a well-trained Lemurian fire control team might actually be better at range estimations than Greg Garrett was.

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        1. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

          If they went with simple copies, she probably has four boiler rooms. From your silhouette’s stack spacing, they appear to be eight in-line taking up a hull length of about 150′ (double Walker’s). This gives them more protection with compartments & fuel tanks outboard of the boiler rooms, but makes for very long steam lines from the forward boiler rooms. I’m going to give her four blowers (one for each boiler room) unless you say otherwise.

          There appears to be a range finder on the spotting top in the silhouette. That may be where the 4″ range finder was relocated to, to make room for the 5.5″ director? You’re right about the vibration though, especially up in a spotting top, waving around in the breeze, where every bit of a ship’s motion is amplified. If Amagi’s 4.7″ DP directors have been adapted to control the Gray’s 5.5″ DP’s, they could also be adapted to control the 4″/50 DPs using different ballistics tables. That’d be a quick way to get a DP secondary director & if it worked well enough, retrofit it to the DDs.

          Spotting Ladders? Is that similar to the Ladder Method of ranging salvos? Or is it an actual device?

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        2. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

          I’d go with two 4″ directors, one on each side of the mid-ships deck house. It gives them the ability to engage two targets at once with directed fire & the directors would have an increased action arc by being placed closer to the ship’s side.

          As far as fore & aft fire goes, only the stern 4″ has a direct line aft. The other mounts would be damaging the ship & concussing the crew if they fired directly forward or aft. They may have combined the Walker’s range finder & director in one unit to simplify things by the time Gray commissioned.

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      2. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

        ” I think, for similar reasons, she’d have four–”

        Well, considering that she is a product of more primitive tech than “Walker”, I would bet on four. Maybe even more, because her equipment would probably be bulky, underpowered and unreliable. IMHO, of course)

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        1. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

          Probably another reason he went with eight boilers for three turbines, instead of six. They weren’t sure of their boiler tech when designing & building Gray, so they gave her a little something extra to make up for any deficiencies.

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  4. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

    Just out of curiosity & for future nit picking purposes, are the twin .50 cal MGs on the Gray air or water cooled. I think they’ve got the air cooled in production, but don’t know about the water cooled variant.

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        1. AvatarBy donald j johnson on

          Lou, you are so vehement about no spoilers then you go and try and trick taylor into giving one

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          1. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

            The Gray was already out there from ROB, but I see your point.
            On the other claw, I could care less about spoilers. I just bow to the will of the swarm.

    1. AvatarBy Taylor Anderson on

      Water cooled. All land, ship, and tank-borne MGs are water cooled. Some air-cooled versions are being installed on SOME aircraft.

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  5. AvatarBy Paul Smith on

    Just some random thoughts. To get ANY high altitude aircraft, they’ll have to develop an oxygen system the Lemurians can use. Just compressing the air would be a wasted effort. They should have a few spares for the P-40’s left, hopefully the demand regulators & masks for the O2 system would be some of them. Could they use something like vaseline to help seal a mask to their faces? With rubber becoming available, reproducing at least a modified mask should be possible. Next gen hulls should also be in the design pipeline. The Walker/ Mahan hull design is pretty dated. Maybe Spanky could get some smart ‘cats at BuShip to look at the goldplater designs he drew from memory. Plus they have Hidoiame’s carcass to look at.
    The next ship I’d like to see come through would be something like the Medusa (AR-1). Imagine the possibilities, with the knowledge and information the crew would have at their fingers!

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    1. AvatarBy Justin on

      If you’re willing to wade through the previous pages, there’s talk of regulators or even full-body flight suits.

      Book 7 mentioned the Farraguts as an inspiration; IMO they’d be best served by merging the Walker-class and the Gray-class into one 2000t DD hull and going from there.

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    2. AvatarBy Steve Moore on

      Funny, was thinking about my college football mouthguard when you mentioned rubber masks. Why not a ‘mask’ that goes inside the mouth, with an oxygen tube running up into it. Sort of like a scuba regulator. Think sub escape lungs had rubber mouthpieces too, but will leave that to the research experts here.

      See, Taylor, I can think about other things besides rockets.

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      1. AvatarBy Paul Smith on

        Didn’t the escape lungs also have clips for the nose?

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        1. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

          Lemurian noses may be too sensitive for clips, like a dog’s or cat’s nose.

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  6. AvatarBy Charles Simpson on

    We are currently having a discussion on this on the Destroyermen Fan Association page on Facebook. Current American Navy Clan carrier aircraft are probably unarmored or lightly armored. The crew of the Hidoiame might know of the “Kido Buti” or “Attack Force” with two or more carriers task groups opposed to the American single carrier taskforce of the early war known to Walker and Mahan’s crews. This may have some unfamiliar buzz words for future carrier tactics of the union. Sorry the video is by a German so the accent is a might thick at times: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8U3rkTXAlM&t=536s&fbclid=IwAR2gv2LiDd7x9Xh-mH3v0Y0lZ35kfz22bJ5bQ89bBFZ0oe2PnKQrgmhnm6k

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  7. AvatarBy Joseph R Thorsky on

    For all of you suits and skirts wannabees:

    Just a friendly “Lemmy Caution” and reminder that just
    as the LOT’s insertion hasn’t strictly followed historical norms
    it can justifiably be rightly assumed with a high degree of confidence
    that GB and the Commonwealth has also undergone a similar type of Taylor-
    made transformation.
    For Example: Suppose the Easter Rebellion had
    succeeded with a United Ireland dominating over a diminished British Monarchy.
    It would put the military powers/forces facing each other in the Atlantic and the Med in very similar circumstances/positions.
    Uncertainty, caution and paralysis in decision-making would be the predominant order of the day!

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    1. AvatarBy Joseph R. Thorsky on

      As Corrected
      For you suits and skirts and all youse “PC Correct” don’t ever wannabees:

      Just a friendly “Lemmy Caution” and reminder that just
      as the LOT’s insertion hasn’t strictly followed historical norms
      it can justifiably be rightly assumed with a high degree of confidence
      that GB and the Commonwealth has also undergone a similar type of Taylor-
      made transformation.
      For Example: Suppose the Easter Rebellion had
      succeeded with a United Ireland dominating over a politically diminished
      British Monarchy.
      It would put the military powers/forces facing each other in the Atlantic and
      the Med in very similar untenable circumstances/positions.
      Uncertainty, of the unknown automatically dictates caution and paralysis in decision-making
      which would likely be the predominant order of the day!
      Atrophy and discretion would be the end result.

      Happy Birth Day NUS!1

      Reply
  8. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

    One thing I would like to get clarified is regarding Savoie’s main battery. Is it 13.5″ (343mm) or 13.4″ (340mm)? In our world the Bretagne class ships had the 13.4″ (the French never did make a 13.5″). The French used the metric system & went with an even metric number, while the British using Imperial measurements of inches wind up with odd numbers in metric. Are we going with the thought that they armed the Bretagne class with 13.5″ guns in the AU the LOT came from?

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    1. AvatarBy Justin on

      That’s true, the other Bretagnes had 340mms. So either Mr. Anderson missed a decimal point somewhere, or the PFF Navy came to terms with numbers that weren’t multiples of five or ten.

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      1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

        …Sometimes I wonder: how long it would take for Americans to finally get rid of those “imperial” system? Seriously, there isn’t even any British Empire anymore)

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        1. AvatarBy Justin on

          In fairness, there’s a lot of stuff that’d need changing, and it’s a big country. Imagine needing to swap out almost every road sign in Moscow… or Siberia.

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          1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            Well, we done exactly that in 1917 (Russia used more traditional system before). And also modernized our grammar quite a bit)

        2. AvatarBy Charles Simpson on

          My guess is that screws will be the first crack in the dam of our stubbornness. Authoritarian countries find it easier to make sweeping changes too, even against popular will 😉

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          1. AvatarBy Alexey Shiro on

            Well, one of the (frankly, very limited) advantages of authoritarian rule, is that it sometimes allow government to pursue right decisions, not the ones that public loved)

        3. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

          Automotive & machinery wise, as far as nuts & bolts go, we’re already metric. When you see speed limit signs in kilometers per hour is when we’ve come fully over to the dark side.

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          1. AvatarBy Justin on

            Yeah, but then you’ve got satellites crashing into Mars because NASA’s engineers use metric and Lockheed Martin’s don’t.

          2. AvatarBy Taylor Anderson on

            The irony is, we started out “metric” as far as machine screws were concerned, copying French muskets. And US military arms stayed metric until the ‘03–when we finally said the hell with it and went “standard” probably because we were making so many P-14s for the Brits. Then everybody went metric and left us by ourselves again!! I think Bekiaa is right. .50 caliber just sounds better than 12…whatever mm. Oh, look forward to more of her griping about stuff like that.

          3. AvatarBy Paul Smith on

            you haven’t driven by Tucson, AZ have you?

          4. AvatarBy donald j johnson on

            Were the French already into metric during the revolutionary war? I had thought that they didn’t go metric until after their own revolution.

    2. AvatarBy Taylor Anderson on

      It is 240 mm. The 13.5 came from characters rounding off to “13 and a half’s” in dialogue. Like usual, CEs are sometimes too literal.

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    1. AvatarBy Steve Moore on

      My guess is that as designs and manufacturing become more complex, the harder it is to scratch up the capital to invest in a plant. Just a thought.

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    2. AvatarBy Joseph R. Thorsky on

      Lou:
      With little more than 5 weeks until Pass of Fire is published.
      The Prewar WWI and WWII development of Aviation resulted not just from an unrestricted form of free-market capitalism as epitomized by The Calvin Coolidge Era. Development only resulted from some vitally important series of events which were remarkably adaptive, innovative and transformative. We’re even now still being effected and affected by, and are living in the shadow of the decisionmakers and leaders of that era.
      Suggest for further study review and reference the following British periodicals (FYI-no relation to
      pteradactal or the pteranodon is either implied or intended.)
      1 Modern Wonders-Modern World
      2 Fantasy Collector
      3 Pulpdom and Argosy
      No Trip for Biscuits Here!

      Reply
  9. AvatarBy Justin on

    Finally got around to scanning my motorjet Fleashooter. No idea how much of it’s aluminum or wood or steel – or if it can even fly – just wanted to see what it looked like.

    https://imgur.com/8S3Hh2O

    Reply
  10. AvatarBy Generalstarwars on

    So we’ve established that the single shot 37mm AA gun on the U-boat would probably make an excellent tank and anti-tank gun for the union. I guess this leaves the question of how that should be carried out. How quickly can they start producing copies of this weapon? Should they try mounting some in their current tank designs, or design a purpose based carrier for it? Heck, could they maybe mount one in the nose of a Nancy or whatever strike aircraft will be replacing it to use in tank busting? How practical would it be to try and make an automatic version of this weapon for possible AA use?

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    1. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

      I think their current tanks are a bit small to handle the 37mm gun. A slightly larger tank with either a casemate or turret would be the way to go.
      The single shot version of the 37mm (if that’s what the U-boat has) would be fairly easy to reverse engineer.
      They’ll need a bigger plane to put it in than a Nancy. The gun itself weighs over 500 lbs. & the recoil would rip it right out of the fuselage.
      They could make an auto version of it, but it would take a while (1-3 years) to get it engineered, tested & the bugs worked out, but would be a good long term investment.

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      1. AvatarBy Justin on

        Baalkpan’s already busy on the Type 96, though. Pretty sure that logistically speaking it’s either one AA gun or the other.

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      2. AvatarBy Matt White on

        Given that the 37mm we are talking about is a single shot gun I don’t think it would be modified to automatic so as much as you would develop an entirely new gun that uses the same cartridge.

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      3. AvatarBy Steve Moore on

        Too heavy to put on a PT? Although a twin M2 mount would probably be more effective and already developed. Something sticks in my mind about this being a common modification to South Pacific USN PT’s, adding 37mm AT guns to use on Japanese barges.

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        1. AvatarBy Matt White on

          IRL 37mms were put on PTs by their crews. I think they got them from P-39s and the like.

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          1. AvatarBy Lou Schirmer on

            They were put on the 80′ boats as well as the occasional 40mm Bofors. The 37mm would be about as large as you could go on one of the DDmen MTBs, but it would fit…somewhere.

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